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  • Author: M. Urda-Dolinská x
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Comparison of two in vitro methods for the detection of ivermectin resistance in Haemonchus contortus in sheep

Summary

Gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes in sheep cause severe economic losses. Anthelmintics are the most commonly used drugs for prophylaxis and therapy against parasitic helminths. The problem of drug resistance has developed for all commercially available anthelmintics in several genera and classes of helminths. In vitro and in vivo tests are used to detect anthelmintic resistance. Two in vitro methods (larval migration inhibition test and micromotility test) for the detection of ivermectin (IVM) resistance were compared using IVM-resistant and IVM-susceptible isolates of Haemonchus contortus. The degree of resistance for each test was expressed as a resistance factor (RF). The micromotility test was more sensitive for quantitatively measuring the degree of resistance between susceptible and resistant isolates. The RFs for this test for IVM and eprinomectin ranged from 1.00 to 108.05 and from 3.87 to 32.32, respectively.

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Gastrointestinal helminth infections of dairy goats in Slovakia

Summary

The aim of this study was to identify the most common gastrointestinal (GI) parasites in flocks of dairy goats on 30 farms in Slovakia. A total of 944 adult goats were examined during the pasturing seasons for 2014 – 2016. Eggs from one or more species of gastrointestinal parasites were identified in 906 of the samples (95.90 %). Strongyle eggs were present in most of the samples (92.00 %), followed by Strongyloides papillosus (14.05 %), Trichuris spp. (7.84 %), Nematodirus spp. (3.98 %), and Moniezia spp. (2.65 %). The counts of strongyle eggs per gram of faeces ranged from 0 to 11 000. Subsamples from each farm were used to prepare faecal coprocultures to identify the genera of the nematodes. Third-stage larvae of Trichostrongylus spp. (100 %) and Teladorsagia/Ostertagia spp. (96.60 %) were present on most of the farms, followed by Oesophagostomum spp./Chabertia ovina (86.60 %) and Haemonchus contortus (76.60 %). Teladorsagia/Ostertagia spp. were the dominant genera on 60 % of the farms.

Open access