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  • Author: Aleksandar Uroševic x
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Aleksandar Urošević, Olga Dulović, Branko Milošević, Nebojša Maksić, Nataša Popović, Ivana Milošević, Dragan Delić, Djordje Jevtović, Jasmina Poluga, Jelena Jordović, Sanja Peruničić and Goran Stevanović

Summary

Background: West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease (WNND) occurs in less than 1% of infected people. Leukocytosis with lymphocytopenia, mild anaemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated liver and muscle enzymes and hyponatremia are occasionally present in patients with WNND. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings resemble other viral neuroinfections. The purpose of this study is to present some of the most important laboratory findings of our patients with WNND and to evaluate their correlation with fatal outcome.

Methods: The study included 161 patients with WNND. Their blood and CSF samples were cytobiochemically analysed and the obtained variables were then tested for predictive significance of the disease outcome, or used for differentiation between two clinical syndromes (encephalitis vs meningitis).

Results: West Nile encephalitis was present in 127 (78.9%) patients and West Nile meningitis was diagnosed in 34 (21.1%) cases. Leukocytosis was found in 45.9% patients. CRP level higher than 100 mg/L was registered only in those with encephalitis (p=0.020). CSF leukocyte count was 146±171 per microlitre, with slight lymphocytic predominance (mean 52%). Hypoglycorrhachia was registered in 9.3% of our patients with WNND. Twenty-eight (17.4%) patients died and all of them had encephalitis. Independent predictors of fatal outcome in WNND were serum CRP > 100 mg/L (p=0.011) and CSF proteins > 1 g/L (p=0.002).

Conclusions: WNND usually affects older males. Prolonged neutrophilic predominance in CSF can occasionally be present, as well as hypoglycorrhachia. Patients with encephalitis, high serum CRP and high CSF protein level have a higher risk of fatal outcome.

Open access

Jelena Jordovic, Ksenija Bojovic, Jasmina Simonovic-Babic, Vladimir Gasic, Nikola Kotur, Branka Zukic, Marija Vukovic, Sonja Pavlovic, Ivana Lazarevic, Ivana Bekic, Natasa Nikolic, Aleksandar Uroševic, Nikola Mitrovic and Dragan Delic

Summary

Background: Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a significant cause of liver related morbidity and mortality worldwide. The role of genetics in the host response to hepatitis C virus is not elucidated. Genetic variations in UGT1A1 gene are the most common cause of hereditary unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia-Gilbert syndrome. This is the first study investigating the association of UGT1A1 TA repeats promoter genotypes with the degree of liver injury, viremia and biochemical markers in CHC patients with advanced liver injury and late virological relapse.

Methods: Genetic testing of UGT1A1 TA repeats promoter genotypes was performed in 42 CHC patients with advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis who achieved sustained virological response and 42 healthy blood donors. CHC patients were evaluated for clinical findings, laboratory tests and imaging.

Results: UGT1A1*28 genotype (7/7 TA repeats) was observed in 23.8% CHC patients and 16.7% healthy controls with no significant difference in genotype frequencies (p=0.49). Pretreatment levels of ferritin and bilirubin were associated with the presence of UGT1A1*28 genotype, indicating its potential as a predictive marker. However, in our study, there was no correlation of UGT1A1*28 genotype with the degree of fibrosis or viremia. During antiviral treatment, dose reductions and treatment interruptions, as well as treatment success and occurrence of late virological relapse were not related to the presence of UGT1A1*28 genotype in CHC patients with severe liver injury.

Conclusions: Frequencies of UGT1A1*28 genotype are high in both Serbian CHC patients and healthy subjects. The presence of UGT1A1*28 genotype was not associated with ribavirin-related adverse effects and had no effect on long term outcome in CHC patients.

Open access

Jelena Jordovic, Ksenija Bojovic, Jasmina Simonovic-Babic, Vladimir Gasic, Nikola Kotur, Branka Zukic, Marija Vukovic, Sonja Pavlovic, Ivana Lazarevic, Ivana Bekic, Natasa Nikolic, Aleksandar Uroševic, Nikola Mitrovic and Dragan Delic

Summary

Background: Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a significant cause of liver related morbidity and mortality worldwide. The role of genetics in the host response to hepatitis C virus is not elucidated. Genetic variations in UGT1A1 gene are the most common cause of hereditary unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia-Gilbert syndrome. This is the first study investigating the association of UGT1A1 TA repeats promoter genotypes with the degree of liver injury, viremia and biochemical markers in CHC patients with advanced liver injury and late virological relapse.

Methods: Genetic testing of UGT1A1 TA repeats promoter genotypes was performed in 42 CHC patients with advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis who achieved sustained virological response and 42 healthy blood donors. CHC patients were evaluated for clinical findings, laboratory tests and imaging.

Results: UGT1A1*28 genotype (7/7 TA repeats) was observed in 23.8% CHC patients and 16.7% healthy controls with no significant difference in genotype frequencies (p=0.49). Pretreatment levels of ferritin and bilirubin were associated with the presence of UGT1A1*28 genotype, indicating its potential as a predictive marker. However, in our study, there was no correlation of UGT1A1*28 genotype with the degree of fibrosis or viremia. During antiviral treatment, dose reductions and treatment interruptions, as well as treatment success and occurrence of late virological relapse were not related to the presence of UGT1A1*28 genotype in CHC patients with severe liver injury.

Conclusions: Frequencies of UGT1A1*28 genotype are high in both Serbian CHC patients and healthy subjects. The presence of UGT1A1*28 genotype was not associated with ribavirin-related adverse effects and had no effect on long term outcome in CHC patients.