Browse

1 - 10 of 186 items :

  • Dermatological and Veneral Diseases x
Clear All
Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnant Women at Maternal and Child Hospital, West Java, Indonesia, 2018: High Prevalence in Asymptomatic Females

Abstract

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a lower genital tract infection of reproductive women which can occur in pregnant and non-pregnant women. BV in pregnant women can increase the risk of complications, including increased incidence of abortion, premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, and babies with low birth weight. BV can also increase the risk of acquired sexually transmitted infection (STI) and their further transmission, including human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV). Each country has a different prevalence of BV. The previous report of BV prevalence in pregnant women was submitted in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1990. Until now, there is no update data of BV in pregnant women, especially in West Java, Indonesia. Thus, we conducted a descriptive observational study using a cross-sectional design and a consecutive sampling method in June 2018. This study included 60 pregnant women in the Maternal and Child Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia. Out of 60 participants, seven (11.67%) participants had BV according to Amsel criteria. Asymptomatic BV was diagnosed in all participants. This study shows the prevalence of BV in pregnant women in the Maternal and Child Hospital in Bandung during June 2018. The assessment of screening BV should be recommended as a routine workup. To avoid complications in pregnant women and infants it should not be waited for the symptoms to reveal.

Open access
Recurrent Vulvar Melanoma – a Case Report

Abstract

Melanoma rarely develops in the genital area. It is responsible for 5% of all vulvar malignancies. Postmenopausal women are usually more affected and the main differential diagnosis is vulvar melanosis and vulvar nevi. There are limited numbers of studies on dermoscopic features of mucosal melanoma, particularly early-stage lesions. Dermoscopic criteria have been described for the diagnosis of vulvar melanosis, and observational studies have been conducted to define the dermoscopic features of nevi and melanoma on the vulva. We are presenting the case of a 69-year old female with suspected recurrence of vulvar melanoma who previously had surgical removal of mucosal lentiginous melanoma on the left labia minor in June 2017. Five months after the primary melanoma surgery, the patient noticed de novo pigmentation at the left and right labia minor and urethral opening. On clinical examination, irregular light-brown pigmentation with ill-defined borders was evident on the labia minora of the vulva and around the external urethral orifice. On dermoscopy, irregular pigmented network, with white scar-like and structureless pinkish areas was evident. Incisional biopsy of the vulvar mucosa revealed melanoma in situ, confirming the local recurrence. CT scans of the head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis and gynaecological examination revealed no secondary deposits. Ultrasound of the regional inguinal lymph nodes revealed enlarged suspected pathologic involvement of the lymph nodes in both inguinal regions. Lymph node fine needle aspiration of lymph nodes in the left and right inguinal area revealed pleomorphic infiltrate of lymphoid cells with hemosiderin or melanoma pigment in the cytoplasm. Cystoscopic findings were within normal range. Interdisciplinary tumour board indicated wide excision of melanoma with margins of 1 cm and resection of the urethra, as well as biopsy of the enlarged left inguinal lymph node. Histopathological analysis of the resected mucosa revealed lentiginous spread of melanocytes showing moderate atypia, with focal pagetoid spread, without mitoses and ulceration and without invasion of lamina propria. The resection margins were tumour-free. Non-specific lymphadenitis was diagnosed on lymph node histopathological analysis. The patient was regularly monitored by a dermatologist and urologist, and had no recurrence. The accurate and prompt diagnosis is essential in the case of the vulvar melanoma which has unfavourable and unpredictable prognosis, with a tendency of local recurrences and regional and distant metastases in the case of invasive melanoma. In order not to miss early mucosal melanoma, dermatologists and gynaecologists should not avoid biopsy of lesions that demonstrate any clinical or dermoscopic feature of atypical melanocytic lesion, especially in case of the development of irregular pigmentation that expands and changes over time, the appearance of a solitary amelanotic papule or nodule requires excision or, in case of large diameter lesions, incision biopsies. Larger studies are needed to define more rigorously clinical and dermoscopic criteria that accurately distinguish early mucosal melanomas from benign skin lesions.

Open access
Sero-epidemiology and risk factors of syphilis in Makassar, Indonesia

Abstract

Introduction. Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum spirochete and is mainly transmitted by sexual contact. Syphilis has the potential to cause serious complications and is closely related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection thus making syphilis still a major public health problem. In Indonesia, surveys of high-risk populations in 2007 and 2011 reported an increase in the prevalence of syphilis, especially in men who have sexual relationships with other men (MSM). Moreover, studies have described risk factors for HIV transmission including MSM, heterosexual contacts, Intravenous (IV) drug use, and infected partners.

Objectives. To assess the epidemiological aspects and risk factors for syphilis in Makassar, as well as the correlation with a coinfection of other sexually transmitted infections.

Material and Methods. This study is a multi-centre cross-sectional descriptive study with consecutive sampling. We evaluated cases for eligibility by confirming the diagnosis based on the serological result using rapid plasma reagin assay (RPR), Treponema pallidum haemagglutination (TPHA), and HIV screening kit. The cases were analyzed based on epidemiological features, risk factors and clinical findings, co-infection with other sexually transmitted infection (ST), and stadium of the disease.

Results. A total of 79 serologically confirmed syphilis cases were collected between January 2017 and December 2018 in Makassar, the capital city of South Sulawesi province in Indonesia. Of the 63 male subjects (79.7%), 38 (48.1%) were homosexual/MSM, and in 41 cases of HIV-infected subjects, 25 (60.9%) of them were also MSM.

Conclusion. Our study showed there was a significant correlation between syphilis and an increased risk of HIV transmission in MSM groups. The higher number of cases of syphilis and HIV co-infection among MSM can increase transmission of both infections and should be considered a major risk factor for syphilis in Makassar.

Open access
Successful Management of Treatment-Resistant Alopecia Areata with Platelet Rich Plasma: A Case Series

Abstract

Introduction. Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune disease-causing non-scarring alopecia. It is usually treated with immunosuppressive agents, to which some patients fail to respond adequately.

Material and Methods. Three patients with AA refractory to standard therapy were treated with intra-dermal injection of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) every four weeks.

Results. All three patients showed remarkable improvement after multiple sessions of PRP treatment.

Conclusion. Autologous PRP is safe and effective in treatment-resistant forms of AA demonstrated in many case reports; therefore it deserves further study with randomized, placebo-controlled trials.

Open access
Unilateral Mediothoracic Exanthem: Case Reports of two Indian Female Children

Abstract

Unilateral mediothoracic exanthem is a variant of a common entity in Western literature, namely Asymmetric Periflexural Exanthem of Childhood (APEC). Less than ten cases of unilateral mediothoracic exanthem have been described worldwide, and only two are reported in Indian literature. Herein, we report two childhood cases of uni-lateral mediothoracic exanthem from India. Dermatologists must be aware of this self-limiting condition, in order to avoid invasive and exhaustive investigations and misdiagnosis.

Open access
Clinical, Dermatoscopical and Laboratory Essentials of Fish Tank Granuloma

Abstract

In immunocompetent individuals Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum) infection usually presents with localized skin lesions, better known as “swimming pool granuloma” or “fish tank granuloma” (FTG). When establishing the diagnosis of FTG, doctors encounter several problems in the clinical practice: granulomas are detected in less than two thirds of biopsies and acid-fast bacilli are identified only in a minority of cases. Majority of disseminated and aggressive FTG forms are unrecognized at the beginning, and occur in immunosuppressed patients, including organ transplant patients. Functional impairment or even amputation of the extremity, visceral involvement and lethal outcome have been reported. Although more than one thousand cases of FTG have been reported worldwide, dermatoscopy of FTG, as a diagnostic aid, has not been reported yet. Presenting the case of FTG of recent onset where, guided by dermatoscopy, microorganisms were isolated and identified from the biopsy material, we summarize the essentials of clinical and laboratory diagnostics of M. marinum infection.

Open access
Epidemiologic and Clinical Differences Between Classic and Hypertrophic Lichen Planus in Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction. Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory skin disease known to have several clinical variants with attended variable clinical outcomes. Certain complications have been observed in the hypertrophic type, which were not found in association with the classic variant.

Objective: To identify the epidemiologic and clinical differences between the classic and hypertrophic lichen planus and clinical correlates.

Material and Methods. Of 104 participants with lichen planus included in the study, 49 had classic and 55 hypertrophic lichen planus. Demographic and clinical information was obtained. Diagnosis of lichen planus was made clinically and confirmed with histology. The participants were screened for metabolic syndrome, hepatitis B, and C.

Results: Mean age of all patients was 37.20±13.39 years, with no age and gender differences between the participants with classic and hypertrophic lichen planus. Classic lichen planus was more likely to be painful, (8.2% vs 0.0, p=0.046), generalized (95.9% vs 16.4%, p<0.001), involve the oral mucosa (38.8% vs 0.0, p<0.001), the nails (38.8% vs 1.8, p<0.001), present with kobnerisation (55.1% vs 5.5%,<0.001), Wickhiam striae (69.4% vs 16.4%, p<0.001), associated with Hepatitis B vaccination (16.3% vs 3.6%, p<0.028) and anti HCV positivity (16.3% vs 0.0%, p=0.002). Hypertrophic lichen planus was significantly associated with impaired glucose tolerance/diabetes mellitus (16.4% vs 2.0%, p=0.013), dyslipidemia (74.5% vs 40.8%, p=0.001) and saw-tooth histologic appearance compared to classic type.

Conclusion: Hypertrophic lichen planus is more likely to be associated with metabolic complications compared to the classic type. Further studies are needed to loink this difference t chronic inflamation.

Open access
Familial Hypercholesterolemia with Tendinous Xanthomas and Achilles Tendinitis – A Forgotten Dermato-Rheumatologic Association

Abstract

Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a disorder of lipoprotein metabolism with dermatological and rhematological manifestations. Tendinous xanthomata (TX) are a hallmark of this disease. They are associated with recurrent tendinitis and tendon damage, an aspect of the clinical presentation, which is not well-known among dermatologists. We report two cases of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, where the patients started developing tendinous xanthomata early in their life, with progressive increase in the number and size of lesions. However, they presented late, only when the recurrent attacks of tendinitis became severe. We present these cases to highlight the rheumatologic features, which may be the first symptom of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia.

Open access
Superficial Genital Infantile Hemangiomas

Abstract

Introduction. Superficial infantile hemangiomas (IH) are rarely localized in the genital region.

Case Report. We present 8 infants with IHs in the genital region (3 boys and 5 girls). Our patients had only superficial IHs, their internal organs were not affected and there were no associated anomalies. In the boys, IHs were localized on the scrotum and the foreskin in 2 cases and 1 case, respectively. In the girls, IHs were on the labia majora and near the vaginal introitus. None of the IHs showed any IH-related complications. No therapy for IHs was administered in any of the presented infants, either because IHs were small and non-aggressive, or because their parents rejected the proposed therapy.

Conclusion. Genital IHs have increased tendency for ulceration, so thorough examination and follow-up are of outmost importance. If therapy is indicated, oral propranolol is the treatment of choice for genital IHs.

Open access
Use of Ustekinumab in the Treatment of Libyan Psoriasis Vulgaris Patients

Abstract

Introduction. Psoriasis is a relatively common chronic inflammatory disease. It clinically manifests as raised, well defined erythematous plaques with irregular borders and silvery scales. Psoriasis appears to be mediated by abnormal immune system functioning, including T lymphocyte and macrophage activation and release of various cytokins, such as interleukin 12 (IL-12) and IL-23. Recently a new biologic agent Ustekinumab has been used in the treatment of psoriasis. Our aim in this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of ustekinumab in moderate to severe psoriasis vulgaris and to observe and report any adverse reaction.

Material and Methods. Thirty five psoriatic patients above the age of 18 years having moderate to severe psoriasis were included in this study. Ustekinumab is available in pre-filled syringe 45mg/0.5ml, 90mg/1.0ml for subcutaneous injection according to body weight at the intervals of 0, 4 weeks, and then every 12 weeks. It is given in hospital by a doctor or specialist nurse. The assessment of the patients’ condition and improvement was carried out after administering each dose using PASI score.

Results. Thirty five patients were included in this study. Baseline PASI score of our patients ranged from 11.4 to 39.8 (mean: 21.1).There was a dramatic response to treatment with ustekinumab in which PASI decreased to 6.7 after the second dose, followed by subsequent responses that reached 2.6 after the 6th dose. After the second dose, 61% of the cases had marked improvement and 11% had clearance of their skin lesions. After the last, sixth dose there was a marked improvement in 65% of cases and the percentage of complete clearance increased to 24%. Ustekinumab had positive effect on psoriatic nail changes as well-there was a significant improvement in 50% of cases and complete clearance (cure) in 24% of cases.

Conclusion: Ustekinumab is effective in the treatment of severe and resistant cases of psoriasis vulgaris. It is well tolerated by the patients. No reactions or serious side effects have been reported.

Open access