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  • Author: Péter Balázs Oltean x
  • Clinical Medicine, other x
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Noninvasive Assessment of Coronary Arteries in Patients with Hematologic Disorders

Abstract

Hematological conditions and their treatments have an increased risk of cardiovascular events, and invasive interventions have a higher risk of periprocedural complications in this group of patients. The aim of this review was to evaluate the risk of invasive interventions in patients with hematologic disorders and to underline the role of noninvasive cardiovascular screening in patients with hematological disorders such as Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, anemia, hemophilia, thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, and leukemia. Based on present knowledge in the field, our opinion is that the screening of patients with hematological diseases is very important to reduce the morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular events. Noninvasive assessments are suitable for this purpose with a significantly lower risk compared to invasive interventions.

Open access
The Role of Carotid Ultrasonography in Patients with High Risk of Atherosclerosis

Abstract

Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease that most often affects the carotid arteries. Being usually asymptomatic in its early stages, it is diagnosed only in advanced stages, when treatment is more difficult and prognosis is poor. Carotid ultrasound (US) is the most commonly used method for diagnosing carotid artery disease and represents a proper method for screening in patients with cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. This paper shows the methodology and necessity of carotid imaging methods in patients at high risk of developing atherosclerotic lesions. We also review the findings that underline the need of carotid screening in patients with ischemic heart disease or with ischemic arteriopathy, showing that the carotid arteries are like ‘mirrors’ of the arterial system, which need to be assessed in every patient with CV risk factors, regardless of the presence or absence of symptoms.

Open access
Imaging-derived Biomarkers Associated with Atrial FIBROsis, Structural Remodeling and the Risk of Cardioembolic Events in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation – the FIBROS Study

Abstract

Recent studies demonstrated that despite restoration of the sinus rhythm, patients with a positive history of atrial fibrillation (AF) are still at risk of thromboembolic events. The primary objective of this study is to identify new imaging-derived biomarkers provided by modern imaging technologies, such as cardiac computed tomography angiography, delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging, or speckle tracking echocardiography, as well as hematological biomarkers, associated with the risk of intracavitary thrombosis in patients with AF, in order to identify the imaging-derived characteristics associated with an increased risk of cardioembolic events. Imaging data collected will be post-processed using advanced techniques of computational modeling, in order to fully characterize the degree of structural remodeling and the amount of atrial fibrosis. The primary endpoint of the study is represented by the rate of thromboembolic events. The rate of cardiovascular death, the rate of major adverse cardiovascular events, and the rate of AF recurrence will also be determined in relation to the degree of structural remodeling and atrial fibrosis.

Open access
Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Myocardial Function Following Intracoronary and Intramyocardial Stem Cell Injection

Abstract

Stem cell-based therapy is a new therapeutic option that can be used in patients with cardiac diseases caused by myocardial injury. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new noninvasive imaging method with an increasingly widespread indication. The aim of this review was to evaluate the role of cardiac MRI in patients with myocardial infarction undergoing stem cell therapy. We studied the role of MRI in the assessment of myocardial viability, stem cell tracking, assessment of cell survival rate, and monitoring of the long-term effects of stem cell therapy. Based on the current knowledge in this field, this noninvasive, in vivo cardiac imaging technique has a large indication in this group of patients and plays an important role in all stages of stem cell therapy, from the indication to the long-term follow-up of patients.

Open access
Persistent Left Superior Vena Cava Associated with Hemiazygos Vein Draining in It and Absence of Left Brachiocephalic Vein, in a Patient with Congenital Heart Defect

Abstract

Persistent left superior vena cava is an anomalous vein that derives from a malfunction of obliteration of the left common cardinal vein during intrauterine life. The diagnosis can be suggested by a dilated coronary sinus as seen in echocardiography, or other imagistic methods. Due to the lack of hemodynamic impairment, and consequently with few or no symptoms, this vascular anomaly is frequently discovered incidentally. In this brief report we present the case of a 35-year-old male known with a complex congenital cardiovascular malformation that included atrial septum defect, persistent left superior vena cava and anomalous right pulmonary vein drainage in the PLSVC, diagnosed with sinoatrial block that required pacemaker implantation. Due to the patient’s medical history, investigations to decide the best approach needed for pacemaker implantation were performed, including a thoracic CT that incidentally found additional anomalies — the hemiazygos vein draining in PLSVC and the lack of the left brachiocephalic vein.

Open access