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Abstract

Much has been written about dreaming, but deep, dreamless sleep still seems to receive little attention within cultural studies and social science. This article analyses Georges Perec's A Man Who Sleeps and Ottessa Moshfegh's My Year of Rest and Relaxation in terms of the phantasm of metamorphosis enabled by sleep. These two novels show that the polarity of waking and dreaming can be relativized and shifted to the polarity between waking-dreaming/sleeping: This shift becomes particularly productive when it comes to the question of losing and finding ones identity, but also when we try to shed light on the relationship between (ideological or biographical) subjectification and self-overcoming. At the centre of this article is the notion of the sovereignty of sleep, which could allow both day life and dream life to be lifted out of joint.

Abstract

This is a plea to interlink Resistance Studies and Violence Studies. Instead of invastigating the efficiency of violence alone and declaring violence absolutely and completely in and on its own, it is necessary to look at resistance practices (escape lines, fighting back), body politics and passivations (self-injury, abortion, suicide) at the same time. For their part, resistance practices and passivations can not be measured by success but by the fact that they actually happened. People cannot be completely reduced to bare bodies without resistance. Resistance to violence has to be considered in its inconspicuous, low-threshold and „flat“ forms. In this elementary political sense resistance is understood as a punctually weakening violence and as seperation of powers in statu nascendi.

Abstract

Wie werden Nahrungskulturen tradiert? Welche Rolle spielen (fiktive) Narrative für den Transfer der Nahrungskulturen im Bereich des Kulturerbes und des kulinarischen Tourismus? Wie und zu welchem Zweck erfolgt in den Narrativen die Hinwendung zum Körper, zu den Sekundärsinnen und zum Geschmack im Besonderen? Wie trägt diese Hinwendung zur Inszenierung der Authentizität der Nahrungskulturen und zur Inwertsetzung des kulinarischen und nichtkulinarischen Erbes bei? Und welche Bedeutung wird bei all dem den sinnes- und medienästhetischen Praktiken beigemessen? Der Beitrag demonstriert, dass (fiktive) Narrative wie ihre (multi-)mediale Umsetzung ein eigenständiges, bedeutungsgenerierendes Format für die Produktion des Kulturerbes darstellen. Im Sinne eines Differenzmerkmals verleihen Narrative den (Kulturerbe-)Produkten Exklusivität und erhöhen ihren Wert. Je authentischer die Narrative wirken – insbesondere durch ihre Kopplung an den Körper, sinnesästhetische und multisensorische, mediale Praktiken –, desto größer ist das Anreicherungspotenzial der Produkte.

Abstract

This article explores the contemporary practice of forced detainment and expulsion in Switzerland from two distinct perspectives: the 1995 law on coercive measures that first introduced the practice in Switzerland, as well as the cultural context that led to its constitution, and the documentary Le vol spécial by Fernand Melgar, made some fifteen years after the law was first introduced, which records the law’s consequences for the daily lives of rejected asylum seekers awaiting expulsion. Using Giorgio Agamben’s theoretical work on the states of exception and bare life, I seek to uncover what I call the narrative of expulsion, arguing that narrative politics operates on a number of interrelated levels not only to shape the context and practice of forced expulsion that undergird the asylum politics in Switzerland, and other countries, today, but ultimately also to change the post-enlightenment narrative of the political subject and challenge the efficacy of the Human Rights regime the world over.