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Book Reviews
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Employee Participation in Practice: Works Councils in the Tissue of Social Partnership in Switzerland

Abstract

The article gives an overview on the situation of firm-level employee representation in the private sector in Switzerland: Where are they frequent? Which formal status do they enjoy? What are the topics they deal with? How do they position themselves between the affiliation to the firm and the interconnection beyond the limits of the firm? We show that the strong decentralisation of industrial relations in Switzerland leads to regulations and conventions at branch and firm level with a much larger impact on the practice than legal regulations.

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Equal Outcomes, but Different Treatment – Subtle Discrimination in Email Responses From a Correspondence Test in Switzerland

Abstract

Correspondence tests on discrimination usually report only whether an applicant was invited for a job interview or not. Yet, data from a field experiment in Switzerland demonstrate that candidates with the same outcome are not necessarily treated equally. The paper complements correspondence test results with information on the time elapsed until candidates were contacted, as well as qualitative differences in invitation or rejection emails.

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Family Development and Residential Trajectories of Two Birth Cohorts Living in Switzerland: Between Individualization and Standardization

Abstract

In a context of increasing pluralization and individualization of family forms, families would often develop through (individual) spatial mobility. This challenges a dominant view of the family that emphasises spatial proximity and residential stability in a conducive environment for family development. Using data from the Swiss survey Family tiMes and multi-channel sequence analysis, this article examines the links between residential context, residential mobility and family development over the life course.

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How Factorial Survey Analysis Improves Our Understanding of Employer Preferences

Abstract

Factorial Survey Analysis (FSA) is an analytical tool that presents respondents with fictional situations (“vignettes”) to be rated or judged. In this paper we study the use of FSA in labour market sociology, with a particular focus on employer-based surveys, and what they can teach us about hiring preferences. FSA is useful in this context as it targets employers directly and comes close to a causal design. This review article seeks to pinpoint the contributions FSA has made to the field, identify its limits and propose topics in which it may be useful.

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The Logic of Couplings: A Quantitative Practice-Theoretical Perspective on Mobilities

Abstract

Motorized traffic is problematic ecologically and in the context of urban development. In the following, a perspective on mobility, traffic behaviour and individuals is presented, which links sociological practice­theoretical approaches with insights from mobility research. In addition to gaining insights into the mechanisms of persistence of automobility and its inherent dimension of inequality as well as the resulting consequences for a policy of sustainable mobility, this paper contributes to the further development of quantitative approaches in practice-theoretical research.

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Buddhist Monuments in South-Eastern India: A Study of Forms and Patronage

Abstract

The advent of Buddhism in India is usually dated back to 6th century BCE. Siddhartha Goutama, a Sakya Prince left for quest of truth and reality of life. He was showered with the divine light of enlightenment, then, instead of keeping it to himself, Gautama preferred to enlighten others. The teachings preached and propounded by Gautama Buddha were warmly accepted by a large number of people and emerged as a new school of thought i.e. Buddhism which later turned into a major religion of the world and the Buddhist remains discovered through archaeological investigations help us to reconstruct our past. (Chakrabarti, 2006: 315) It is a well known fact that various the kings of different kingdoms like Magadha, Vaisali, the Sakayas, the Bullis, the Koliyas, the Mallas, the Moriyas and Kalinga (Ancient Odisha) sought for the relics of the Buddha after the parinirvana. (Kern, 1989: 46) The emperors, kings, traders and commoners extended patronage and built monuments, kept relics, offered gifts to pay ovation to the Master Teacher. This historical phenomenon is known from various forms of Buddhist monuments built across India. Odisha, a geographical orbit of South Eastern India, is fortunate to have received a good deal of Buddhist monuments and relics. This paper is intended to present an account of different forms of Buddhist monuments that have been discovered so far, such as Stupas, Chaitys, Monasteries under the possible patronage of Buddhism in this part of India from third century BCE to sixth-seventh century CE.

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Buddhist Remains of Boudh District: A Historical Study

Abstract

The present paper focuses on the Buddhist vestiges of Boudh District of Central Odisha. Emphasis has been laid on aspects like historical background, location of sites, literary references, colonial records pertaining to Buddhist sites of the locality, local tradition, rituals and other facets of the sites. Besides, an attempt is made to locate the sites along the Buddhist trail which even continued during the British regime. Besides, detailed study of the sites with cultural remains and sporadic findings of Buddhist sculptures have been cited to draw a holistic picture of Buddhist remains in the district.

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The Doctrine of Not-self (anattā) in Early Buddhism

Abstract

Anattā or the Not-Self is a very important concept of Buddhism, which distinguishes it from other religions. there are some ways to explain this doctrine and many debates were happened between Buddhist schools and between Buddhists and the Brahmanists on this issue. Early Buddhism analyse that self is the combination of five aggregates (skandhas), and each of them is not the self. Based on this explanation, Buddhists think wrongly that anattā is ‘No-self. Deeply understand and practice of the not-self concept will help practitioners of Buddhism to be free from all sufferings. So, one needs to have a clear understanding on this concept. The purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive view of Not-self (anattā) doctrine in Early Buddhism. All its related aspects are presented in succession. This article investigates the doctrine of anattā, it is also examined with other related doctrines in Early Buddhism. By analyzing method, the meaning of Not-self (anattā) in Early Buddhism is proposed by the author. (//https:www.abebooks.de/buchsuchen/titel/anatta/)

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