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Constanze Spieß

Abstract

Based on a dynamic, cultural-constructivist understanding of language and a multistage/ multi-level methodological approach of discourse semantics, this contribution analyzes a section of selected texts concerning the migration discourse. In this context, the controversial term Leitkultur is given special emphasis. It turns out that within political discourse this term is closely linked to self-positioning and positioning others.

Open access

Frauke Annegret Kurbacher

Abstract

In reflecting and discussing philosophical approaches on migration (almost Flusser, but also Weil, Arendt, Kant and Waldenfels) - migration could be understood (not as an extraordinary case, but) as a ‘conditio humana’ and touches the limits and possibilities of human beings. As existential experience it is in between ‘rootedness’ and ‘groundlessness’ and has therefore also a critical potential for our views of the world and our standpoints and could enlighten them as a new form of cosmopolitanism

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Gabriele Dürbeck

Abstract

The Anthropocene concept originates from earth system sciences and conceptualizes humanity as a planetary geophysical force. It links current action-oriented time horizons to Earth historical deep time and implies non-separability of natures-cultures. The Anthropocene concept has resonated in debates in natural and social sciences, the humanities and the broader public, serving as an inter- and transdisciplinary bridging concept. Based on an analysis of numerous texts from multiple scientific disciplines and media, this contribution distinguishes five narratives of the Anthropocene: the disaster narrative, the court narrative, the Great Transformation narrative, the (bio-)technological and the interdependence narrative. The five narratives articulate very different perspectives and experiences and transport divergent political, economic, ethical and anthropological values and interests; this is also shown in alternative conceptualizations such as Eurocene, Technocene, Capitalocene or Plantationocene. The analysis reveals that the narratives share significant structural characteristics concerning story, plot, protagonists, spatial and temporal structure and action-oriented emplotment which together can be referred to a meta-narrative of the Anthropocene. Since the partly overlapping, partly contradictory narratives compete for legitimation and dominance in science and the broader public, the findings raise the question whether this struggle will stabilize or undermine the Anthropocene meta-narrative in the long run.

Open access

Eva Toulouze and Nikolai Anisimov

Abstract

The authors had the opportunity, during their fieldwork, to attend spring rituals in Varkled-Böd’ya village. The week before the Great Day (Bydjynnal, coinciding with Orthodox Easter) is a dense ritual week: there are young people to be initiated, boys first and girls at the concluding ritual, who thus become adults; there are evil spirits to be chased away from the space of the living; there are kin relations to be reinforced through reciprocal visits, prayers and ritual deeds. These four rituals are the focus of this article, which provides an ethnographic account as well as a general analysis of the critical dimensions observed.

Open access

Notes and Reviews

Cultural Trauma and Diversity in Museums: A Report from São Paulo

Kirsti Jõesalu and Ene Kõresaar