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  • Author: Michał Marzec x
  • Geosciences x
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Abstract

The reliability of removal of selected contaminants in three technological solutions of the household sewage treatment plants was analysed in this paper. The reliability of the sewage treatment plant with activated sludge, sprinkled biological deposit and hybrid reactor (activated sludge and immersed trickling filter) was analyzed. The analysis was performed using the Weibull method for basic indicators of impurities, BOD5, COD and total suspended solids. The technological reliability of the active sludge treatment plant was 70% for BOD5, 87% for COD and 66% for total suspended solids. In the sewage treatment plant with a biological deposit, the reliability values determined were: 30% (BOD5), 60% (COD) and 67% (total suspended solids). In a treatment plant with a hybrid reactor, 30% of the BOD5 and COD limit values were exceeded, while 30% of the total suspended solids were exceeded. The reliability levels are significantly lower than the acceptable levels proposed in the literature, which means that the wastewater discharged from the analysed wastewater treatment plants often exceeds the limit values of indicators specified in currently valid in Poland Regulation of the Minister of Environment for object to 2000 population equivalent.

Abstract

A comparison of two methods of radiocarbon age determination of groundwater is presented. The simplest Pearson model and the “user-defined” option of the NETPATH program were considered. Both methods were used to determine the age of water from a PZ-2 piezometer that is situated in the foreground of chamber Z-32 in Wieliczka Salt Mine. Results of these calculations clearly demonstrate that 14C ages obtained by the Pearson model can be significantly overestimated in comparison with those determined by the NETPATH code. Without additional data, such as the stable isotope composition of the water, conclusions on the age of the groundwater based solely on the Pearson model may be highly inadequate.

Abstract

The study investigated the efficiency of removal of iron, manganese and indicator bacteria from potable groundwater by using carbonate-silica rock (opoka). The tests were performed in a laboratory in three filter columns supplied with water containing increased concentrations of iron and manganese. Two of the columns were filled with carbonate-silica rock with particle sizes of 2-5 mm; retention time for water in the columns was set at 1 h and 2 h. A third column was filled with 1-2 mm rock particles, with hydraulic retention time set at 1 h. High removal efficiencies were determined for iron, manganese and coliform bacteria and low removal efficiencies for psychro- and mesophilic bacteria. An increase in the alkalinity of the investigated water was also observed.

Abstract

The sixth edition of the Polish Soil Classification (SGP6) aims to maintain soil classification in Poland as a modern scientific system that reflects current scientific knowledge, understanding of soil functions and the practical requirements of society. SGP6 continues the tradition of previous editions elaborated upon by the Soil Science Society of Poland in consistent application of quantitatively characterized diagnostic horizons, properties and materials; however, clearly referring to soil genesis. The present need to involve and name the soils created or naturally developed under increasing human impact has led to modernization of the soil definition. Thus, in SGP6, soil is defined as the surface part of the lithosphere or the accumulation of mineral and organic materials permanently connected to the lithosphere (through buildings or permanent constructions), coming from weathering or accumulation processes, originated naturally or anthropogenically, subject to transformation under the influence of soil-forming factors, and able to supply living organisms with water and nutrients. SGP6 distinguishes three hierarchical categories: soil order (nine in total), soil type (basic classification unit; 30 in total) and soil subtype (183 units derived from 62 unique definitions; listed hierarchically, separately in each soil type), supplemented by three non-hierarchical categories: soil variety (additional pedogenic or lithogenic features), soil genus (lithology/parent material) and soil species (soil texture). Non-hierarchical units have universal definitions that allow their application in various orders/types, if all defined requirements are met. The paper explains the principles, classification scheme and rules of SGP6, including the key to soil orders and types, explaining the relationships between diagnostic horizons, materials and properties distinguished in SGP6 and in the recent edition of WRB system as well as discussing the correlation of classification units between SGP6, WRB and Soil Taxonomy.