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Jurgita Andruškienė, Šarūnė Barsevičienė, Lijana Dvarionaitė, Jūratė Grubliauskienė and Asta Mažionienė

Abstract

There is a lack of data about oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among the parents of pre-school children, especially in Lithuania and the relationships among socio-economic status, oral care habits and OHRQoL. Research questions: is OHRQoL influenced by socioeconomic status or oral care habits? Research focus – oral health-related quality of life among the parents of pre-school children. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships among socioeconomic status, oral care habits and oral helath-related quality of life among the parents of pre-school children in Klaipeda. The study sample consisted of 375 parents (mother or father) of pre-school children. The questionnaire survey was conducted at randomly selected 23 kindergartens in Klaipeda city. The questionnaire consisted of sociodemographic and oral care habits questions. All the participants were examined by self-administered OIDP questionnaire, which measured oral impacts on physical, psychological and social aspects of daily performances. The highest overall impact on OHRQoL among the parents of pre-school children was observed in the domain of Carrying out major work or role (73.0), the lowest one in the Eating and enjoying food (25.74) domain. Mean OIDP score was significantly higher among the parents whose socioeconomic status was low (35.44), reflecting poorer OHRQoL, as compared with high (8.07) socioeconomic status. Parents with poor oral care habits significantly more frequently were affected (79.2%) in Smiling, laughing domain, as compared to the parents whose oral care habits were good (20.8%). Lower socioeconomic status and poorer oral care habits were related with worsened oral health-related quality of life, especially in the area of psychological performances.

Open access

Andruškienė Jurgita, Barsevičienė Šarūnė, Mažionienė Asta and Virbalienė Akvilė

Abstract

The research in the area of health sciences students’ sleep quality and mood disorders is lacking in Lithuania, as well as other European countries. The aim of this study was to compare prevalence of poor sleep, anxiety and depression among the students according to the study programmes and to assess the relations among poor sleep, depression and anxiety. The study sample consisted of 672 Klaipeda State University of Applied Sciences students (95.5% were female), from 18 to 46 years of age. Sleep quality was evaluated by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, anxiety by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, sociodemographic questions were used. The chi-square test or Fisher exact test was used to estimate association between categorical variables. P-values less than 0.05 were interpreted as statistically significant. Poor sleep was more prevalent among Beauty Therapy (26.4%, 95% CI 22.2-30.56) and Nursing (21.3%, 95% CI 17.42 – 25.17) students, as compared with persons studying in Oral Health programmes (14.8%, 95% CI 11.46 – 18.17), p<0.05. Depression mean score was higher in Beauty Therapy students (4.76), as compared to Oral Health (3.69) students, p<0.05. Beauty Therapy (9.99) or Physiotherapy students (8.24) had higher anxiety mean score, as compared to Oral Health students (7.14), p<0.05. Anxiety mean score was significantly higher (8.45) among the ones with disturbed sleep, as compared to normally sleeping students (5.86), p<0.001. Depression mean score (4.77) was higher among the students having disturbed sleep, as compared to the students which sleep was not disturbed (2.87), p<0.001. Poor sleep and anxiety were more prevalent among the students aged 20 years and older as compared to the students, aged 18 and 19 years. Second and third year students more often had poor sleep or anxiety as compared to the first-year students. Poor sleep and anxiety were more common among Beauty Therapy and Physiotherapy students than among Oral Health Students. Among the students who slept poorly, symptoms of anxiety and depression were statistically significantly more frequent than those students whose sleep was not disturbed. Depression and anxiety mean scores were statistically significantly higher among the students who had poor sleep, as compared to the ones who had normal sleep, in all age and year of studying groups.