Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: A.L. Ahmad x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

A.L. Ahmad, N. Ideris, B.S. Ooi, S.C. Low and A. Ismail

Abstract

Understanding a membrane’s morphology is important for controlling its final performance during protein immobilization. Porous, symmetric membranes were prepared from a polyvinylidene fluoride/N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone solution by phase inversion process, to obtain membrane with various microsized pores. The concentration and surface area of aprotein dotted on the membrane surface were measured by staining with Ponceau S dye. The dotted protein was further scanned and analysed to perform quantitative measurements for relative comparison. The intensity of the red protein spot and its surface area varied depending on the membrane pore size, demonstrating the dependence of protein immobilization on this factor. The membrane with the smallest pore size (M3) showed the highest protein spot intensity and surface area when examined at different protein concentrations. An increase in the applied protein volume showed a linearity proportional trend to the total surface area, and an uneven round dot shape was observed at a large applied volume of protein solution.

Open access

A.L. Ahmad, H.N. Mohammed, B.S. Ooi and C.P. Leo

Abstract

Porous superhydrophobic layer of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was created by a simple approach on the Poly(vinylidenefluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membranes. Acetone and ethanol mixtures with different volume ratios were used as the non-solvent on the coating surface. A 5:1 (v/v) acetone/ethanol ratio provided a porous surface with a 152° ± 3.2 water contact angle. The high contact angle could reduce membrane wettability for better carbon dioxide capture when the membrane was used as gas-liquid contactor in absorption processes. To assess the effect of the created superhydrophobic layer, the pristine and modified membranes were tested in a CO2 absorption system for ten days. The results revealed that the absorption flux in the modified membrane was higher than that of pristine membrane.

Open access

A.L. Ahmad, I. Idris, C.Y. Chan and S. Ismail

Abstract

This research emphasizes eloquently on membrane technology for treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) as it is the Malaysia’s largest and most important agro based industry. Findings established significant quality improvement with an efficient recovery of water from palm oil mill via innovative membrane application. Conventional bio-methods, whilst adhering to the Department of Environment’s (DOE) discharge regulations, produces brownish liquid which pales in comparison to the crystal clear water obtained through membrane treatment. The pre-treatment process consists of coagulation-flocculation using green environmental coagulant bases such as Moringa oleifera (MO) seeds. The ultrafiltration polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) and thin film composite (TFC) reverse osmosis were vital for the membrane processes. The system gave 99% suspended solids reduction in suspended solid and 78% of water present was successfully recovered. This technology guarantees water recovery with drinking water quality; meeting the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) standard or could be recycled into the plant with sludge utilization for palm oil estates, thus enabling the concept of zero discharge to be executed in the industries. In addition, green and healthy antioxidants such as oil and beta-carotene can be recovered from POME further demonstrate. Silica gel showed better performance in separation of carotenes from oil at temperature 40°C using adsorption chromatography with 1154.55 ppm. The attractiveness of this technology, enabling the utilization of reuse of agricultural waste into potentially value added products.