Search Results

1 - 3 of 3 items

  • Author: Alexandru Iacob x
Clear All Modify Search
First Outcomes of Grafting Wolfberry in Romania

Abstract

Grafting berries is a topic untouched by researchers or practitioners till now in Romania due to the convenient and widely spread way of classic propagation methods. Nevertheless, the positive effect of grafted plants in commercial orchards is well known at many other species. Traits like precocity, uniformity, fruit size and yield stability is desired to be achieved in this manner. By grafting berries, we look forward to eliminate the actual shortcomings of the traditional crop systems, mainly generated by bushy crown shape that requires large distance between the plants, difficulties in mowing or weeding process along the rows, pruning and harvest operation in a uncomfortable arch position, discontinuous application of pesticides inside the bush etc. In this regard, different methods and trials have been conducted in the last two years at the University of Agronomic Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Bucharest in order to eliminate these bottlenecks in the berry technology trough grafted plants.

Open access
The cultural heritage circulation in a globalized world: Should we build stronger borders or stronger bridges?

Abstract

The scope of this paper is to explore if the free market and its corollaries - private property and the freedom to trade both nationally and internationally - are compatible with the conservation, search and optimal use of heritage goods. Our argument starts from the fact that culture is not a free-floating wraith but a set of tangible and intangible elements that are attributed special spiritual signification by the present generation and that are dependent on scarce material means to be expressed and passed on to our heirs. By taking scarcity as our starting point, we will provide an economic analysis of the implications that follow from the alternative approaches that can be employed to manage heritage goods, namely, a private property order coordinated through prices or a public property form of organisation coordinated through orders and interdictions. After tracing the implications of these two general principles of allocating resources, we will briefly look at how heritage goods are regulated, both on a national and international level, to gain a better understanding of the spirit that permeates the "rules of the game." Finally, we are going to see how the two general principles (market vs command and control) apply to the debate raging between the cosmopolites and the nationalists regarding the international trade in heritage goods. After carefully scrutinising some of the arguments put forward in this dispute over the appropriate means to be used, we conclude that free markets and free trade are the only adequate ways for reaching the objective sought by those on both sides of the debate.

Open access
Cultural heritage markets: are traders traitors? Winners and losers from cross-border shifts of historical artefacts

Abstract

The concept of cultural heritage covers the tangible and intangible things bequeathed from the past generations along with a spiritual signification, beyond any other serviceableness. Anthropologists, sociologists, philosophers and aesthetes are the critical reviewers of the field, while legalists and economists contribute with their own concerns: regulation and evaluation. Be it of tangible nature – i.e., buildings, sites, paintings, sculptures or various other artefacts – or of an intangible one – i.e., traditions, practices, beliefs, literary or musical compositions –, the cultural heritage has challenged the economists urging them to offer sophisticated tools to assess its value, to make cost-benefit analyses with respect to its preservation, restoration or reuse. The supporters of regulation in the cultural goods market justify it through the fact that the market cannot provide in an efficient manner this type of goods, the solution being national government intervention – i.e., for the regulation and finance of cultural/heritage goods – or even international government regulation, in cases when national states’ failure is encountered. A widespread opinion is that heritage is communal, par excellence, this view implicitly adjusting the acceptation that private property has in the cultural realm. The present paper addresses the reality and the necessity of ownership and movement of heritage goods especially in the international markets, considered as a dangerous vacuum for national cultural treasuries.

Open access