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Andrea Lutz

Abstract

This article studies the impact of the social position on the health trajectories of children who follow a therapy for overweight or obesity management. Based on a qualitative study conducted within a Swiss hospital with 29 families, the author explains how the social position influences children’s relationship to health norms. The study results show that children belonging to wealthy families internalize more easily the therapeutic prescriptions in their everyday lives than the children from underprivileged families.

Open access

Stéphane Cullati, Claudine Burton-Jeangros and Thomas Abel

Open access

Nadine Reibling and Katja Möhring

Abstract

This study investigates how women’s and men’s fertility history affect their health in later life and if this relationship varies across countries and cohorts. We use life history data and current health status of persons aged 50 and over from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) for 13 countries. Country-fixed effects regressions show that parenthood itself and the number of children have little impact on later life health, but fertility timing is important. Moreover, significant country and cohort differences show that the health implications of timing depend upon the socio-historic context.

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Valérie-Anne Ryser, France Weaver and Judite Gonçalves

Abstract

Based on the theory of Cumulative (Dis)Advantage over the life course, this study makes three contributions. Using the concentration index, it documents the extent to which life satisfaction (LS) is unequally distributed with respect to health status (HS) in the 50+ population of SHARE. It shows that HS, widowhood and adaptation processes are important factors that correlate significantly with these inequalities in all countries studied. Finally, this study reveals that the 50+ population across Europe experiences cumulative disadvantage, both in terms of HS and LS.

Open access

Agnes Dumas

Abstract

Gender inequalities in health may result from differences in health care utilisation. This paper reports, using an interactionist approach, health-related beliefs of men and women treated for cancer in childhood and living with increased health risks ever since. We observed that normative masculine traits are sometimes used to legitimise a reluctance to undergo medical surveillance. Overall, men tended to express a passive attitude towards ill-health, resulting in a gendered health vulnerability.

Open access

Isabel Baumann, Szilvia Altwicker-Hámori, Sibylle Juvalta, Niklas Baer, Ulrich Frick and Peter Rüesch

Abstract

We examine how type of diagnosis, educational trajectories and educational qualifications affect the employment prospects of young adults with mental disorders. We draw on a novel dataset based on data from the Swiss Federal Social Insurance Office. Our analysis shows that individuals with mental disorders that typically have an onset in early childhood, those who experience educational trajectories including special needs education, and those attaining higher levels of qualification are more likely to be employed in early adulthood.

Open access

André Berchtold, Joan-Carles Surís, Thomas Meyer and Zhivko Taushanov

Abstract

In this study we explored the development of somatic complaints among adolescents and young adults aged 16 to 30 years in Switzerland. Using data from the Transitions from Education to Employment (TREE) study, we applied a hidden Markovian model with covariates to cluster trajectories representing the sum of eight somatic complaints. The resulting groups differed mainly in terms of gender, reading literacy, and substance use. The trajectories of somatic complaints were also related to the number of critical events experienced by the respondents.

Open access

Esmeranda Manful and Michael Atakora

Abstract

In recent years with the various austerity measures put in place by governments, the main providers of welfare, funding of social protection programmes have shrunk. Yet, protecting the less fortunate has never been the preserve of the State; families, communities and civil societies had always contributed in the provisions. One of such contributors are universities, though their core mandate is to educate but in addition many universities have established schemes and scholarships to ensure access to tertiary education for students from low income families. However, as in many social interventions, including Ghana’s, there is a gap between policy intent and practice, but often the focus is on the implementors not the beneficiaries. This paper therefore presents findings from a qualitative study exploring the perceptions of participating students in the ‘work and study’ programme in KNUST using the Social Action theory to unveil the reasons underpinning actions of students who have to work. A case study research design was adopted for this study using a qualitative approach with in-depth interviewing as the method of data collection. Fifteen undergraduates, volunteered to participate in the study. Data collected were qualitatively analysed using the NVivo software. Findings from the study revealed that students had multiple reasons for joining the scheme and it was not based on the sole rational motive of earning an income. The study provides an analytical insight that predicts the behaviours of beneficiaries of social protection initiatives.

Open access

Hrvoje Jošić and Matej Metelko

Abstract

This paper presents empirical evidence on the validity of the Linder hypothesis in the case of Croatia. According to the Linder hypothesis, one of the new theories of international trade, countries with a similar level of income per capita should trade more. In order to investigate the trade pattern of Croatia's international trade, a panel regression model is formulated including 184 Croatia's import partner countries in the period from 2000 to 2016. The Linder effect was displayed and calculated using the Linder variable expressed as an absolute difference between GDP per capita of the importing and the exporting country. The cross-country panel regression model is estimated using Pooled OLS, Fixed and Random effects models. Results of the analysis have shown that the validity of the Linder hypothesis for Croatia cannot be accepted. Instead, the structure of Croatia's trade is in line with the gravity model of international trade.

Open access

Matei Gheboianu and Bogdan Murgescu

Abstract

Student assessment of professors emerged in the context of university democratization and increasing involvement of students in the management of the higher education institutions. It was institutionalized mainly as an instrument to gradually improve the quality of teaching, and only rarely used as an element determining the hiring and firing of the academic staff. In Romania, it came to the forefront only in the context of the Revolution of December 1989, when students started to question the competence of their professors and asked for the removal of those whom they considered unfit. The article focuses on the concrete case of the “black list” issued by the history students in the University of Bucharest, and on the way this revolutionary challenge shaped the institutional governance and the further development of the Faculty of History. The analysis refutes attempts to consider this episode as a politically-motivated purge and to integrate it in the master-narrative of post-communist lustration. While highlighting the particularities of this case, which allowed to professionally-motivated students to initiate a major reshuffle in the functioning of a higher education institution, the authors argue that such a synthetical evaluation pattern may in fact be one of the not so uncommon ‘revolutionary’ paths towards establishing a regulated system of student assessment of professors.