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Marcelo Jacques de Moraes

Abstract

Starting from Walter Benjamin’s reflections on the work of Marcel Proust, we intend to go back to the way they allow us to think the relations between literature and translation, the “life connections” between them. We aim to speculate more specifically on the productive dimension of aging and oblivion taken as critical setbacks, that are natural to every work - original or translation-, and that predestine, necessarily and inexorably, within the “internal forest” of each of the languages involved and the border between them, to incompleteness and “continued life”.

Open access

Romain Rivaux

Abstract

To what extent can the 1929 French translation of Ulysses be conceived of as poor ? We attempt to answer this question by looking at the 2004 retranslation, which provides the reader with a new perspective on the sometimes-debatable decisions made by the original translators. The detail of Joyce’s own annotations on the translated material also facilitates the understanding of some of these decisions. Destruction of rhythms, syntactic ennoblement, and destruction of intertextual networks count among the most obvious types of deformation that can be observed in this masterpiece of translation.

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Samer Omar Jarbou

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to investigate the determinants for choosing nominal anaphoric demonstratives in Classical Arabic (CA) by examining their usage in a corpus of CA texts. The study makes use of Ariel’s (1990; 2001) concept of ‘unity’ as a theoretical framework from which to study the relationship between an anaphoric demonstrative, its antecedent and their shared referent. This study builds on Jarbou and Migdady’s (2012) findings that ‘anaphoric distance’ (Ariel, 1990; 2001) has not been found to be a primary determinant of cognitive accessibility concerning the use of anaphoric demonstratives in CA. The results of this study show that the choice of proximal/distal anaphoric demonstratives in CA depends primarily on the ‘time frame’ of the referent. Anaphoric demonstratives are temporally anchored in the present time of interaction; if a referent existed within a past time frame or is expected to exist within a future time frame (in relation to the interlocutors’ present time), that referent has low accessibility because of non-sharedness of time frame; if a referent existed or is experienced within a present time frame, it has high accessibility due to sharedness of time frame. Temporal distance replaces physical distance as a determinant of accessibility. In the corpus, proximal anaphoric demonstratives have been used in contexts of high accessibility while distal anaphors have been used in those of low accessibility. Findings of this study contribute to the dynamic view of demonstratives that textual/physical distance is not the primary or sole determinant of accessibility concerning demonstratives.

Open access

Yuya Yokota

Abstract

Translating haiku requires some sense of context. This article examines three elements of that context: seasonal words, the society in which haiku are produced, and prose (such as journal or short story). Behind the haiku there is a particular community in which poet and reader are close to each other, allowing the haiku to communicate more than their literal meaning. Taking this into consideration facilitates their translation.

Open access

Yehudit Dror

Abstract

In the few traditional Arabic grammatical sources that address the term parentheticals it is usually defined as the insertion of a clause between two other clauses, or between two syntactic components, for taʼkīd “emphasis.” In this article I examine Qurʼānic parenthetical clauses in the theoretical framework of relevance theory. It transpires that the parenthetical clause is placed where it achieves optimal relevance and therfore the conveyed utterance does not require the addresses to waste any efforts trying to procees the information and correctly interpret it. Optimal relevance also means having a contextual effect. The Qur’ānic parenthetical clauses have one of the following contextual effects: They serve to affirm God’s omnipotence, indicating that only God produces suras, created heaven and earth. He is the forgiver and all depends on His will; to explain what it meant by a specific statement or to explain the reason behind a certain action; to qualify, to highlight a specific characterization, for example, one of the parenthetical clauses modify the Qur’ān as the truth from God; to provide background information, which could explain further developments in the narrative.

Open access

Aurelija Leonavičienė

Abstract

This article presents an analysis of the reasons and the specificities of the development of translation theory in one of the three post-Soviet Baltic countries, Lithuania, since the first half of the 20th century until 1990. The analysis considers the historical and political circumstances characterising the period of Lithuania’s Independence (1918-1940) as well as the Soviet period (1940-1941 and 1944-1990). The discussion of the development of translation theory in Lithuania helps to reveal general features relevant to the context of translation studies in Latvia and Estonia as well, because the historical and political experiences of these Baltic countries have been similar to those of Lithuania.

Open access

Renata Povolná

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to provide a cross-cultural analysis of selected linguistic realizations of persuasion in the language of technical communication represented by the genre of technical manuals (TM) and to identify the differences and similarities between the ways persuasion is expressed in this type of specialized discourse in English and Czech. More specifically, the paper attempts to discover which linguistic realizations of directives are applied to persuade the readers of the correctness of the instructions and the necessity of reading and following them. The results demonstrate that the main lexico-grammatical devices are quite similar in all the data. There are only minor frequency differences between English and Czech manuals, which are naturally reflected in their parallel Czech and English translations. The findings indicate that the quality of written instructions, including the degree of persuasiveness, is of great importance since it can influence prospective users of particular technical devices when making a choice about what to buy.

Open access

Mariana Oleniak

Abstract

This paper aims to provide an account of Old English similes of equality marked by the superlative degree of the adjective gelic. It deals with the structure and semantics of similes marked by the (ge)/(on)licost component, which, unlike in Modern English, being subjected to gradation, can show the highest degree of similarity between referents. The article presents the criteria for structural classification of the simile in question describing two major structural types, that employ nouns in the dative or nominative case, as well as its semantic interpretation from macro and micro levels of perspective. The paper examines every simile with the (ge)/(on)licost component found in Old English manuscripts belonging to various textual genres.

Open access

Rias Van Den Doel, Anne-France C. H. Pinget and Hugo Quené

Abstract

This paper investigates the evaluation of the English sounds /θ/ and /ð/ as produced by European non-native speakers. Using the data from a larger web survey, we compared the error judgements by different native and non-native users of English. This was done to establish whether there is any normative convergence among European non-native speakers, or if this was counteracted by other patterns, such as the presence or absence of these sounds in their L1s. Our analysis shows that while European non-native judges do not differ consistently from native-speakers in their judgements, there are also subtle differences between different groups of non-native speakers, implying that we should be careful not to generalise across groups about non-native attitudes to these sounds.

Open access

El-Shaddai Deva

Abstract

This paper examines the German translation of two novels by the Cameroonian author Ferdinand Oyono and goes against the normative approach adopted by so many critics of translations of African literary texts. It argues that if the German translation of Ferdinand Oyono is bad in the Bermanian conception, it is mainly because it is a good translation of an original text which means to be read as translation. Hence it is neither good, nor bad.