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  • Author: Adam Piasecki x
  • Architecture and Design x
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Dynamics of the daily course of water temperature in Polish lakes

Abstract

The study focuses on short-term changes in surface water temperature in Polish lakes, and is based upon the experimental measurements of water temperature conducted every 60 minutes during the years 1971–2015. 19 lakes were selected on the grounds of their morphometric properties. The examinations were carried out in the system of expeditionary measurements (up to 8 days) and stationary measurements (over 2 months), and included temperature of surface water and its vertical distribution. The analysis of the results showed that temperature differences of water (daily amplitudes) were observed in both time and spatial distribution. The biggest differences in water temperature occurred during spring warming, and often reached 4–5°C, while rarely exceed 2°C in the remaining periods of the yearly cycle. The mean day value occurs twice; in the morning between 8:00 (7:00 GMT) and 11:00 (10:00 GMT), and in the evening at 20:00 (19:00 GMT) and 22:00 (21:00 GMT). Daily changes in the vertical distribution of water temperature are clearly visible down to the depth of 2.5–3.5 m, whereas are just perceptible to the depth of 5.5–7.0 m.

Open access
Selected aspects of water and sewage management in Poland in the context of sustainable urban development

Abstract

Effective water and sewage management is one of the most important enablers of sustainable urban development. In Poland, water and sewage management has been undergoing systematic transformation since the 1990s. This process intensified with Poland’s accession to the European Union in 2004. The aim of the work is to analyse and evaluate water and sewage management in cities in Poland in terms of sustainable development. This was made possible by selecting seven variables from which a summative index (SI) was calculated. The analysis revealed a number of positive changes that have occurred in this field. These were mainly: a decrease in water consumption in households and industry, and an increased share of wastewater treated biologically or using enhanced nutrient removal in total wastewater. An increase in SI was found in 98% of the researched cities. The largest improvement in water and sewage management took place in cities of populations below 100,000 and little industry, and in three large cities, namely Warsaw and Szczecin.

Open access