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Activities, political thought and martyrdom of Janos Esterhazy (1901-1957)

Abstract

This research focuses on the life of Cardinal Alfonso Visconti reconstructing the years of his religious formation until his arrival in Rome: from the activity carried out at the Congregation of the Oratory founded by San Filippo Neri, to the diplomatic career conducted in the service of the Holy See. After serving in Portugal and Prague, at the court of Rudolf II, between 1595 and 1598 he was sent on a diplomatic mission, as nuncio, to the Prince of Transylvania Zsigmond Báthory. His mission took place in a dramatic historical phase for Danubian-Balkan Europe, threatened by the power of the Turkish “infidel”.

The article aims to reconstruct the main phases of Visconti’s difficult mission, which had been sent to this peripheral part of the continent, but very important on a geopolitical level, with the aim of creating the anti-Turkish crusade so much desired by Pope Clement VIII

Abstract

In his article “Changing the Rhythm of Design Capitalism and the Total Aestheticization of the World” Márton Szentpéteri intends to highlight the most important stages of the accelerating total aestheticization of the world resulting at the contemporary period of neoliberal design culture. In the age of design capitalism, the hegemony of consumption culture is being constantly maintained by a culture industry substantially expressed by and embodied in design. The paper claims that the eminent reason of the crisis of democracy today is rooted in the global society of the designed spectacle with its one-dimensional citizens loosing almost all abilities to recognize and consequently defend their rights and to decrease their alienation from real needs, responsibilities and sensibilities. Democracy is fading due to neoliberal globalization – especially in the case of the commercialization of the public sector. However, the particular role of design in this process has hitherto been neglected or underestimated. Against the trend of fading democracy, different sorts of design activism experimenting with disobedient objects and strategies of critical design point towards a much-awaited rebirth of art in terms of its compensatory power against damages of our lifeworld generated by the modernization process with globalisation in the lead. These endeavours are in harmony with the return of art in terms of emergency aesthetics. This rebirth can also be reinforced by the defence of the values of liberal learning being so much threatened amid a global higher education crisis, and especially by understanding design education in the frameworks of liberal learning rather than vocational training.

Abstract

The present study approaches the subject of the diplomatic relation between Italy and the Soviet Union during 1944 and 1945 beginning with 27th May 1944 when Pietro Quaroni, a career diplomat, presented the credentials of ambassador.

Abstract

In his article “A Distant View of Close Reading: On Irony and Terrorism around 1977,” György Fogarasi investigates the contemporary critical potentials of close reading in the light of recent developments in computation assisted analysis. While rhetorical reading has come to appear outdated in a “digital” era equipped with widgets for massive archival analysis (an era, namely, more keen on “distant,” rather than “close,” reading), Paul de Man’s insights concerning irony might prove useful in trying to account for the difficulties we must face in a world increasingly permeated with dissimulative forms of threat and violence. The article draws on three major texts from 1977: de Man’s draft on “Literature Z,” his lecture on “The Concept of Irony,” and the first and second Geneva Protocols. The reading of these texts purports to demonstrate the relevance of de Man’s theory of irony with respect to the epistemology of “terrorism,” but it also serves as an occasion to reflect upon questions of distance, speed, range, scale, or frequency, and the chances of “rhythmanalysis.”

Abstract

In his article “Drums of Doubt: On the Rhythmical Origins of Poetic and Scientific Exploration” Caius Dobrescu argues that even though the sciences and arts of doubt have never been connected to the notion of rhythm, doubt is a form of energy, and more specifically, a form of vibration. It implies an exploratory movement that constantly expands and recoils in a space essentially experienced as uncharted territory. Poetry acquires cognitive attributes through oscillatory rhythmic patterns that are explorative and adaptive. In order to test this hypothesis, the essay focuses on the nature and functioning of free verse. This modern prosodic mutation brings about a dovetailing of the rhythmic spectrum, but also, and more significantly, a change in the very manner of understanding and experiencing rhythm. Oscillatory rhythms are broadly associable with entrainment indexes that point to the adaptation of inner physiological and behavioral rhythms to oscillatory environment stimuli. Free verse emerges from the experience of regaining an original explorative, adaptive, and orientation-oriented condition of consciousness.

Abstract

The Greek-Catholic and Orthodox Deaneries of Târgu Mureş were part of the ceded territory through The Vienna Arbitration. The economic issues that the two deaneries faced during World War II were complex and varied. The first one was related to the seizure of the majority of the harvest collected on the church territory in the autumn of 1940. The living of the clergy and their families was affected also by the payment delayed until February 1941. Beside all of these, the economical stability was affected, for a longer period of time, by the loss of their lands, which constituted a source for additional revenues, especially for the poorer parishes. Some of the investments in building new churches were in vain. Two churches were demolished by unknown authors during 1941. The economic problems, that the two deaneries faced, have returned to the previous situation after the liberation of the Northern Transylvania.

Abstract

In his article “Embracing Noise and Error”, Bálint L. Bálint argues that human society is going through a profound change as mathematical models are used to predict human behavior both on a personal level and on the level of the entire society. An inherent component of mathematical models is the concept of error or noise, which describes the level of unpredictability of a system by the specific mathematical model. The author reveals the educational origin of the abstract world that can be described by pure mathematics and can be considered an ideal world without errors. While the human perception of the world is different from the abstractions we were taught, the mathematical models need to integrate the error factor to deal with the unpredictability of reality. While scientific thinking developed the statistic-probabilistic model to define the limits of predictability, here we present that in a flow of time driven by entropy, stochastic variability is an in-built characteristic of the material world and represents ultimately the singularity of each individual moment in time and the chance for our freedom of choice.