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Abstract

Nowadays, in many Italian and European universities, teachers’ training includes one or more examinations related to new didactic methodologies and practices. The topic of this paper is how it is possible to realize a new video analysis laboratory as a didactic and research “tool” for teachers’ training at the University of Salerno that can support teaching–learning process for new teachers. The main idea of this project is to design and implement a mobile video analysis laboratory for video recording real or simulated didactic activities. In addition, the concept that drives this research is to develop a “plug-and-play” laboratory that can be installed everywhere in less than 15 minutes by everybody. This laboratory is already designed and tested and is composed of five cameras, a control room software and an open source video analysis software.

Abstract

The study discusses the ability to develop metacognitive skills through experiences of contact with cinematic works that produce complex, multifaceted, emotional impacts understood by the body before they are understood by the mind. We investigate the relationship between music and images by identifying morphological profiles and the multimodal value of hybridized, dynamic and mutually changing phenomena [Zambaldi, 2016] in which we see ourselves [Gallese, Guerra, 2015]. We must emphasize that only by elaborating propositions, reordering reality according to grammatical codes and syntactic patterns, it is possible to circumscribe and amplify the power of communication and non-verbal relationships: the power of embodied cognition must not stop but foster the power of words

Abstract

In this work, a Storytelling FabLab has been designed for the realization of virtual performances on a Shakesperian play in an elementary school. In this FabLab, many elements have been digitally manipulated: text, audio files, virtual actors on a 3D stage, and 3D Greek masks. Learning of contents and motivation have been assessed and compared to those of a traditional class working on the construction of real masks as artefacts. Regarding learning effectiveness, data show that there is no great difference between the score gained by the experimental group and the control one; however, results emphasize a high intrinsic motivation for both experimental and control groups. Moreover, qualitative results of both groups highlight the positive feeling of doing things reflecting user’s own interest: pupils want to invent their own stories and realize them (physically or digitally).

Abstract

This paper is about “Improvement of teaching techniques by eye tracking in technology enhanced classrooms” (e-Teach), an innovative project funded by the Erasmus Plus Programme (KA2 - Strategic Partnership in the field of School Education). The project aims to study teachers’ eye movements in real teaching situation using eye-tracking glasses and compares the teachers’ use of digital technologies between novices and experts teaching the same school subject. The purpose of this study was to provide indicators of skill gaps between novices and experts which can be addressed appropriately with highly targeted teacher education. The first part of the paper reviews recent developments in conceptual frameworks for digital competence and in digital competence descriptors. The second part describes the project status, the methods and its phases. In conclusion, the paper gives a brief overview of initial findings of ongoing research, focusing largely on the Italian experience, and development tasks for the next project phases. The initial findings suggest that teachers valued the benefits of using digital technologies in classrooms and recognized the necessity of professional development. They also provided specific insights for the purpose of developing an online course for teacher education in four languages: English, Turkish, Italian and Lithuanian.

Abstract

Although scholars emphasised the essence of feedback delivered on virtual reality-based tasks, it remains unclear whether the acquisition of students’ oral presentation skills can be enhanced by the timing of feedback. An exploratory study, recently conducted in a Dutch university, explores the potential differential impact of immediate versus delayed feedback within a virtual reality-based task, in which students present to a virtual audience and receive feedback generated by the computer on presentation behaviour. By making use of an experimental study design, the potential effects of immediate feedback are compared with a control condition of a virtual reality-based presentation task with delayed feedback directly provided after the presentation. Performance assessments, including validated rubrics for oral presentation skills, were used for data collection. The results demonstrated no differences between the impact of immediate and delayed feedback on students’ presentation performance. However, significant differences in performance were traceable for students from differing study domains. As such, students following a technical study showed lower presentation scores in comparison to students from non-technical higher education curricula. More studies are needed to investigate comprehensive learning environments on students’ presentation skills in virtual reality, since combining different forms of feedback could foster students’ learning outcomes.

Abstract

This paper examines the learning experiences using student reflections. Data collection was carried out by prompting undergraduate students to reflect on their worst and best experiences, accomplishments, and what they learned through online collaborative activities. The theoretical framework used to explore these experiences was the Community of Inquiry model, which claims the optimal learning experience is at the intersection of three presences (Garrison, Anderson, and Archer, 2000). How can we use these student perceptions of their experiences to create optimal learning experiences in an online environment? Specific teacher characteristics, sense of community, learner effort, sense of improvement and progress, student expectations of online classes, and the impact of feelings and emotion on other presences are some of the themes that surfaced through content qualitative analysis in this study. Students also responded to a validated survey (explicitly prompting the CoI presences) which revealed the impact of lack of student interest in course topics. These themes are valuable because they reveal significant components of students’ learning experiences which can be used to recreate optimal experiences in other settings. This paper builds on the theoretical framework by adding the student perspective and offering a codebook for qualitative content analysis of reflections.

Abstract

This article examines the instructional practices used to teach the computer science (CS) standard of computer devices and systems to undergraduate preservice teachers (PSTs). With computer science education (CSE) gaining an international focus, there is a need to explore a variety of instructional practices used to teach these topics. This descriptive, exploratory case study presents an examination of the instructional practices used in a CSE licensure course. In this study, the instructor utilised two commercially available computer kits to provide hands-on, learner-centred learning experiences for PSTs. PSTs perceived these kits to be valuable for learning about computing devices and systems topics and for teaching these topics in their future classrooms. Additionally, results showed that PSTs considered the usability, grade level and ability of the kits to build interest in CS when reflecting on their future use. Limitations to the instructional practices included a lack of transfer to subject areas outside of CS and a lack of focus on the integration between hardware and software.

Abstract

Portfolios are often used in higher education for learning, promotion, assessment and appraisal. Thanks to technical developments in recent years, portfolios are increasingly digital rather than physical. E-portfolios provide a comprehensive way to document personal progress, to reflect on work activities, to support learning and to serve as a tool for feedback and evaluation. However, there has been very little research conducted on the use of e-portfolios for learning purposes in higher education. This paper focuses on the use of e-portfolios in teacher education. Six students in a master programme work with e-portfolios in the course of their practical vocational training. In a mixed-methods design, the students were interviewed about their experiences and the process of writing e-portfolios. In addition, a document analysis of the e-portfolio entries has been conducted in terms of content and structure. The findings of this study provide indications on how e-portfolios can be used effectively in teacher training and which promoting and inhibiting conditions students encounter.

Abstract

Investigating disengagement is a continuing concern within computer-based learning environments. Drawing upon several strands of research into preservice teacher learning with network-based tutors, this paper outlines an object orientation to conceptualize a type of disengaged behaviour referred to as carelessness. We further differentiate this construct in terms of carelessness towards one’s own learning as opposed to other’s learning. In support of our claims, we review research into carelessness in the context of nBrowser, an intelligent web browser designed to support preservice teachers learn about the pedagogical affordances of novel technologies while designing lesson plans. The key aspects of this research can be listed as follows: (1) a knowledge engineering approach to implement a set of production rules within the learning environment to detect instances of carelessness and intervene; (2) a data-driven approach to infer learner behaviours in their absence due to carelessness; and (3) a model-driven approach to improve the functioning of the learning environment despite instances of carelessness. We discuss the limitations of these different approaches and draw implications for future research into preservice teacher disengagement with computer-based learning environments.