Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Agim Poshka x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Agim Poshka

Abstract

The issue of hate speech is widely present in the Balkan Peninsula and although it has a serious impact in inter-ethnic and inter-religious relations, it has never been addressed properly by the academia or the judicial systems. This paper aims to outline the main principles that define hate speech from the linguistic and legal perspective. Throughout the paper several international cases of hate speech are cited along with the measures that western European countries take in order to minimize the level of stereotypes and public discrimination. In the second part, the paper brings examples from degrading hate speech cases coming from public figures in Macedonia. In addition, a few comparative cases from the international practice have been cited in order to perceive if an egalitarian society is possible in Macedonia from the aspect of language usage without the hatred constituents by aiming to develop an acceptable public discourse for all.

Open access

Agim Poshka

Abstract

In the field of language education there are 4 basic skills that are essential in the process of teaching and learning: reading, writing, listening and speaking. In many teaching methodology publications, all these skills are integrated in one particular learning context. However, in the cultural context of Macedonia, although the reality is multicultural there is an element that shadows almost every learning/teaching material and that is the cultural aspect. It is important to be aware that treating culture as a fifth skill widens the horizon of teaching foreign languages which might be interesting and thorny at the same time in the SEEU context. In the last part of the paper, besides the data interpretation and the conclusion, a list of some well known teaching techniques and practices in foreign language methodology is provided.

Open access

Agim Poshka

Abstract

This paper reflects on the interaction that language and economy have in society versus an ethnocentric approach that sees other languages as challenges instead of an opportunity. The paper analyses the role that bilingualism has in the economy and how economy can impact the promotion of flexible language policies in order to open new markets. Throughout the discourse a strong focus is placed on the dilemma: can language impact and make economy beneficial? The study aims to explore how multicultural societies which often have one dominant language can benefit by opening language diversity to the business habitat with a specific focus on particular linguistic and economic developments in the Balkans after the fall of Yugoslavia. In the second part this global issues are analyzed in the local context. The study brings examples from Macedonia on how the private sector is much more advanced and innovative compared to the state institution. During this discourse few corporations active in Macedonia are analyzed in order to size the positive impact that flexible usage of language has on the economy and how state institutions can replicate this positive model. Other factors such as culture and the neurolinguistics studies have been considered as well.