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Maria Ranieri, Isabella Bruni and Anne-Claire Orban de Xivry

Abstract

Media and digital literacy are being increasingly recognized as a fundamental competence for teachers of 21st century, but teachers' professional development is still far from coping with this emerging need. This paper aims at providing some recommendations for integrating media literacy into in-service teacher training programs. To this purpose, it will present the results of the experimentation carried out in three European training institutions within the framework of the European project e-MEL (e-Media Education Lab, 2014–17). The overall training process was monitored and evaluated ex-ante, ongoing and ex-post. This paper illustrates and discusses the main findings of the experimentation focusing on strengths and challenges for implementing a teacher training program on digital and media literacy. It concludes with some recommendations and more general reflections on future research directions.

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Cristiana Ottaviano

Abstract

‘Gender Ideology’ (‘GI’), as an expression, appeared at the beginning of this century within documents of the Catholic Church with the aim of delegitimising what had been produced in the field of Gender Studies. That intent was strongly clarified, being coincident with the discussion in France about the law on equal marriage, during the protests of Manif pour Tous. Likewise, in Italy, oppositions to draft laws about homophobia and civil unions generated movements unified by the denouncing of ‘GI’. This essay presents research conducted between 2014 and 2017 about online materials of some Italian associations that are positioned as ‘GI opponents’. The content analysis underlines the use of a violent communication style that aims to create alarm and panic regarding presumed ‘gender drifts’ within social and educational contexts. This operation reveals the attempt to reaffirm an anthropological vision of sexuality based on the hierarchical–complementary relationship between male and female. The analysis highlights the risk of a sort of ‘Silence Spiral’, where – in the face of a noisy and violent minority – numerous and various voices disappear. These voices differentiate and invoke the urgency of a deeper debate about the concept of gender and its implications within educational, social and ecclesiastical contexts.

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Mariela Nuñez-Janes, Aaron Thornburg and Angela Booker

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Mariela Nuñez-Janes, Aaron Thornburg and Angela Booker

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Mariela Nuñez-Janes, Aaron Thornburg and Angela Booker

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Mariela Nuñez-Janes, Aaron Thornburg and Angela Booker

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Mariela Nuñez-Janes, Aaron Thornburg and Angela Booker

Open access

Mariela Nuñez-Janes, Aaron Thornburg and Angela Booker

Open access

Mariela Nuñez-Janes, Aaron Thornburg and Angela Booker