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Amila Pilav-Velić, Hatidža Jahić, Jasmina Okičić and Meldina Kokorović-Jukan

Abstract

Education plays a central role in today’s understanding of growth and development dynamics. However, its relationship with other factors is complex. This paper aims to investigate the effect of different forms of education on youth employability in Bosnia and Herzegovina. This is done by using the USAID MEASURE – BiH National Youth Survey. Research has shown that formal education and non-formal education through internship programmes, volunteering, paid jobs other than internships are significant predictors of youth employment status. The study also has several implications for academics and practitioners since it provides new insights into both employment patterns and practices in one transition economy but also calls for further analysis of the link between education, formal and non-formal, and youth employment.

Open access

Savo Stupar, Amila Pilav-Velić and Elvir Šahić

Abstract

Background: In contrast to the rational (IQ) and emotional intelligence (EQ), spiritual intelligence (SQ) is often underestimated and insufficiently investigated. This type of intelligence refers to our approach to the issue of the meaning and value of life, in terms that our actions are placed in a wider context. Objectives: The aim of this paper is to investigate in which extent spiritual intelligence determines the decision making process. In this context, the success of business decision is assigned as its functionality as one of the most prominent feature of successful decision. Methods: The inductive method of building an expert system, i.e. a knowledge based system (Doctus Knowledge-Based Expert System Shell) and casebased concluding on the degree of informativeness (with a key impact on functionality of decision) of individual components (Case Based Reasoning) are used in testing this relationship. Results: The study demonstrates the fact that most of respondents (managers) have not been even familiar with attributes of SI as well as their relationship with decision making process. Conclusions: Identification of the most significant components of SI that affect effectiveness of decisions would allow managers to focus on those which mostly contribute to the functionality of their decisions.