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  • Author: Carmen Duicu x
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Iulia Armean, Carmen Duicu, Cornel Aldea and Lorena Melit

Abstract

Introduction: Venous thromboembolism is a rare condition in paediatrics that included both deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Serratia marcescens is a gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family and tends to affect immunocompromised hosts.

Case report: We report the case of an 11-year-old boy, admitted in the Pediatric Clinic I from Emergency County Hospital Tîrgu Mureș, Romania with intense pain, swelling, cyanosis and claudication of the left foot. His personal history revealed a recent appendectomy. A close family was reported to have had a deep venous thrombosis. The laboratory tests, performed on the day of admission, revealed increased inflammatory biomarkers and D-dimer. Coagulation tests gave a low activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Doppler venous ultrasound and CT-exam established a diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. Anticoagulant therapy was initiated, but on the tenth day of admission, the patient developed signs and symptoms of sepsis, and the blood culture revealed Serratia marcescens. After antibiotic and anticoagulant therapy, the patient progressed favourably. The patient was a carrier of the heterozygous form of Factor V Leiden.

Conclusions: The association between deep venous thrombosis and Serratia marcescens sepsis can compromise a condition in pediatric patients.

Open access

Lorena Elena Meliţ, Cristina Oana Mărginean, Anca Georgescu and Carmen Duicu

Abstract

Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) characterized by two or more of the following: fever > 38.5 °C or <36 °C, tachycardia, medium respiratory frequency over two SD for age, increased number of leukocytes.

The following is a case of an eight months old, female infant, admitted in to the clinic for fever (39.7 C), with an onset five days before the admission, following trauma to the inferior lip and gum. Other than the trauma to the lip and gum, a clinical exam did not reveal any other pathological results. The laboratory tests showed leukocytosis, positive acute phase reactants (ESR 105 mm/h, PCR 85 mg/dl), with positive blood culture for Staphylococcus aureus MSSA. at 24 hours. Three days from admission, despite the administration of antibiotics (Vancomycin+Meronem), there was no remission of fever, and the infant developed a fluctuant collection above the knee joint. This was drained, and was of a serous macroscopic nature. A decision was made to perform a CT, which confirmed the diagnosis of septic arthritis. At two days after the intervention, the fever reappeared, therefore the antibiotic regime were altered (Oxacillin instead of Vancomycin), resulting in resolution of the fever. Sepsis in infant is a complex pathology, with non-specific symptoms and unpredictable evolution.

Open access

Iulia Armean, Lorena Elena Meliț, Iunius Simu and Carmen Duicu

Abstract

Thrombophilia represents a tendency towards excessive blood clotting and the subsequent development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE is a rare condition in children that comprises both deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). This paper reports the case of a 16-year-old girl, admitted to the Pediatrics Clinic No. 1, Tîrgu Mureș, Romania, for dyspnea, chest pain and loss of consciousness. Her personal history showed that she had had two orthopedic surgical interventions in infancy, two pregnancies, one spontaneous miscarriage and a recent caesarian section at 20 weeks of gestation for premature detachment of a normally positioned placenta associated with a deceased fetus. Laboratory tests showed increased levels of D-dimers. Angio-Computed Tomography (Angio-CT) showed multiple filling defects in both pulmonary arteries, establishing the diagnosis of PE. The laboratory tests were undertaken to assist in the diagnoses of a possible thrombophilia underlined a low level of antithrombin III. Antiphospholipid syndrome was ruled out and genetic tests revealed no specific mutation. Anticoagulant therapy was initiated with unfractionated heparin and afterwards subcutaneously low molecular heparin was prescribed for three months. Later it has been changed to oral therapy with acenocoumarol. The patient was discharged in good general status with the recommendation of life-long anticoagulation therapy. Thrombophilia is a significant risk factor for PE, and it must be ruled out in all cases of repeated miscarriage.