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  • Author: Alexandra Maria Rașcu x
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Are there still other asbestos-related malignancies to be discovered?
Case-report of Mycosis fungoides in a patient with occupational asbestos exposure

Abstract

Mycosis fungoides is one of the most common forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Its diagnosis is sometimes challenging and quite difficult for the physician, because its onset clinical appearance is similar to other skin diseases. Although there are a few hypotheses about mycosis fungoides’ etiology, they aren’t fully understood and still need confirmation. We report the case of a 68 years old patient diagnosed with mycosis fungoides, who has been exposed to asbestos fibers. This case is one of the few reported cases of association between asbestos and mycosis fungoides. There is no data exploring the causal relation between asbestos exposure and mycosis fungoides but common biological mechanisms could represent an argument. If occupational exposure to asbestos will be confirmed in larger studies, a new research-field of asbestos-related diseases needs to be opened.

Open access
Acrylic sculpting nails, an occupational hazard for contact dermatitis. Case reports and review of the literature

Abstract

Acrylates are plastic materials formed by the polymerization of monomers, which are recognized as powerful sensitizers that may cause allergic contact dermatitis both in occupational and non-occupational environment. In the occupational setting, the most exposed workers are the dentists, dental technicians, prosthesis technicians, printers, painters, fiberglass workers and nail technicians. We describe four cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in nail technicians caused by acrylic compounds that illustrate numerous clinical manifestations. Clinical manifestations ranged from edema, erythema, scaling and fissuring fingertips to erythematous patches around the chin, mandible and abdomen. Patch testing results revealed positive reaction to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate in all patients. Of the four patients, two changed jobs, one stopped exposure because of pregnancy and one patient continued working, showing no improvement, despite undergoing treatment. These cases underline the importance of improvement of preventive measures in the workplace.

Open access
The need to improve screening and diagnostic methods in occupational irritant dermatitis

Abstract

Modern medicine has increasingly directed its interest towards discovering the etiology of occupational dermatitis, but unfortunately it is not completely elucidated. As with other occupational diseases, the presence of the exposure and the temporal relation between the exposure and the appearance of the characteristic signs is a defining element, but obtaining the information on the etiological factors is not always easy, therefore the attention must be directed to a systematic collection of these data. Clinical diagnosis is not sufficient, so additional paraclinical tests are needed for a complete diagnosis. Currently, more and more emphasis is being placed on experimental studies targeting the discovery of molecular or genetic markers that complement the idea of individual susceptibility in the appearance of contact dermatitis. As frequent as it is difficult to diagnose, occupational dermatitis is still a public health problem.

Open access
Working in Shifts and the Metabolic Syndrome: Epidemiological Evidence and Physiopathological Mechanisms

Abstract

The Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is considered as an association of the abdominal obesity, abnormal metabolism of the lipids and glucose (high level of triglycerides, low level of HDL-cholesterol and high level of glycemia) and high values of blood pressure, determined by an underlying mechanism of insulin resistance. As a result of environmental-gene interaction, MetS is associated with unhealthy nutrition, smoking, alcohol abuse, lack of physical activity, shorter sleep duration and desynchronization of the circadian rhytm caused by working in shifts. The aim of this article is to review the effects of working in shifts on the MetS through the epidemiological evidence and the perspective of the physiopathological mechanisms.

Open access