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Mary C. Cowman and Alma M. McCarthy

Abstract

Training transfer is the extent to which human resource development (HRD) interventions result in a change in trainee workplace behaviour post-training. Training transfer is an important dimension of training effectiveness. However, studies on training transfer are not extensive and some of the findings are inconclusive. Drawing on a study of 124 trainees across 102 similar organisations within the Irish health care system, the current study investigates the effect of demographic variables (age, educational background, position), situational variables (time since training, tenure, recruitment to the training programme, preparation for training) and organisational size on training transfer. Regression analyses report that current position significantly impacts training transfer in terms of direction, while method of recruitment to the training programme, age and employment tenure were all significant predictors of training transfer complexity. The findings report that age is not a barrier to training transfer. These results have important implications for HRD practitioners with regard to the profile of the workforce in this setting, the training and development function and trainee recruitment.

Open access

Maureen Maloney and Alma McCarthy

Abstract

This paper applies a model of bounded rationality to study small employers’ decision-making on pension provision in Ireland. Personal Retirement Savings Account (PRSA) pension products were intended to provide inexpensive, flexible pension options, particularly targeted towards small enterprises. After 10 years of their introduction, evidence suggests that the PRSA pension product has little impact on pension coverage in Ireland and the employees of small organisations are least likely to be the members of pension schemes. Drawing on the theory of bounded rationality and a review of the legislative and institutional context within which small employers in Ireland make decisions on pension provision, this paper presents a pension decision-making model of small employers based on the work of Simon (1983). A range of propositions are set out for empirical research to examine pension provision practices of small employers relating to whether they have a tendency to organise rather than sponsor PRSAs for their employees. The implications for theory, research and policy are explained.