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Abstract

AirBnB has become a preferred accommodation marketplace for the travellers around the world. AirBnB is a two-sided digital platform that connects guests and hosts. In so doing, it creates value for both sides of the platform. Guests save money on the accommodation and hosts get earnings from their otherwise idle space. The case follows the company from the inception to its growth and current challenges with wider community. The case helps to understand the key features of digital platforms: how do they create value for all users; how do they shape value propositions for two sides, and how does the community become a stakeholder in the platform business. It also focuses on the issue of trust and the need for the company to integrate the concerns of other stakeholders such as communities and local authorities. Finally, the case highlights the impact of Covid-19 on the company and the travel industry.

Abstract

The increase in the number of immigrants in Europe in recent decades has been accompanied by a rise in anti-immigrant sentiment and a growth in support for far-right political parties in Europe. A key element for ant-immigrant sentiment is the assumed lack of attachment and commitment of immigrants to the institutions, values and national identity of the host country. While a considerable body of studies have focused on the political and social assimilation of immigrants into European countries, the possible influence of Irish labour market experiences of first and second generation immigrants from non-western countries and Eastern European countries remains an under-researched area in th e literature. Combining five waves of the European Social Survey we test the proposition that the labour market experiences of first and second-generation immigrants from non-western countries and Eastern European countries are a factor affecting the extent of political and social assimilation into the host country. Our findings indicate that first-generation immigrants’ attachment to the political institutions of the host country are likely influenced more by a comparison with conditions in their country of origin rather than how they fare in labour market of the host country.

Abstract

Research has documented racial or ethnic discrimination in online marketplaces, from labor markets to credit applications to housing. Platforms should therefore investigate how platform design decisions and algorithms can influence the extent of discrimination in a marketplace. By increasing awareness of this issue, managers can proactively address the problem. In many cases, a simple but effective change a platform can make is to withhold potentially sensitive user information, such as race and gender, until after a transaction has been agreed to. Further, platforms can use principles from choice architecture to reduce discrimination. For example, people have a tendency to use whatever option is set as the default. If Airbnb switched, for instance, ist default to instant book, requiring hosts to actively opt out of it, the company could reduce the scope for discrimination. It is important that discrimination and possible solutions are discussed transparently.

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Abstract

For many travelers, the problem is familiar: You check out from Airbnb and your flight is not till later. So you have time to still enjoy a city, but you’re stuck with your luggage, which stops you from really taking advantage of it. At this point, Stasher comes in. Stasher is the world's first international luggage storage network. Customers in many cities, mainly in the UK and Europe but also in North America, can now easily and inexpensively book short-term storage for their luggage 24/7 on the platform via the app. What’s more, they can do this locally, and not only near a train station or airport, with the chance for a nice chat plus insider advice on the area.

Abstract

Helpful reviews are like good movies or a good novel: if you’re hooked right away, you stay and remember. No matter how short, a review tells a story in much the same way as a novel. If you want to persuade, it should start with something dramatic and sensational or the key takeaway, rather than saving the best elements for the end. Narrative elements can change the way reviews influence people, and media literacy can go a long way. Social media influencers and professional reviewers should now also know that they are better off investing in creative writing or storytelling courses than choosing to analyze experiences factually. Further, software developers should learn to distinguish useful reviews from less helpful or relevant ones. With such skills, they can structure platforms in ways that make writing transporting, helpful, persuasive reviews as easy as possible and can develop algorithms that favor real and useful reviews.

Abstract

Today, virtually all e-commerce and sharing-economy platforms rely on star ratings or similar systems to build trust between anonymous buyers and sellers. However, star ratings can be quite tricky as a navigation aid. Platforms and users face several challenges in making sure that reputation systems remain credible. Skewed ratings and low rating variance, however, make it difficult for users to differentiate good from bad products and services. To tackle the issue of retaliation, most platforms use so-called simultaneous review schemes, only publishing ratings once both parties have committed. Furthermore, platforms may offer individuals the opportunity to leave text reviews as a complement to numeric ratings. A growing number of platforms also use complex technical systems and algorithms to automatically identify, mark or delete fake news. To maintain legitimacy, platform operators need to design reputation systems with minimal negative side effects and make crucial decisions about the level of control they seek to enact.

Abstract

Hunting for “stars”, the icons of the reputation economy, is a prerequisite for survival in e-commerce in general and on sharing platforms in particular. The key to understanding the rise of reputation is trust, and the ability of a platform to provide this trust has become crucial in the past decade. Social media managers are now key players in marketing departments. One of their most important jobs is the careful curation of digital reputations. Marketers need to engage in diverse forms of reputation management and master several challenges in designing the right systems and utilizing reputation information in optimal ways. Engendering trust is more complex than gaining star ratings or positive reviews on owned or third-party platforms. How platforms are designed – in terms of how people can make bookings or orders and how users rate each other – is the key issue. It needs to be managed in a sophisticated way, especially in an era when topics such as racial and ethnic justice are key societal concerns.

Abstract

In the old economy, reputation was considered an important but somewhat underestimated intangible asset. In the digital economy, the significance of reputation is expanded in scope. It enables the building of trust among “quasi-strangers” who engage in an economic transaction. Reputation scores, usually in the form of feedback, ranking and rating systems, facilitate the building of trust in the absence of a direct relationship between sellers and buyers. Concomitantly with the rise of social network sites and the proliferation of metrics and analytics of all kinds, the era of the “reputation economy” has dawned. A good reputation usually brings further good evaluations. On the other hand, a bad reputation can be a long-term setback for a company. Having no reputation means virtual non-existence in the eyes of today’s consumers. Professional reputation management is therefore a core task that makes a decisive contribution to the success of a company.