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Open access

Lilian Nkengla Asi and Deli Tize Teri

Abstract

Retraction of: Asi, L. & Teri, D. (2016). Influence of food taboos on nutritional patterns in rural communities in Cameroon. International Review of Social Research, 6(1), pp. 35-39. (DOI: 10.1515/irsr-2016-0005). As a precautionary measure, it has been decided that the article Lilian Nkengla Asi, Deli Tize Teri. 2016. Influence of food taboos on nutritional patterns in rural communities in Cameroon, International Review of Social Research 6(1): 35-39 (DOI 10.1515/irsr-2016-0005) to be temporary withdrawn because it was accused for containing sentences, expressions, incorrect citation and the outline of the article and some titles of some sub-sections that are copied from an article published previously in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine. We will revert to you with a final decision after analyzing the positions of the all parties involved.

Open access

Raluca Perneş

Abstract

This paper looks at a set of documents produced in the early 1950s in the Gold Coast to establish land boundaries in a region and to contribute to the crystallization of customary law for future reference and use. The material is placed in a longer historical flow and seen as one of the results of transformations in the metropole, in the colony, and in their relationship over the first decades of the century, and as a significant landmark collection that has been used in land transactions ever since. The analysis pleads for treating the archives in an ethnographic and not just in an extractive manner (Stoler, 2002, 2009), suggesting that the making, the form, the authors’ stances and the use of the documents can be useful supplementary tools in making sense of the already heavily edited representations of the past that we have access to. The focus on this particular archival material contributes to the discussions about the pitfalls of basing land management on, as Sally Falk Moore would put it, “customary” law.

Open access

László Péter

Abstract

The present article is focusing on hegemonic masculinity represented and expressed by the professional footballers. Based on the empirical study using text analysis of leading articles published in central Romanian sport newspapers I draw the ideal-typical picture of the normative model of Romanian hegemonic masculinity in which the domestic coaches play a determinant role. Their personal-individual and collective-professional features like determination, steadiness, honesty, pride, mutual respect, knowledge, tenaciousness, sense of vocation, solidarity, spirit of fighting are the corner points of the constructed Romanian manhood, or hegemonic masculinity during social change. The manliness is traced along the inner characteristic of the coaches but in strong contradiction with the foreign trainers. In this respect I can state that football is connected not only with masculinity but in some respect also with the national characteristics embodied by the Romanian coaches especially those working home.

Open access

Mircea Comşa

Abstract

Turnout decline in former communist countries has attracted a great deal of scholarly attention. In this paper, I re-test some of the previous hypotheses on new data and I propose a new hypothesis that considers the impact of external migration. Using multivariate regression models on a dataset of 272 presidential and parliamentary elections held in 30 post-communist countries between 1989 and 2012, I have found strong support for the “migration hypothesis”: other things being equal, an increase of migration rate by 1 percentage point reduces voter turnout by around 0.4 percentage points. Most of the previous hypotheses related to causes of turnout decline are supported too.

Open access

Greti-Iulia Ivana

Abstract

The aim of this article is to discuss the character of regularities occurring in informal social bonds, be they friendships, romantic partnerships, competitions or rivalries. Since Simmel’s work is emblematic for the theme of social norms involved in durable informal bonds, I take his original concept of forms of association as my point of reference. The argument I propose challenges several of Simmel’s assumptions, namely his objectivist stance, his formal sociology and the autopoiesis of systems of reciprocal effects. Based on this critical rereading of Simmel, I introduce the concept of “socially constructed typical bonds” as a more dynamic and versatile alternative to the static patterns of forms of association. By bringing a subjectivist turn (inspired by Berger, Luckmann and Butler) to Simmel’s forms of association, I argue for the recognition of the blurry, diverse and contradictory understandings of the typical social bond as the ground for relational normativity.

Open access

Audrey Lundahl

Abstract

This article explores the often overlooked work of growing food at home as food justice activism. It explores several questions, including: is home food production food activism/social justice work? How accessible is at-home food production? What are the assumptions and claims made by people who produce food at home, and what challenges do they face? Using an ecowomanist theoretical framework, the article analyzes blog posts written by four homesteading bloggers. It argues two points: that growing food at home shifts and develops a food consciousness, which leads to a more just relationship with food, and that the bloggers engage in intentional food production practices in order to bring more awareness to their individual interactions with all parts of the food system.

Open access

Mary Igenoza

Abstract

‘Femininity as Portrayed within Western Society’ is a research study that explored the ways in which femininity, what Moi (1989) defined as a set of cultural attributes assigned to the female sex, is racialized within western culture. To uncover black and white women’s racialized perceptions of femininity a total of 42 women, 22 black and 20 white women were interviewed for this research. This paper will highlight the ways in which the discipline of diet is practised within the homes of white and black women in their endeavours reflect and perform femininity. With the white respondents, the message that is communicated within their homes, through the everyday practice of their mother’s eating, was that dieting was perceived and learnt as the ‘normal’ way to eat. Within the homes of the black respondents, however, food, rather than being something that was restricted, was about sociability, something to be shared out and enjoyed.

Open access

Jacqueline Botterill

Abstract

Over 80 percent of North Americans regularly eat in the car, yet neither mobility literature nor expanding discussions of food cultures focus on the practice. Two studies shed light on eating in the car. First, North American’s distinct, dynamic, and embedded mobile food infrastructure is outlined via discussion of noteworthy innovations - from the 19th century dining car to the 21st century drive thru - that food entrepreneurs constructed to facilitate eating on the go. Second, four exploratory focus groups investigate the meanings and practices drivers associate with eating in the car. Together findings suggest that eating in the car is compromised by the demands of accelerating modernity. Framing eating in the car as simply another facet of an obesity crisis, as culinary preference, or personal choice and responsibility limits full understanding of the cultural anxieties, environmental and health risks surrounding this widespread food practice.