Search Results

1 - 3 of 3 items

  • Author: Aleksandra Gajda x
Clear All Modify Search
Between Individualism and Collectivism: Perception and Profiles of Creativity in Poland and Japan

Abstract

The aim of the study was to analyze creativity profiles and understanding of creativity in Poland and Japan. The study included 597 participants (233 Polish and 364 Japanese). Qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out (mixed method). We identified the existence of five different creativity profiles and ten categories for defining creativity, with significant differences in frequency between the two countries. The obtained results are discussed from the perspective of intercultural differences and the individualism / collectivism theory (Hofstede, 1983).

Open access
Erratum. Slumps and Jumps: Another Look at Developmental Changes in Creative Abilities
Open access
Slumps and Jumps: Another Look at Developmental Changes in Creative Abilities

Abstract

The aim of this study is the analysis of creativity changes across life, particularly the widely discussed crisis periods in the development of creative abilities. A large and diversified sample of Poles (N = 4898 aged from 4 to 21 years), at each educational stage of the Polish education system, from pre-schoolers, through primary school students, middle-school students, secondary-school students and finally university students completed the Test for Creative Thinking – Drawing Production. The observed changes showed a nonlinear pattern in the development of creativity with diverse declines and increases in creative abilities. These trends are different for each of the assessment criteria of the TCT-DP and at least three different trajectories were identified. The adolescent slump was confirmed for three of the 14 assessment criteria as well as the total TCT-DP score. What was not noted however was: a slump caused by entry into formal schooling, (age 6 vs 7), 4th grade slump, (age 9 vs 10) and 6th grade slump (age 11 vs 12). We discuss possible reasons for and consequences of the findings.

Open access