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  • Author: Agnieszka Tomczyk-Warunek x
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Bone Homeostasis in Experimental Fumonisins Intoxication of Rats

Abstract

Fumonisins are strongly toxic metabolites of Fusarium proliferatum and Fusarium verticillioides commonly present in corn-based feed. The aim of the study was to evaluate bone homeostasis in experimental fumonisins B1 and B2 intoxication of rats, a vertebrate animal model of toxicological studies, as still little is known about the possible disturbing effect of fumonisins on bone homeostasis. Adolescent (5-week-old) male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into a control group and a group FB intoxicated with fumonisins by daily intragastric administration of fumonisins at the dose of 90 mg/kg of body weight per animal in the FB group for 21 days. The fumonisin intoxication did not affect body and bone mass, although the mechanical and geometric properties were decreased in fumonisin-intoxicated rats. Bone volumetric and mineral density did not differ between groups, but bone mineral content and bone ash percentage was lower in the FB group. Detailed analysis showed that Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, Sr, and Zn bone content significantly decreased in fumonisin intoxicated rats and the alterations in structure of bone mineral phase (reduction of the apatite-bone crystals size) were noted. While the negative structural alterations in growth plate and articular cartilages were also observed, fumonisin intoxication improved histomorphometrical parameters of trabecular bone. Concluding, the dose of fumonisins used in the present study caused hepatotoxic effect, which was sufficient to trigger the disturbance in mineral homeostasis resulting in altered bone metabolism and decreased mechanical endurance.

Open access
White Tea is More Effective in Preservation of Bone Loss in Adult Rats Co-Exposed to Lead and Cadmium Compared to Black, Red or Green Tea

Abstract

Lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are toxic metals occurring commonly in the human environment that show mutagenic, genotoxic and carcinogenic effects. Dietary components could prevent heavy metals intoxication by reducing their accumulation in the body. The purpose of the study was to check possible protective effect of regular consumption of white, black, red, or green tea on bone metabolism during long-term exposure to Pb and Cd in adult rats. The 12 week-long exposure to Pb and Cd (50 mg Pb and 7 mg Cd/kg of the diet) in a rat model was studied. Twelve-week-old adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into a negative control group (Pb and Cd exposure without tea), a control (without Pb and Cd and teas), and groups co-exposed to Pb and Cd and supplemented with green, red, black, or white tea (n=12 each group). The experiment lasted for 12 weeks. The co-exposure to Pb and Cd led to the increase of bone resorption depending on the tea treatment, which was confirmed by the mechanical testing and histomorphometrical examination of cancellous bone. Pb and Cd influenced mechanical strength, reduced the densitometric and geometric parameters and the thickness of growth plate and articular cartilages. Concluding, white tea exerted the best protective effect on bone tissue and hyaline cartilage against heavy metal action.

Open access