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Does the Frequency of Using Emoticons in Computer-Mediated Communication Signal Creativity?

Abstract

Nowadays many human interactions take place in the virtual environment. To express emotions and attitudes in computer-mediated communication (CMC) individuals use emoticons - graphic representations of emotions and ideas. Contemporary applications serving computer-mediated communication (CMC) are provided with a broad spectrum of emoticons which may be used in communication. Variety of emoticons gives users of CMC an opportunity to create unique messages and express emotions in a creative manner. This study involved 275 online respondents and aimed to verify whether the frequency of emoticons use may be predicted by the three characteristics of creativity (creative abilities, openness, independence). Bayesian regression analysis showed that creativity does not predict frequency of emoticons use in CMC. No correspondence between creativity and frequency of emoticons use may be explained by pragmatic function of emoticons as they are used to communicate efficiently with an emphasis on the sender-recipient shared understanding of the emoticons meaning. What is more, robust popularity of communication applications leads to widespread employment of emoticons by CMC users. Therefore, with growing number of emoticons users’ creative individuals may seek less common means of expressing own creativity.

Open access
Education and Creativity-Reflection After the Turn of the Century

Abstract

The paper deals with social and family conditions for the development of creative thinking. It is a voice in the dispute between supporters of the view that creative thinking is inherited and supporters of the thesis that it is shaped socially and within the process of education. The author presents an argument for the role of childhood and the mother in shaping creative predispositions. An attempt at polemics with concepts such as the “creative school” or the “creative teacher” is made.

Open access
A Golden Age for Creativity Research: Interview with Dean Keith Simonton

Abstract

In the interview with Dean Keith Simonton, one of most prolific creativity researchers, we discuss his career, main areas of research interest, chosen research methods and share his thoughts about the future of research on creativity and effectiveness in scientific work.

Open access
How are Creative Abilities Related to Meta-Learning Competences?

Abstract

This correlational study explored the relationship between creative abilities and selected meta-learning competences. The study was conducted among 250 first-year undergraduate and graduate students who solved the Test for Creative Thinking – Drawing Production and filled in the My Learning Questionnaire. The results demonstrate a statistically significant correlation between students’ awareness of their own learning and their creative abilities as well as a positive link between creative abilities and level of knowledge about human learning. These relationships were not moderated by the level of studies – the links among undergraduate and graduate students were similar in the case of self-awareness of learning and knowledge about learning.

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Judging Popular Novels as Creative Products: Which Creative Attributes Contribute to their Success?

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was threefold. First, to explore whether a German version of the Creative Product Semantic Scale can be applied to novels, a hitherto poorly investigated creative product. Second, to determine which of the emerging attributes might affect the potential for success of a novel. Third, to check whether the novels judged are distinguishable in terms of their creative attributes. In an online study, participants judged four popular novels from recollection: Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, The Hobbit, Twilight, and Inkheart. A factor analysis of items based on the Harry Potter subsample indicated four major dimensions: Resolution, Novelty, Style and Complexity. Among the dimensions, Resolution was the only dimension predicting potential for commercial success in a multiple regression. Novels were not distinguishable on the basis of the dimensions judged, indicating that the present CPSS did not have enough discriminatory power to detect differences among novels from the same genre. Additional measures indicated judgments had been relatively stable since the reading experience. Furthermore, a large proportion of participants was presumably biased in their memory, due to having watched the respective movie adaptation. This was suggested by a false memory check. Surprisingly however, there were no detectable differences in judgment between those who passed and those who failed the false memory check.

Open access
Processes Stimulating Dynamic Cooperation in Female Art Groups. A Qualitative Research Report

Abstract

The subject of the article is the activity of female artistic groups, with a particular focus on development and its dynamics. The aim of the research was to reconstruct the experiences and meanings that professional artists attribute to functioning in such groups. The analysis of the activities of such groups is part of the study of the environmental aspect of creativity. For the purposes of the article, qualitative research was conducted using the technique of free interviews with representatives of four artistic groups representing fine arts, cooperating in Łodz/Poland. The artists represent different generations.

Open access
Shaping Strömsö: Examining Elements in a Creative Process for the Design of New Television Content

Abstract

This paper explores elements in the creative process of the development of a new television format from both practice and research-based perspectives. We compare and integrate findings from an unpublished case study of the popular Finnish lifestyle television program, Strömsö, with the broad research literature on creativity. Through this lens, fourteen elements, which were identified through this case study to be present in the creation of Strömsö, are explored and contextualized with examples from the show’s creation. These elements were: 1) idea, 2) analyze, 3) brainstorm, 4) research, 5) benchmark, 6) toss ideas, 7) temporary input, 8) inspiration from an unexpected source, 9) rest, 10) formulate, 11) concretize, 12) pilot, 13) make mistakes, and 14) chaos. Research on multiple subtopics related to creativity is utilized to illustrate how knowledge gained through the academic literature can be integrated with these findings to provide possible guidance for practice. In doing so, we show how diverse epistemological and methodological approaches to examining the same phenomena can bolster insight and understanding for researchers and practitioners alike. Researchers will be able to note how topics that they are familiar with manifested in a practical setting, and non-academic professionals involved in creating content for television and new media will be introduced to theory and research that may aid in their creative endeavors. We intend this manuscript to provide useful information to such professionals and inspire additional research in the academic community.

Open access
Utilizing the Consensual Assessment Technique to Compare Creativity in Drama Spaces

Abstract

Objective: This study examines the validity of Amabile’s (1982) consensual assessment technique in measuring creativity in a warm-up activity in fourth-grade drama classrooms and compares the scores between warm-ups occurring in a blackbox theater setting (experimental) vs. a traditional classroom (control). Method: Four professional actors viewed 60 clips of children’s drama warm-ups and scored for creativity, using a 5-point scale. After establishing sufficient inter-rater reliability (IRR), we used the average scores of the raters to compare creativity between the experimental and control groups. Results: The raters demonstrated high agreement, with a coefficient alpha estimate of .819. An independent samples t-test between the experimental and control groups was significant at p < .001, with the experimental group receiving higher scores. Conclusions: The results suggested that creativity was significantly higher in the experimental group, and the context correlated with creativity, despite neither group having yet received drama instruction at that time. This paper presents discussions about validity, opinions of the raters, possible implications for the activity itself, and possible effect of setting on creativity.

Open access
Women’s Everyday Creative Activities: a Qualitative Study

Abstract

The objective is to analyze manifestations of everyday creativity from the perspective of a group of women. We are interested in recovering the voices of the participants to understand constructed meanings regarding the actions, emotions, relations and contexts to unfolding processes of everyday creativity. We conducted a qualitative study, in which 20 Argentine women aged between 21 and 69 years participated. The sampling was not probabilistic, intentional and for convenience. The participants reside in cities of intermediate size, namely Córdoba, San Luis and Mendoza (Argentina). They reported daily, during one week, on the creative activities in which they were engaged in their lives. The process of data collection was done through WhatsApp; participants sent texts, audios, videos and photographs. We codified and analyzed the data with the QDA MINER LITE program. We constructed four categories of analysis: doing creative things; others and creative contexts; emotions in play and creative self-belief. The results indicate that people relate creativity to different types of work (cooking, handicrafts, academic activities, artistic workshops, solving daily problems, etc.). Others play an important role in creativity as the recipients of creative work, collaborative co-workers or helpers that facilitate creative tasks. The development of everyday creative activities is also linked to well-being and positive emotions (pleasure, passion, desire, satisfaction, self-realization and personal expression). We highlight the importance of creative identity as a complex construction of expectations, self-evaluations and metacognitive processes. The research contributes to the understanding of everyday creativity as a factor that promotes health and the empowerment of women.

Open access