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Abstract

Climate change becomes a widely acknowledged and inevitable global challenge of 21st century. For developing countries like Ethiopia, it intensifies existing challenges of ensuring sustainable development. This study examined factors affecting climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies by taking in Protection Motivation Theory. The study draws on mixed research approach in order to assess the subjective understanding about climate change threats and identify the factors determining responses to climate change. While qualitative data were collected through focus group discussions and interviews, quantitative information was collected using semi structured survey from 296 randomly selected farmers from different agro-ecologies. Qualitative data was dominantly analyzed using content analysis while descriptive and inferential statistics were applied to analyze quantitative data. Almost all respondents (97%) perceived that climate change is occurring and threatening their wellbeing. Dwindling precipitation, increasing temperature and occurrence of human and animal disease were perceived to represent climate change. From nationally initiated strategies, farmers were found to largely practice soil and water conservation and agricultural intensification, which they perceived less costly and compatible to their level of expertise. The result of binary logistic regression revealed that perceived severity of climate change, perceived susceptibility to climate change threat, perceived own ability to respond, response efficacy and cost of practices predicted farmers motivation to practice climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies. Thus, building resilient system should go beyond sensitizing climate response mechanisms. Rural development and climate change adaptation policies should focus on human capital development and economic empowerment which would enable farmers pursue context specific adaptation and mitigation strategies thereby maintain sustainable livelihood.

Abstract

This article approaches the topic of the emerging adulthood with young people in Romania, as well as the beginning of the first work experience. The main aim is to identify the factors of a successful transition from school to independent life. The article examines the social status and the issues the young people in Romania face with regard to the transition from education to employment. The data type longitudinal panel study refers to the cohort of young people born in 1994-1995, the generation which graduated from the 12th or 13th class in 2012. We answer the question „Which are the factors that determine the first work experience for Romanian young people and what does this look like?” Half of the young people have work experience - 50.1%, with 25.2% working at the time they filled in the questionnaires, two years after graduation. Employment is explained to an extent of 1% by gender and area of residence, 4% by factors of social exclusion and 1% by factors related to negative life events. All these factors explain the variance of 6% in the employment of young people. Linear regression analysis (hierarchical) showed that social inclusion factors have the greatest effect on employment, with 4% of employment variance explained by social exclusion factors, while the influence of the demographic variables, factors of social exclusion and factors related to negative life events explain 6% of the youth employment variance.

Abstract

The success of higher education graduates’ transition to the labor market is analyzed in this paper. A series of representative factors which influence the success rate on the labor market were analyzed through an exhaustive case study among graduates from West University of Timisoara. The results show a high level of satisfaction amongst graduates, despite the high level (over 40%) of total incongruence (vertical and horizontal) between the degree’s field and the actual workplace. We can also assert that the graduates’ insertion in the labor market is a real success, since most of them are able to get a job in less than 6 months from graduation (58.5%), even more do so 12 months post-graduation (83.9%).

Abstract

The paper examines the link between organizational climate and work engagement among the non-teaching staff of a Nigerian University. Participants consisted of 229 (F=46.7%; Mean age =45.7) non-teaching staff selected using stratified random sampling technique from non-teaching staff of the institution. Participants completed the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and Organizational Climate Measure that were subjected to Pearson Product Moment Correlation and t-test analysis. Results revealed that organizational climate is related to work engagement among registry staff. It also showed that female employees were more engaged with their work than their male counterparts. The paper recommends the design of appropriate strategies and interventions to ensure that employees feel more engaged in their work-roles.

Abstract

Since over a decade, there are ongoing debates about the relationships between the scientific field of consumer research and the political field of consumer policy. To date, there exist theoretical overviews of the international state of the art in consumer research and its historical developments regarding topics, and theoretical and methodological advancements. There also exist few empirical studies which approached this field through content analysis of scientific articles, case studies or literature reviews. Nonetheless, prior research has yet neglected consumer researchers themselves and, above all, their stances toward consumer policy. To fill this gap, this article seeks to enhance knowledge about consumer researchers by presenting empirical results of a survey among Austrian consumer researchers. In contrast with previous research, this article relates its empirical findings to better understand how consumer research can become a more integrated and institutionalized research area, in Austria and elsewhere. As the results indicate, there are some commonalities in Austrian consumer research which may serve as a fertile ground for a closer integration of the field and which could enhance cooperation between the scientific and the political field. Yet, as this article shows, there also exist some obstacles, which may hinder such efforts. It concludes with some propositions for consumer research as a scientific field and discusses obstacles and prospects of a future collaboration between this scientific field and consumer policy. In doing so, this article seeks to contribute to the debate about a so-called “evidence-based” consumer policy suggesting that consumer policy can draw on a wide array of scientific perspectives and should not restrict itself to behavioural insights alone, a current trend in some European countries and in the European Commission. As will be shown, the Austrian case is furthermore informative to better understand internal and external (political) efforts to foster cooperation within consumer research and the relationship between consumer research and consumer policy.

Abstract

The research field of this paper is the area of Thrace, a large geopolitical-cultural unit that was divided – due to political reasons – in three subareas distributed among three different countries: Bulgaria, Turkey and Greece. A dance event that used to take place before the border demarcation but is still performed in the Greek and Turkish Thrace is that of “K’na”, a wedding dance event danced by the people of both border areas, despite of the changes in their magical-religious beliefs and the changes brought by socio-economic and cultural development. In particular, the aim of this paper is the study of the “construction” of the national identity of inhabitants both of Greek and Turkish Thrace, as this is manifested through the dance practice within the wedding event of “K’na”, through the lens of sociocybernetics. Data was gathered through ethnographic method as this is applied to the study of dance, while its interpretation was based on sociocybernetics according to Burke’s identity control theory. From the data analysis, it is showed that the “K’na” dance in Greek and Turkish Thrace constructs and reconstructs the national identity of the people who use them as a response to the messages they receive via the communication with “the national others”. In conclusion, the “construction” of the identity results from a continuous procedure of self-regulation and self-control through a cybernetic sequence of steps.

Abstract

Even though in many cases the terms of risk and uncertainty are similar, they have to be delimited to understand the meaning of each, individual, as accurately as possible. The two terms are combined in different situations. No matter how well the risk is managed, uncertainty cannot be removed because all possible situations and interdependencies cannot be taken into account. Thus, a source of risk can be considered uncertainty in itself if it is based on poor quality information about the actual internal or external situation of the company. Also, in my conclusion, traditional financial theory distinguishes between systematic risk and particular risk, which reaches the company’s overall risk. Investors can reduce total risk with the two primary risk management instruments, namely diversification and asset allocation.

Abstract

The Niger Delta of Nigeria rich in oil and gas resources has been plagued with series of armed conflicts characterised by massive youth restiveness. The peaceful coexistence of people in the region is often affected by the nature of oil and gas business determined by the political economy of the Nigerian state. By the statute of the Federal system of Government in Nigeria, all resources within the territorial boundary of the country belong to the Federal Government. The Government then pays a certain 13% derivation fund to the resource bearing states for development. The Federal Government equally sees to the development of the region through its statutory Agencies such as the Niger Delta Development Commission. All these efforts are yet to bring about infrastructural development and human capacity needs of the region. A consequence of this is the armed militancy and cult related violence that has engulfed the region. In this paper, an attempt is made to analyse the socioeconomic requisitions of a reintegration programme for ex-offenders seeking re-entry into mainstream society. An interventionist approach is recommended with effective monitoring and evaluation system for a socioeconomic reintegration of ex-offenders in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.

Abstract

The study investigated the predictive role of pay satisfaction and organisational politics on quality of work life. Herzberg’s Two-Factor Theory was used as a theoretical framework in this study. Cross sectional survey research design was adopted. Data were collected from 429 respondents consisting of (Females = 231(53.8%), Males = 198(46.2%) (Mean age = 39.14, S.D = 12.07) via a simple random and convenience sampling techniques. Work-Related Quality of life scale (WRQLS), Pay Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) and Perceived Organisational Politics Scale (POPS) were used as instrument for data collection. Data collected were analysed using Pearson moment correlation (PPMC) and Multiple Regression analysis. There was significant positive relationship between pay satisfaction and quality of work life. Positive relationship was found between organisational politics and the quality of work life. Finally, pay satisfaction and organisational politics jointly predict quality of work life. These findings have implications for putting up psychological interventions aim at improving the quality of work life of government employees.

Abstract

The Banat area is considered an area of interculturality and multilingualism, an area where there is an interference of cultures, a continuous dialogue between cultures and spiritualties. Banat, being a multicultural and multiethnic space, is a model of harmonious coexistence between the many ethnic groups that make it up. In the present research we have aimed at identifying the individual values of the inhabitants of the studied communities and the attitudes towards the others (Romanians, Serbs, Hungarians, Germans, Bulgarians and other ethnic groups), and also their attitudes towards work, land, church, trust in state institutions and traditional occupations.