Browse

1 - 10 of 294 items :

  • Sociology of Economy, Organizations, and Industry x
Clear All

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to draw attention to the importance of a strong relationship between social economy entities and their socio-institutional ecosystem. The article focuses on pointing out the importance of adequate diagnosis and the use of social capital existing in the community for the development and success of social economy initiatives. Draws attention to the importance of cooperation of these initiatives with local institutions, social organizations and representatives of local businesses as well as the level of their rooting in the minds of members of the community. The first part of the text referrers to the concept of co-production and Community-based social economy. The second part of the article presents the relation between the concept of social capital and community development and discusses the relation between the level of existing social capital in the given community and the possible development of the social economy entities operating there. The last part of the article presents practical examples of social economy entities operating in Poland, which are very often described as a ‘good practices’ of the practical implementation of different types of the idea of Social Economy. The conclusions underline that there is a need for strong rootedness and cooperation between social economy entities and the community in which it operates, based on shared values, aims and understanding of community needs and problems – building a specific space/position in the eco-system. This requires extensive relationships of social economy entities, both with individuals, public institutions and organizations operating in the local environment as well as with local values, norms, and traditions. To achieve such rootedness in case of entities that are usually established based on an external (usually institutional) decision with the strong financial support it seems to be necessary to use community work procedures as an implementation methodology. Due to the high degree of complexity of these types of projects and the need to mobilize large forces and resources, we may assume that the level of engagement of community members towards activities within a particular project usually determines its effectiveness.

Abstract

Museums are increasingly more connected to the concerns of the present-day society. In order to be actively involved in the development of the society and well-being of their communities, museums are more connected than ever, are active partners for their stakeholders. Having this new framework in mind, the present paper investigates the complex relationships between stakeholders and museums, as well as the role stakeholders could have to achieve the museum’s sustainable development. The present paper investigates how Romanian museums are using the stakeholder management approach to ensure their sustainable development. The interviews reveal why the funding bodies are considered by far the most important stakeholders. Other museums are generally ranked among the most important partners, along with local cultural organizations and educational ones. Sustainable development and increased impact on the museum’s community are constant concerns, but the main stakeholders and partners are rather narrowly considered.

Abstract

In the panorama of international strategies and commitments to sustainability, education is central to the pursuit of sustainable development. Educational institutions at all levels are playing a new role in promoting values and ideals linked to sustainable behavioral models. These models can face the complexity of reality in a cooperative, active and responsible way, leading to a vision for solidarity and progress. In this context, universities face huge challenges. They must recognize the changes happening in society and change accordingly. Universities are therefore increasingly required to actively introduce attitudes and behaviors that favor sustainable development and involve the entire academic community in this process. This paper aims to define the role of universities in sustainable development. As well as training professionals, their roles and responsibilities mean that they strongly influence the societies in which they operate. To become sustainable and ensure that their respective territories follow suit, universities must change internally and initiate systemic processes to engage all members of their communities. Moreover, dynamic bottom-up models of learning and dissemination of environmental sustainability and social responsibility should aim to encourage students to be active inside and outside their universities. After a detailed literature review, this paper explores how sustainable development should be used in educational paths as well as didactic activities to influence the way students think, act and engage within their academic communities. Based on the objective of this work, the case of the Tor Vergata University of Rome is used to describe the results of the active change.

Abstract

In this article, we summarize the dominant experiences, discussions, and judgments of Flemish SSE-organizations joining emerging public multi-actor networks to tackle the socioeconomic challenge of economic inclusion. Based on a longitudinal qualitative research track combining case-study research, focus group research and action research (i.e. pilot studies), we recently find out that the initial enthusiasm, willingness and interest of SSE-organizations to participate has gradually been replaced by emerging feelings of cautiousness, disappointment, and frictions. When considering the dominant underlying classical rational management paradigm of these networks, we can better understand the precise nature and origin of these growing frictions. As such, emerging strategic network paradigms seem to provoke serious dilemmas. Based on our research results these frictions relate to (i) the reasons for being invited to participate, (ii) the meaning of related concepts (i.e. quality, professionalism, and innovation), (iii) the assumed disturbance of competition, and (iv) the pressure of isomorphic management models.

Abstract

The research aims to analyze the role of universities to promote sustainable strategies inside and outside their academic communities. In particular, the focus is on projects promoted by the Academia that respond to the big problem regarding waste. After an analysis of the literature on the evolution of the Helix Model and the Third Mission of University, the research focuses on the analysis of the causes of the open call “Mission Sustainability” promoted by the Tor Vergata University of Rome, aiming to promote sustainable action in the territory, in a specific project involving the installation of incentivizing compactors in the Campus for PET collection. The research methodology applied to the case study, mainly qualitative, is based on the document analysis of university report and strategy planning, the call and the specific project promoted by professors and researchers titled “GREENtosi for UniRecycling purpose between Third Mission and Sustainability. A virtuous experimental partnership with a view to the quintuple helix in the socio-ecological transition context”. This case is relevant for both academic and practical aspects because it is a research application in a specific context leading to the following main results: sensitization and awareness of students, employees and the whole academic community on the problem of waste from PET plastic; involvement of stakeholders in public engagement activities for collecting waste; studying the practical application of possible benefits from the installation of compactors and increasing the sense of belonging towards the University, green and common space care.

Abstract

Natural ecosystems are extremely exposed to the ever-increasing changes in population growth and the expanded need for resources. The economic capitalization of their constituent elements makes their degradation and conversion more profitable than conserving them. Nevertheless, mankind is mindful of nature’s value, and over time has developed its policy and means of protection and conservation to help it integrate its actions so that they respect the paradigm of sustainable development. Most of the ecosystem’s functions are, also, economic. The process of determining the economic value of an ecosystem is a laborious approach that involves specific instruments that depend on many variables. These variables are induced by the innate/ natural transformations of the biogeographical environment or by particular situations generated by extreme phenomena. This study addresses the economic value of natural areas (with the example of the Bucegi Natural Park –B.N.P.) in a methodological context focused on international studies, with results in certain protected areas in Romania. The established report managed to provide an economic value obtained both from the revenues generated from the costs for visitors and jobs and through the capitalization of the non-commercial benefits. As an important element in our investigation, we took into consideration the pressures and menaces identified in protected areas. Natural activities (geological and geomorphological events, climate changes) and anthropogenic events (e.g. development of residential and commercial spaces, transport corridors and services, tourism activities) associated with negative elements (pollution, hunting and overfishing, degradation) involve costs. Dedicated by ever-changing legislation, inadequate financial support, and a faulty management approach, they tend to balance the scale against the benefits. The economic valorization of the components defining a protected natural area serves as an advantage for all involved parts. This must be performed within the limits of the actual legal framework but in the spirit of protection and respect for nature in all its’ forms.

OPEN ACCESS

Abstract

The paper is an ethnography of cultural workers from the contemporary art centre from Cluj-Napoca, Romania – The Paintbrush Factory. The one-decade existence of the alternative space contributed to a range of changes in the local cultural scene and evolved from a physical space into a resource for the city’s culture-led development strategy. It also became affected and reshaped by wider changes in terms of applied cultural policies. Cultural workers’ perspective, their precarity and their involvement in the local art scene influenced the current commodification and entrepreneurialisation of the cultural offer. The Paintbrush Factory’s expansion and contraction are vividly presented through the reflexive lenses of the cultural workers and managers, whose case-study could easily be regarded as a signal and a symbol of the deficient cultural policies mostly oriented to profit and lacking any local and long term-vision.