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Abstract

Many variants of feminism have been branded over time and that has given feminism a multiple identity. One of the new revelations of feminism in recent times is “Afropolitan Feminism”, a branch of African feminism conceived in this research to deal with the story of African women in the homeland and the Diaspora trying to assume the status of world citizens (Metropolites) to de-emphasize their origins. What is the nature of Afropolitan Feminism? What is the link between Feminism and Afropolitanism? To what extent do Adichie’s characters show the attributes of Afropolitans? This paper illuminates the concepts of feminism and Afropolitanism and the latter’s traits in Adichie’s characters in Americanah and The Thing Around Your Neck. It deals with Diaspora issues and the way African women in literary fictions try to stem the effects of global maladies like African patriarchy, Western racism and sexism. The paper further discusses social awareness and feminist tendencies displayed by the characters. It ends by noting that feminism which assumes the dimension of Afropolitanism in Adichie’s works is a becoming trend rather than a fixed norm.

Abstract

The aim of this article is an attempt to reflect on what violence is and what effects it can cause. The conventional wisdom has been that women are victims and men are perpetrators of violence and abuse. Social schemes describe women as fragile and vulnerable. However, women can be equally aggressive, dominating and use violence. Each year acts of violence against men increase and it is very important to be aware of this phenomenon. Usually men hide the fact of being abused out of fear of public stigma, felling bashful, being laughed or losing respect of their family. This paper aims to show how important this problem is and explore new ideas and possible solutions for victims of violence, as well as to improve preventive measures for abused men.

Abstract

The need to empower women seems to center on the fact that women have potentials to contribute to the development process but are constrained by some factors that render them powerless. For this reason, this study examined the impact of justice development and peace commission on women empowerment by assessing the empowerment initiatives, women participation and identifying factors that militate against full empowerment and participation of women. The theoretical background for this study is structural functionalism and the study is descriptive in nature. The study was conducted in JDPC, Ijebu-Ode and data was collected from primary and secondary sources. For primary data, IDI was conducted for 12 beneficiaries of the empowerment programmes and 6 employees of JDPC while secondary data were collected through extensive review of literature. The data collected were content analyzed. The findings revealed that not until recent empowerment programmes organized for women, women do not have the zeal for the programmes which has limited their consciousness and strength in the society. Also, awkward spending of women contributed to their failure from receiving further loans from JDPC. Equally, low level of education, tradition and belief that men are better than women affected the slow rate of empowerment of women.

Abstract

Homosexuality in Slovakia is covered in a veil of secrecy. With constant attacks by the Catholic Church and populist, traditionalist politicians, it is barely visible in society and politics, unless when discursively attacked. Similarly, homosexuality in Slovakia has failed to become a topic in the contemporary academia, with the exception of a few local works. This article, aiming to fill that gap, confronts a selection of online narratives of Slovak homosexuals via Qualitative Data Analysis through the qualitative tool, QDA Miner, including narrative analysis. Additionally, having in mind the strong propaganda of the Catholic Church against homosexuality, select homophobic narratives are analyzed via the same means.

Abstract

Within the traditional African setting, the values of an African mother in the domestic and societal ambience have called for great concerns. Akinjobi (2011, p. 2) examines African Motherhood as a sacred as well as a powerful spiritual component in the nurturing and development of an African child. The scope of this paper therefore, is to examine the position of Jimi Solanke on the values of African mothers as advocated in some of his purposively selected songs which address the values and position of motherhood as caretakers of children and strongholds in African homes. The paper adopts oral interview, the theory of Womanism and Feminism as rightly observed by Sotunsa (2008, pp. 227–234) as its methodological approaches and largely concentrates on the experience of an African mother, the family relationship as well as the importance of motherhood in her role as an African child nurturer and developer. The paper finds out that Jimi Solanke has not only appraised the values of African mothers, but also expressed severe consequences on any African child who despised or despoiled an African mother.

Abstract

In this paper, I proposed a paradigm shift in Gender-Neutral-Language. The claim, which Gender-Neutral-Language can account for reality grasping and, thus, enable its actualization, is challenged; in place of an abstract reach towards social change, a more concrete emancipatory praxis must arise. Its current emancipatory prerogatives are not confronted from the standpoint of its already-established arguments but a more comprehensive standpoint of language, more specifically, of the philosophy of language.

Abstract

The use of iconic symbols during traditional performances (dance) has remained an indispensable tool. The major problem facing the use of signifying symbols during performances is because they are seen as mere performative enhancer. These assumptions might be generally accepted, but in core dance scholarship it can be argued for or against, but this paper stands against its wrong perceived nature as mere performative enhancer. The aim of this paper is to interpret some of the signifying symbols used in dance in order to understanding their socio-cultural essence. This paper would analyze the signifying symbols used in Nkwanwite traditional dance for the following reasons: (a) To acknowledge the use of cultural symbols as part of people’s mythology belief. (b) To interpret, analyze and document the signifying symbols as a socio-communicative tool. (c) To give each of the signifying symbols relevance and interpretation in dance. In order to achieve this Sense Making Theory would be used as theoretical frame work to interrogate the essence of the signifying symbols. Findings show that, due to lack of interpretation and documentation on the use of signifying symbols in dance. It is gradually going into extinction as mere props. The paper concludes that non dance scholars should cherish and appreciate the use of symbols in dance as communicative tool.

Abstract

Humans as social animals move from being strangers to becoming intimate by taking risks of engaging in self-disclosure—from sharing insignificant bits of information to details about their beliefs, opinions, lifestyles, prejudices, and values. Romantic and intimate relationships come about when players peel away their outer layers and allow others to get closer to their core. However, as couples become more familiar, they experience certain tensions known as relational dialectics. These are autonomy versus connection, novelty versus predictability, and openness versus transparency (openness). This paper presents the findings of a survey of the perceptions about these tensions among the Hispanic-America college students (N=108). The subjects rank-order these tensions in terms of their importance, and the level of difficulty in dealing with the tensions.