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  • Author: Agnieszka Jatczak-Gaca x
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Abstract

Background/Aim

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is characterized by the occurrence of multisystem tumors. The objective of this study was to analyze the demographic and oncological profile of 830 NF1-individuals regarding prevalence, type, and spectrum of malignancy.

Patients and methods

The medical records of patients diagnosed with NF1 with a median age of 22.1 years (range: 0.8–81.6 years) who were followed up for malignancies from 1999 to 2018 were retrospectively reviewed.

Results

The prevalence of malignancy occurring in patients diagnosed with NF1 was 34.8% (289/830). The most common types of neoplasia encompassed tumors strictly associated with NF1, including plexiform neurofibromas (PNF; 200/830; 24.1%) and optic pathway gliomas (91/830; 11%). The prevalence of PNFs-transforming to malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) was 3.5% (7/200). The prevalence of other tumors was 4.8% (40/830). One patient was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), thus the risk of hematological malignancies among all patients with NF1 was 0.1% (1/830). In the population of patients with malignancies, 43/289 (14.9%) individuals were diagnosed with more than one malignancy.

Conclusions

The odds ratio (OR) of malignancy in a studied cohort of patients with NF1 was 23 (p < 0.001), while the OR of hematological malignancy was 5.1 (p = 0.1) in comparison with the general population.

Abstract

Introduction

Leukemia belong to 31% of all childhood malignancies. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent type of pediatric leukemia accounting for 80–85% of all cases. Progress in diagnostics and therapy of leukemia is dependent on international cooperation. The objective of the study was the analysis of non-hematological toxicity during intensive chemotherapy according to two consecutive intercontinental protocols.

Patients and methods

A total number of 210 children diagnosed for ALL who were treated in single center between 2002 and 2018 were divided in two groups defined by therapeutic protocol: ALL IC-BFM 2002 (group 1) and ALL IC-BFM 2009 (group 2). Data were entered prospectively from 2002 into international ALL IC-BFM 2002 and ALL IC-BFM 2009 registry. Non-hematological toxicity was analyzed according to the criteria followed in protocols, compatible with CTCAE criteria.

Results

The most frequent toxicities included hepatic toxicity with transaminitis and hyperbilirubinemia, infections, oral mucositis and gut toxicity with vomiting, and/or diarrhea. Non-hematological toxicity episodes calculated as a ratio per patient were comparably often observed in both the groups; however, the distribution was different. There were more grade III and less grade II toxicities. This was mainly related to significant increase in the rates of infections and transaminitis. However, there was a significant decrease in vomiting and central and peripheral neurotoxicity.

Conclusions

Intensive treatment of ALL is burdened with frequent severe toxic and infectious complications. Further progress in therapy of pediatric ALL is dependent on sophisticated supportive therapy and very well experienced and knowledgeable therapeutic team.