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  • Author: Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas x
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Gilmar Weber Senna, Bernardo Minelli Rodrigues, Daniel Sandy, Estevão Scudese, Antonino Bianco and Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas

Abstract

The aim of the study was to compare the effect of three distinct rest period lengths between sets of upper body single-joint exercise with different load zones and volume designed for either endurance or hypertrophy (50% or 80% of 1-RM). Sixteen trained men (20.75 ± 2.54 years; 76.35 ± 5.03 kg; 176.75 ± 3.33 cm, 24.53 ± 1.47 kg/m2) performed a test and retest of 1-RM on non-consecutive days. Forty-eight hours after load testing, the participants were randomly assigned to six sessions consisting of four sets of the triceps pull-down, combining different intensities with distinct rest periods between sets. The shorter 1 minute rest promoted a significant reduction in the total repetition number compared to 3 minute rest for both workloads. There was a difference between 3 and 5 minute conditions for the 50% of 1-RM that did not occur for the 80% of 1-RM condition. Both intensities presented significant interaction values for the rest conditions vs. each set (50% p = 0.0001; 80% p = 0.0001). Additionally, significant values were found for the main effect of the performance of subsequent sets (50% p = 0.003; 80% p = 0.001) and rest conditions (50% p = 0.0001; 80% p = 0.0001). In conclusion, for heavier loads (80%) to fatigue, longer rest of 3 to 5 minutes seems to allow for better recovery between sets and thus, promotes a greater volume. However, when training with lighter loads (50%), the magnitude of the rest seems to directly affect the performance of subsequent sets, and also presents a correlation with total volume achieved for the upper body single-joint exercise scheme.

Open access

Renato Tavares Fonseca, Rodolfo De Alkmim Moreira Nunes, Juliana Brandão Pinto de Castro, Vicente Pinheiro Lima, Sérgio Gregorio Silva, Estélio Henrique Martin Dantas and Rodrigo Gomes De Souza Vale

Abstract

Purpose. To compare the effects of aquatic and land plyometric training on the vertical jump (VJ) and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in soccer players. Methods. Twenty-four male soccer players aged 16-18 years (16.53 ± 0.5 years) were randomly divided into three groups: aquatic plyometric training (APT) (n = 8; age: 16.4 ± 0.4 years; body mass: 68.3 ± 7.54 kg; height: 179.75 ± 8.13 cm); land plyometric training (LPT) (n = 8; age: 16.5 ± 0.5 years; body mass: 68.2 ± 7.8 kg; height: 177.0 ± 7.4 cm); and control group (n = 8; age: 16.7 ± 0.6 years; body mass: 61.2 ± 6.5 kg; height: 171.43 ± 5.75 cm), not performing any jump program. An identical training program was applied for 6 weeks, totalling 944 jumps. The VJ was evaluated on a leap jump platform and the Visual Analogue Scale measured the change in DOMS perception. Results. There was a significant increase in the VJ height in both experimental groups (LPT and APT) (p < 0.05). A significant reduction in DOMS perception was verified for the APT group in comparison with the LPT group (p < 0.05) between the first and last week of training. The foot contact time significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in the APT group from pre- to posttest. Significant improvements (p < 0.05) were observed in the flight time and jump speed from pre- to post-test in both LPT and APT groups. Conclusions. APT can increase the VJ height and reduce DOMS perception in soccer players.