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Alexandra Sima

Open access

Alexandra Sima

Open access

Diana Bănică, Ramona Frăţilă, Alexandra Sima, Adrian Vlad and Romulus Timar

Abstract

Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are characterized by the association of two or more autoimmune diseases. They are classified into two major subtypes, each having its own characteristics. The autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined by the presence of at least two of the following diseases: Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases belonging to the autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 are: primary hypogonadism, myasthenia gravis, celiac disease, pernicious anemia, alopecia, vitiligo. We are going to present the case of a patient, aged 40, with diabetes mellitus (probably latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult), chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac disease.

Open access

Corina Marcela Hogea, Alexandra Sima, Alin Albai, Mihaela Rosu and Viorel Serban

Abstract

Background. Diabetes mellitus is a serious pathological state, which shortens the lifespan, with severe complications and increased mortality. Objective. To study the main aspects regarding the survival for a period of 30 years, in patients newly diagnosed with T2DM in the Diabetes Center Timişoara. Material and methods The study enrolled 4,913 subjects, 2,742 women (55.81%) and 2,171 men (44.19%), mean age at diagnosis of 58.2± 11.5 years, diagnosed with T2DM between 1970 and 1999. Results We observed a decreasing trend of the all cause death between the analyzed groups as well as within the same group, during the study periods. Conclusion Our data support the results of numerous longitudinal descriptive studies indicating a decrease of the secular mortality trend, but especially of mortality in the last decades in diabetic patients.

Open access

Teodora Chiţă, Monica Licker, Alexandra Sima, Adrian Vlad, Bogdan Timar, Patricia Sabo and Romulus Timar

Abstract

Background and aims: There is evidence that patients with diabetes have an increased risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTI is the most common bacterial infection in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of UTIs among hospitalized diabetic patients and to identify the most frequent bacteria responsible for UTI. Material and methods: The study population included 1470 diabetic patients (847 women and 623 men), admitted to the Diabetes Clinic of the Emergency Clinical County Hospital Timişoara, between January and December 2012. We collected patients’ personal history data and performed urine cultures. For statistical analysis we used Graph Pad Prism 5; the significance of the difference between the percentage values was assessed using Fisher’s exact test. Results: From the total number of patients, 158 had positive urine cultures, meaning 10.7%. Out of the total number of 158 UTIs, 124 (78.4%) were asymptomatic bacteriuria. The most frequent bacteria involved in UTI was Escherichia coli (68.9%). Conclusion: UTIs are frequent in diabetic patients. Because of the great proportion of asymptomatic forms among diabetic patients, the urine culture should be performed in all hospitalized patients with diabetes.