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Andrea Lutz

Abstract

This article studies the impact of the social position on the health trajectories of children who follow a therapy for overweight or obesity management. Based on a qualitative study conducted within a Swiss hospital with 29 families, the author explains how the social position influences children’s relationship to health norms. The study results show that children belonging to wealthy families internalize more easily the therapeutic prescriptions in their everyday lives than the children from underprivileged families.

Open access

Stéphane Cullati, Claudine Burton-Jeangros and Thomas Abel

Open access

Nadine Reibling and Katja Möhring

Abstract

This study investigates how women’s and men’s fertility history affect their health in later life and if this relationship varies across countries and cohorts. We use life history data and current health status of persons aged 50 and over from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) for 13 countries. Country-fixed effects regressions show that parenthood itself and the number of children have little impact on later life health, but fertility timing is important. Moreover, significant country and cohort differences show that the health implications of timing depend upon the socio-historic context.

Open access

Valérie-Anne Ryser, France Weaver and Judite Gonçalves

Abstract

Based on the theory of Cumulative (Dis)Advantage over the life course, this study makes three contributions. Using the concentration index, it documents the extent to which life satisfaction (LS) is unequally distributed with respect to health status (HS) in the 50+ population of SHARE. It shows that HS, widowhood and adaptation processes are important factors that correlate significantly with these inequalities in all countries studied. Finally, this study reveals that the 50+ population across Europe experiences cumulative disadvantage, both in terms of HS and LS.

Open access

Agnes Dumas

Abstract

Gender inequalities in health may result from differences in health care utilisation. This paper reports, using an interactionist approach, health-related beliefs of men and women treated for cancer in childhood and living with increased health risks ever since. We observed that normative masculine traits are sometimes used to legitimise a reluctance to undergo medical surveillance. Overall, men tended to express a passive attitude towards ill-health, resulting in a gendered health vulnerability.

Open access

Isabel Baumann, Szilvia Altwicker-Hámori, Sibylle Juvalta, Niklas Baer, Ulrich Frick and Peter Rüesch

Abstract

We examine how type of diagnosis, educational trajectories and educational qualifications affect the employment prospects of young adults with mental disorders. We draw on a novel dataset based on data from the Swiss Federal Social Insurance Office. Our analysis shows that individuals with mental disorders that typically have an onset in early childhood, those who experience educational trajectories including special needs education, and those attaining higher levels of qualification are more likely to be employed in early adulthood.

Open access

André Berchtold, Joan-Carles Surís, Thomas Meyer and Zhivko Taushanov

Abstract

In this study we explored the development of somatic complaints among adolescents and young adults aged 16 to 30 years in Switzerland. Using data from the Transitions from Education to Employment (TREE) study, we applied a hidden Markovian model with covariates to cluster trajectories representing the sum of eight somatic complaints. The resulting groups differed mainly in terms of gender, reading literacy, and substance use. The trajectories of somatic complaints were also related to the number of critical events experienced by the respondents.

Open access

Georgina Tsolidis

Abstract

Historically, Australianness has been defined in contradistinction to its location – a British bastion in the Asia-Pacific region.A fear of being swamped by the Chinese – the ‘yellow peril’ – prompted federation, and a restrictive migration policy aimed at making Australia white. Thus, sinophobia has been significant in the national imaginary. This paper discusses how contemporary representations of Chineseness may be echoing this historic narrative of fear about being overrun. This is explored in the context of China’s shifting global significance and Australia’s growing economic relationship with China.

Open access

Paul Morris

Abstract

Is religion simply a part of culture? Can religious diversity be managed as a subset of intercultural diversity? This article explores intercultural dialogue and its relationship to “religion’ in the policies, documents and debates of the European Community. The argument is advanced that religious realities and concerns are misconstrued when religion is subsumed into culture. Religion needs to be historically and conceptually rethought and that for cultural and religious diversities to be skillfully managed in the interests of social solidarity and positive intercommunal relations both need to be addressed discretely and in tandem.