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Abstract

Poland's Village Fund (Fundusz Sołecki) is an instrument operating at the level of the so-called sołectwo, into which local-administration units known as gminas may be further sub-divided. These are therefore auxiliary administrative units in rural areas whose receipt of means from the Fund in question allows for the activation of local communities. Against that background, the research detailed here sought to examine Village Fund by reference to the greenspace-related projects pursued using it in the rural gminas of Łódzkie Voivodeship. Additional aspects are the classification of the tasks carried out, presentation of the statistical analysis applied, and consideration of the breakdown obtained for indicators relating to the share of funds allocated to green areas – by reference to the properties of the normal distribution curve.

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Abstract

This paper investigates trends in Swiss women’s and men’s gender attitudes in the period 2000–2017 using the Swiss Household Panel data. Based on pooled OLS and fixed-effects models, we establish the following for women and men: (1) over this time period, attitudes towards gender roles become more egalitarian, while attitudes towards gender equality achievement remain stable; (2) the youngest cohort unexpectedly holds more traditional attitudes; and (3) individual attitudes change over the life course based on life events and the attitudes of one’s partner.

Abstract

Relying on the data of the Swiss Household Panel, the paper aims to make sense of the puzzling dissatisfaction union members exhibit in most dimensions of their job. A longitudinal approach reveals that the dissatisfaction is to a large extent explained by contextual and individual time-invariant unobserved heterogeneity. A decline in job satisfaction is for many workers the main reason to join a union. Job satisfaction climbs back as the years of membership increase, which confirms that unions do indeed have positive effects on the professional well-being of their members.

Abstract

Based on longitudinal analyses of data from the Swiss Household Panel, this paper investigates the effect of different types of debt on two evaluative measures of subjective well-being: financial satisfaction and life satisfaction. Payment arrears reduce financial satisfaction more than loans or the accumulation of different types of debt (arrears and loans). This negative effect is stable over time. Conversely, each additional year with arrears decreases life satisfaction, confirming the overall and general negative effect of arrears on all domains of daily life, especially for the elderly.

Abstract

Relying on the 2013 and 2016 rounds of individual questionnaires from the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), we use multiple correspondence analysis to map Swiss media consumption practices while making use of the longitudinal character of panel data in an innovative way. Our results show that individual practices can be distinguished along two main dimensions: on the one hand, the reliance on new media, which is explained mainly by the age cohort, and on the other hand, the consumption of news, which is explained mainly by changes in political interest as well as by gender.

Abstract

Subjective well-being (SWB) has been positively correlated with political activity, however the causality of the effect remains debated. By estimating within-individual effects, I show that SWB decreases protest intentions, while its effect on voting is not significant. Despite the mutual influence between SWB and protest, the results suggest that the influence of SWB on protesting is stronger than the reverse effect, thereby setting an agenda for future research in this domain.

Abstract

This study draws on the Swiss Household Panel and employs specific panel data methods to investigate whether work-life conflict – decomposed into time-, and strain-based conflicts – and lack of recovery during off-job time (i. e. psychological detachment from work) cause insomnia. The findings indicate that, when adequately accounting for individual hetero geneity and the relative importance of multiple causal factors, recovery and recuperation processes appear crucial to the experience of insomnia, while the significance of perceived work-life conflict recede, for both men and women.