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Tomaž Lešnik, Timotej Jagrič and Vita Jagrič

Abstract

The paper examines the VAT gap estimated on the basis of VAT tax returns. The assessment of tax gap dependence is examined based on macroeconomic influences and the measures of the Slovenian fiscal administration. Regarding the latter, the number of audits being performed and the effects of audit activity (tax yield) have been considered. The results of the analysis support the thesis that the tax gap is reduced in conditions of economic growth. The fiscal administration measures showed the desired effect. An important factor lowering the gap was proven to be the number of (VAT) audits. A similar impact on the tax gap, although considerably smaller, was found to have effects of an audit. Audit planning might be considered as guidance for fiscal policies to lower the tax gap.

Open access

Petre Brezeanu, Florin Dumiter, Rodica Ghiur and Silvia Paula Todor

Abstract

Throughout this study, we have shown the influence factors generating a significant impact on taxpayers’ tax behavior. We also analyzed the literature in the field, and the categories of factors that have a significant influence. Consequently, we have assigned a macroeconomic indicator in Romania, in an attempt to quantify the factors of influence. In this regard, we have built an econometric model of multifactorial regression and we have determined the impact of some elements such as: poverty, labor productivity, population confidence in state authorities, gross domestic product per capita on fiscal behavior, which was estimated through the proxy variable: tax rate. The empirical results obtained as a result of the multiple regression showed that there is a negative correlation between the fiscal behavior of the taxpayer, namely the tax compliance and the financial capacity, the labor productivity and the confidence the taxpayer has in the state authorities, while the behavior of the taxpayer the gross domestic product per capita we identify a positive correlation.

Open access

Polona Tominc, Maruša Krajnc, Klavdija Vivod, Monty L. Lynn and Blaž Frešer

Abstract

Changes regarding the importance of graduates’ competences by employers and changes of competences themselves are to a great extend driven by the technological changes, digitalization, and big data. Among these competences, the ability to perform business and data analytics, based on statistical thinking and data mining, is becoming extremely important. In this paper, we study the relationships among several constructs that are related to attitudes of economics and business students regarding quantitative statistical methods and to students’ intention to use them in the future. Findings of our research provide important insights for practitioners, educators, lecturers, and curricular management teams.

Open access

Ksenija Dumičić, Ivana Skoko Bonić and Berislav Žmuk

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of the development level indicators on the e-commerce, i.e. on the online purchase by individuals, in selected European countries in 2013. In the analysis, the main variable under study and all the independent variables are included as standardised. Based on nine variables, the principal component analysis with varimax rotation was performed and the two extracted factors were used as the regressors in the multiple regression analysis. In the regression model both components, Factor 1, which includes seven variables, called Prosperity, Investing in Education and IT Infrastructure, and Awareness, and Factor 2, comprised of two variables, called IT Skills, are statistically significant at the significance level of 1%. Both factors show a positive correlation with the online purchase of individuals. Inclusion and analysis of distributions and impacts of even nine independent variables, which make up two distinct factors affecting the e-commerce, make a new contribution of this work.

Open access

Radu Lucian Blaga and Alexandru Blaga

Abstract

Buying decisions are determined by two key factors: endogenous factor that belongs to the buyer (which is present at least the attitudinal variable) and exogenous factors such demo-economic, sociological, psychological, marketing mix, linked all more or less by the product or the service offered for purchase and consumption. The study aims to use Rasch’s model to express the likelihood that a consumer will make the decision to purchase a higher educational service. Applied to item solving, Rasch probabilistic model, on which the research methodology study is largely supported, states that the probability of success in solving an item depends on two factors. The one belongs to that who solves the item - the human factor, called the latent trait, and the other belongs to the item, called the facility of the item The purchase decision approach using the Rasch model results validity is mainly based on the isometry of the two situations The results of the study describe behavioral probability situations where customers who make university education services purchasing decisions can themselves be found. We recommend the educational marketing strategies based on the analysis made on the applied model, which may increase the students’ enrolled number in a particular university.

Open access

Viorel Pop

Abstract

Petroleum is the most important resource for global energy production, far exceeding the role of coal and natural gas, the role of river energy and wind energy, and also the role of nuclear fuel.

All highly industrialized countries are making great efforts to ensure the energy needs of the functioning of economies under the conditions of fierce global competition. None of the world’s first 10-12 economies can give up on petroleum imports, and the exporting countries benefit from large financial resources from petroleum.

Saudi Arabia, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Venezuela, Russia and other petroleum-rich countries secure themselves significant foreign revenue for their economic development, defense and overall well-being.

Open access

Ioan Gh. Pop, Ioan S. Fotea and Silvia L. Fotea

Abstract

In this paper a novel approach on knowledge integration in presented in the context of the knowledge-based society/economy (KBS/E). What this paper brings new is the transdisciplinary integrative approach of the knowledge through the “conceptual knowledge space” as a potentiality, and the “practical transdisciplinary knowledge space”, as actuality, with the transition between them through the included middle. Are introduced some of the most important practical educational environmental transdisciplinary conceptual and applied spaces, as innovative groundbreaking clusters that foster the origination, transfer and implementation of knowledge in the process of achieving sustainable development of the continuously integrative society. The University is considered the most appropriate space for this transdisciplinary approach of knowledge achievement, being a natural habitat of the synergistic integration of education, research and industry, and with its adaptability and adequateness in the knowledge economy space. University should become an open space in a reconfiguration in a integration of a highrequired degree with breadth profile competence in the integrated fields of different disciplines, with the need to have a depth profile of the knowledge in research on particular cognitive field. A new redefined mission of university by collaborating with industry should be linked to a redefinition of the role of the research in universities in the knowledge based society/economy.

Open access

Magda Zupančič

Abstract

In developed economies, where the work input exceeds the physical input, the lack of harmonised and standardised rules of human capital assessment is visible. The mentioned indicates the deficit of an important part of the comprehensive value-added assessment. What do we lose by ignoring the important part of the employee’s value added in the working process? Companies underestimate the employee’s human capital input. Consequently, society typically does not recognize invisible sources of value added in companies. The goals of this article are to highlight the missing human capital (HC) element at the company level assessment and to raise the awareness about its importance. By analysing existing methods of coping with the mentioned challenge, no harmonised solution is evident. By the increasing share of the service sector, emphasis on the HC element should be monitored more closely. The article focuses on the missing and invisible human capital elements in the framework of the value added; it offers suggestions for inclusion of the human capital factor in the process of company’s value added assessment as well as reflections on further steps in this direction.

Open access

Edmore Mahembe and Nicholas M. Odhiambo

Abstract

This paper aims to analyses the trends and dynamics of extreme poverty in developing countries. The study attempts to answer one critical question: has the world achieved its number one Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target of reducing extreme poverty by half by 2015? The methodology used in this study mainly involves a descriptive data analysis during the period 1981-2015. The study used the World Bank’s US$1.90 a day line (popularly known as $1 a day line) in 2011 prices to measure the level of absolute poverty. In order to analyze the dynamics of poverty across different regions, the study grouped countries into five regions: i) sub-Saharan Africa; ii) East Asia and the Pacific; iii) South Asia; iv) Europe and Central Asia; and v) Latin America and the Caribbean. The study found that in 1990, there were around 1.9 billion people living below US$1.90 a day (constituting 36.9 percent of the world population) and this number is estimated to have reduced to around 700 million people in 2015, with an estimated global poverty rate of 9.6 percent. The world met the MDG target in 2010, which is five years ahead of schedule. However, extreme poverty is becoming increasingly concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and South Asia (SA), where its depth and breadth remain a challenge. SSA remains the poorest region, with more than 35 percent of its citizens living on less than US$1.90 a day. Half of the world’s extremely poor people now live in SSA, and it is the only region which has not met its MDG target.

Open access

László Harnos

Abstract

The main aim of this paper is to identify the underlying reasons for the cyclical nature of the Hungarian housing market, in particular the business cycles, the construction, and market participants’ expectations. Our research was conducted based on analysis of statistical data and of the housing market indices. As a result, it can be stated that cyclic behaviour of the housing market may be explained primarily with business cycles, but state subsidies and mortgages also affect the variations. Accordingly, the increasing lending and the high amount of subsidies can generate a price bubble. The supply of second-hand dwellings looks more flexible compared with that of new ones. However, the expectations of market operators do not have a demonstrable effect on the housing market.