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Open access

Marcin Wielgosz

Abstract

The article is an attempt to confront Lev Manovich’s soft technological determinism with two contemporary media - the smartphone and the mobile application called Instagram. The analysis is based on the characteristics of a term called “new media” identified by Manovich, with emphasis on variation and cultural transcoding. The verification of accuracy and the use of the soft technological determinism in the context of selected new media has varied by the discourse on contemporary new media and constitutes an interesting point of view. The evolution and the development of both variation and cultural transcoding (two elements conditioning their universality which continually shows an upward trend) regarding mobile media, give an opportunity to forecast their productive potential.

Open access

Adrian Rudczuk

Abstract

External marketing communication of companies is a purposeful process of transferring information to the company’s environment - society, competitors, clients and receiving their feedback. Based on the signals, the company adapts its way of communication. Choosing the most suitable type of communication may be one of the factors deciding about a company’s success. Even the best offer would not be able to attract customer’s attention if the information did not reach one. The article combines secondary data - results of the research conducted in Polish companies regarding the use of communication tools, and primary data obtained from own surveys carried out on students regarding the perception of those tools. The purpose of the article is to evaluate the perception of different communication forms by young customers.

Open access

Anna Karwacka

Abstract

Online marketing is nothing else than a model of traditional marketing in cyberspace; it is a hybrid of previous forms of mass communication. In the first decade of the 21st century, the instruments used in marketing in political communication were revolutionized by the emergence of solutions enabling the interactions of users on the Internet. This type of marketing is characterized by a range of concepts, and includes online advertising campaigns, websites, interactive social networks, video-sharing sites, which encourage users to regularly post new material, websites that enable the publication of photos, images and other files or those that are based on content provided by users i.e. Wikipedia (including blog sites). Contemporary, internetized election campaigns combine low costs with effectiveness because location no longer limits social contacts in the exchange of election-related information.

Open access

Gabriela Piechnik

Abstract

The publication presents how the Internet and new trends in modern communication influence the Polish language. Digital forms of communication provoke people to use language shortcuts, borrowings and make users do not care about language correctness. The author attempts to outline the future development of the Polish language.

Open access

Ewa Kuźniar and Nataliia Filimoniuk

Abstract

The primary aim of this article is to analyze the Twitter communication strategy and its efficiency. The authors took into consideration four Ministers of foreign affairs from Great Britain, Poland, Ukraine, and Russia (their private accounts have also been examined). However, considering that Ministers of Poland and Russia did not have their own Twitter accounts (Witold Waszczykowski and Siergiej Lawrow), authors decided to analyze private accounts of Great Britain’s and Ukrainian’s Ministers (Boris Johnson and Pavlo Klimkin). All examined profiles are accredited. Because of the popularity of Twitter and the appearance of the new type of diplomacy, which involves social networking sites, the authors attempted to make a qualitative and quantitative analysis of given accounts. The results present the effectivity index and also show that spontaneously published messages on social media have a significant impact on how state institutions convey content. What is more, the qualitative and quantitative analysis and the effectivity index allows to present the tools needed for e-diplomacy on Twitter.

Open access

János Fejes

Abstract

Extreme metal music is held to be a destructive genre of popular culture, treated as a pariah for many. Being a seriously misunderstood genre, I would like to highlight that metal music is a result of conscious work process that cannot only be noticed on the level of the music but on the level of verbal and pictorial expressions too. In my paper, I would like to show the working mechanisms of the so-called “(neo)pagan/mythological metal” movement, focusing on the rhetoric side of its mentioned expressions, searching for the ways these bands rewrite ancient myths and legends.

For my research, I will use three main threads: 1) history of religion (looking for the connections of the reception of ancient topics in contemporary society, e.g. New Age Cults and New Religious Movements); 2) reception theory, as the thoughts of Northrop Frye, Wolfgang Iser (1972), and John Fiske (2011) all should help to understand the general processes behind reading and producing texts; 3) subculture studies – e.g. the works of Richard Schusterman and Deena Weinstein (2002) to have a deeper insight to the genres standing on the edge of mass and high culture.

After a general introduction, I would like to demonstrate the above mentioned through some case studies. The chosen mythological cultures are going to be the world of the ancient Middle East (Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Old Testament), the classical Roman world, and the Viking Era, also showing some Hungarian and Romanian examples in the last section. In each section, the following issues should be examined: band and stage names connected to the topic, album titles, lyrics, and album covers. All these together will show us many clear patterns from romantic nostalgia to allegoric concepts, all revolving around the essence of metal music: being a Stranger in a familiar society.

Open access

Rozália Klára Bakó and Gyöngyvér Erika Tőkés

Abstract

With the growing importance of digital practices in young children’s everyday routines, parents and educators often face frustration and confusion. They find it difficult to guide children when it comes to playing and learning online. This research note proposes an insight into parents’ and educators’ concerns related to children’s and their own digital literacy, based on two exploratory qualitative inquiries carried out from March 2015 to August 2017 among 30 children aged 4 to 8 from Romania, their parents and educators. The research project Digital and Multimodal Practices of Young Children from Romania (2015–2016) and its continuation The Role of Digital Competence in the Everyday Lives of Children Aged 4–8 (2017–2018, ongoing) are part of a broader effort within the Europe-wide COST network IS1410 – The Digital and Multimodal Practices of Young Children (2014–2018). Parents and educators are disconnected from young children’s universe, our research has found. The factors enabling adults’ access to “Digiland” and ways of coping with the steep learning curve of digital literacy are explored through parents’ and teachers’ narratives, guided observation of children’s digital practices, and expert testimonies.

Open access

Ágnes Veszelszki

Abstract

Fake news texts often show clear signs of the deceptive nature; still, they are shared by many users on Facebook. What could be the reason for this? The paper tries to answer the question by collecting the linguistic and non-linguistic characteristics of fake news. Linguistic characteristics include among others the exaggerating, sensational title, the eye-catching, tabloid-style text, the correct or incorrect use of terms, and the fake URLs imitating real websites; non-linguistic characteristics are expressive pictures often featuring celebrities, the use of all caps, excessive punctuation, and spelling mistakes. The corpus was compiled using snowball sampling: manipulative news not originating from big news portals were collected from the social networking website Facebook. The aim of the study is to identify the characteristics of Hungarian fake news in comparison to the English ones and to elaborate a system of aspects which help identify fake news.