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  • Author: A. D. Yanchuk x
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Abstract

A simulation model was developed to examine optimum patterns of deploying selected clones in the hypothetical situations of both a currently known pest and an unknown future pest. We modelled the interactions between Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), an economically important forest tree in British Columbia and the northwestern U.S., and the spruce terminal weevil (Pissodes strobi (Peck)), a major pest in western spruces. The model is combined with the Province of British Columbia’s Tree and Stand Simulator (TASS) model to drive individual tree growth and stand establishment and development. Two clonal-sampling strategies are examined: a randomly drawn set of genotypes or clones, to depict the potential consequences of a new (e.g., exotic) or a previously unimportant natural pest attacking a ‘random’ set of genotypes, and a ‘fixed’ set of clones, emulating a ‘commercial’ or known set of clones for growth and resistance mechanisms. Simulations use a range of numbers of genotypes or clones (2, 6, 18 and 30), and three deployment patterns (a random mixture of ramets, single- clone blocks, and a mosaic of smaller clonal blocks), in one and five hectare (Ha) stands. Total merchantable timber volume on a per Ha basis at harvest age 80 is used to compare the various combinations and schemes. With both random and fixed chosen sets of clones, the random planting pattern (i.e., random mixture of ramets from the clonal set) produced the most volume. Eighteen randomly chosen clones generally produced more volume, than 2, 6 and 30 clones, but differences among 6, 18 and 30 clones were small in most cases, irrespective of planting pattern. For fixed clones, the use of more resistant clones with higher growth potential produced more volume; however, pure clonal blocks of the best clone were not better than a mixture of that clone and an inferior one. Reducing the effects of insect activity and attack on trees, by lowering the average annual temperature in the model, or turning off all insect ‘activity’, increased merchantable volume but did not change the optimum number of clones (~18) or deployment pattern (random mixture). Forestry agencies can weigh these findings against economic advantages of block plantings of similar genotypes, in the choice of an appropriate number of clones and a deployment strategy.

Abstract

Non-spatial and spatial analyses were carried out to study the effects on genetic parameters in ten-year height growth data across two series of 10 large second-generation full-sib progeny trials of western hemlock [Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.] in British Columbia. To account for different and complex patterns of environmental heterogeneity, spatial single trial analyses were conducted using an individual-tree mixed model with a two-dimensional smoothing surface with tensor product of B-spline bases. The spatial single trial analysis, in all cases, showed sizeable lower Deviance Information Criterion values relative to the non-spatial analysis. Also, fitting a surface displayed a consistent reduction in the posterior mean as well as a decrease in the standard deviations of error variance, no appreciable changes in the additive variance, an increase of individual narrow-sense heritability, and accuracy of breeding values. The tensor product of cubic basis functions of B-spline based on a mixed model framework does provide a useful new alternative to model different and complex patterns of spatial variability within sites in forest genetic trials. Individual narrow-sense heritabilities estimates from the spatial single trial analyses were low (average of 0.06), but typical of this species. Estimated dominance relative to additive variances were unstable across sites (from 0.00 to 1.59). The implications of these estimations will be discussed with respect to the western hemlock genetic improvement program in British Columbia.

Abstract

Eucalyptus fastigata is currently the most promising species of eucalypt planted in New Zealand due to its better disease resistance and wood machinability. A breeding programme for E. fastigata was established in New Zealand in 1979 with the planting of a progeny/provenance trial series containing material collected from native Australian provenances and 2nd generation local land race material from New Zealand and South African populations. A second series containing additional Australian and South African material was planted in 1994.

Landrace material from New Zealand did not perform well compared to Australian and South African populations, suggesting early introductions to New Zealand originated from poor seed sources and/or suffered from inbreeding. Analysis of these trials has provided base genetic parameters for this species providing direction for the next generation of the breeding programme. Predicted genetic gains of 15% for tree form and diameter for the 1979 series, and gains of 8% for diameter and 12% for malformation for the 1994 series, indicate the potential for increases in both tree form and growth rate.

Abstract

A computer simulation was conducted to investigate the accuracy of ranking individual trees in field tests of different designs. A test population that consists of 900 trees from 45 full-sib families generated by three 6-parent disconnected half-diallels was considered. One incomplete block design with single-tree plots and four complete block designs with 1, 2, 4, and 10-tree row plots were examined. Various narrow-sense heritabilities, site variation patterns (patch sizes and gradient slopes), and two levels of dominant to additive genetic variance ratios (0 and 0.30) were evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of ranking depends more on the heritability of the trait and less on the magnitude of the dominant genetic variance, site variation patterns, and field designs. With patchy site variation, differences in ranking accuracy were observed for different designs, but became smaller with higher heritabilities. Impact of environmental gradient on the accuracy of individual ranking was negligible. Incomplete block design with single-tree plots (ICB1) provided the most accurate ranking when heritability was low while complete block design with 2-tree plots (RCB2) appeared to be the best when heritability was high. Large row plot designs were among the least effective in all the simulated scenarios. For traits with medium heritabilities, the statistical efficiencies of ICB1 and RCB with 1 and 2-tree plots are comparable.

Abstract

Genetic improvement of Douglas-fir in New Zealand was initiated in 1955 with large provenance trials established in the late 1950’s. These trials illustrated that material from the coast of Oregon and California grew faster than other provenances tested. Further collections were made to evaluate provenance and familylevel performance from these two areas, and in 1996 additional trials were established at four low-altitude sites across New Zealand. Genotype×environment (GxE) interaction among these sites was found to be important for diameter at breast height (DBH), less important for stem straightness and malformation and not important for outerwood acoustic velocity (a surrogate for wood stiffness). Heritabilities were low to moderate for all growth traits, and very low for malformation. Heritability for needle cast due to Swiss needle cast, measured as needle retention on the one site where infection was relatively high, was moderate at 0.37, and was likely a major factor creating GxE interactions for growth among sites. The heritability of wood acoustic velocity was moderate to high at individual sites (0.26-0.74) and across sites (0.49). Individual- trait selection revealed the potential for good genetic gains to be made when selecting the top 20 families for diameter growth (an average of 10.7%), straightness (an average of 11.5%) and acoustic velocity (an average of 7.0%). When we examined predicted genetic gains while selecting for needle retention and/or DBH, we found that selecting for needle cast at the affected site did not compromise DBH gains at that site. Selecting for genotypes with low needle cast at the affected site did, however, reduce gains for DBH estimated across all sites. In order to maximise gains across the current Douglas-fir growing estate, a division of growing sites between those known and predicted to be affected by needle cast and those not affected would seem appropriate. This is particularly relevant given recent climate modelling work suggests that Swiss needle cast will become more important in the South Island, and even more destructive in the North Island of New Zealand. We suggest addressing differences in site through the development of separate deployment populations.

Abstract

Spatial environmental heterogeneity are well known characteristics of field forest genetic trials, even in small experiments (<1ha) established under seemingly uniform conditions and intensive site management. In such trials, it is commonly assumed that any simple type of experimental field design based on randomization theory, as a completely randomized design (CRD), should account for any of the minor site variability. However, most published results indicate that in these types of trials harbor a large component of the spatial variation which commonly resides in the error term. Here we applied a two-dimensional smoothed surface in an individual-tree mixed model, using tensor product of linear, quadratic and cubic B-spline bases with different and equal number of knots for rows and columns, to account for the environmental spatial variability in two relatively small (i.e., 576 m2 and 5,705 m2) forest genetic trials, with large multiple-tree contiguous plot configurations. In general, models accounting for site variability with a two-dimensional surface displayed a lower value of the deviance information criterion than the classical RCD. Linear B-spline bases may yield a reasonable description of the environmental variability, when a relatively small amount of information available. The mixed models fitting a smoothed surface resulted in a reduction in the posterior means of the error variance (σ2 e), an increase in the posterior means of the additive genetic variance (σ2 a) and heritability (h 2 HT), and an increase of 16.05% and 46.03% (for parents) or 11.86% and 44.68% (for offspring) in the accuracy of breeding values, respectively in the two experiments.