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Josep-Anton Fernàndez

Abstract

This article provides an outline of the network of universities where Catalan is taught outside the Catalan-speaking territories. This network is coordinated and managed by the Institut Ramon Llull, the public body created by the governments of Catalonia and the Balearic Islands and the city of Barcelona with the mission to promote the Catalan language and culture abroad. It consists of 145 universities in 28 countries, of which 87 universities receive funding from the IRL. The article describes the main characteristics and activities of this network, defines the value it creates for the various stakeholders that participate in it, and outlines its main objectives and projects for the immediate future.

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Montserrat Bacardí

Abstract

One of the consequences of the 1939 exile was the widespread emergence, or re-emergence, of cultural community centres, periodicals and magazines, brief treatises and books that gave priority to local events over outside influences. Xavier Benguerel, Domènec Guansé, C. A. Jordana, Joan Oliver and Francesc Trabal, who formed the Chile group, held translation as their weapon of choice in the political and cultural struggle. Here, we look at the most remarkable achievements, collective strategies and ways of thinking about language and translation.

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Jordi Malé

Abstract

Carles Riba (1893–1959) wrote several articles in which he showed his commitment to literature and reflected on the role of literature in society, as “Socrates in front of the judges” (1926), “Politicians and Intellectuals” (1927), “Literature and Rescuing Groups” (1938) and the presentations of the Revista de Catalunya (1939 and 1955). Many of these texts were written in turbulent political contexts: the dictatorship of Primo de Rivera (1923–1929), the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939) and the post-war period under Franco (1939–1959). The aim of this paper is to study these articles and analyse Riba’s view of writers and intellectuals.

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Antoni Maestre-Brotons

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Xavier Ferré Trill

Abstract

The article lays out the conceptual bases that Manuel Pedrolo developed –in the form of philosophical literature – in a section of his narrative. I describe the directionality of the author’s intellectual program with regard to the ‘double liberation' in detail. The interest of the work lies in exposing the inherent limitations of ‘literature for literature’ – with disregard of human nature – that can also be applied to any international literature, not only written in the fifties and sixties, but in the (ideologically) present time.

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Montserrat Corretger

Abstract

The present article reflects on and emphasises the importance of the still-unrecognised work by Catalan writers who bore witness to the exile of 1939 and the preceding historical period of the Second Spanish Republic (1931–1939) and the Civil War (1936–1939). The article explores how these exiled writers and their literary corpora played a fundamental role in recovering Catalan historical collective memory and identity. In particular, it focusses on two writers, Domènec Guansé and Vicenç Riera Llorca, in the light of recent studies of literary history, which have begun this process of re-evaluating the literature of exile, and thereafter relates their work to the theories of Lowenthal, Ricoeur and Traverso regarding the past and memory.

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Magí Sunyer

Abstract

This article explores the characteristics of the literature of writers who, when literary Catalan modernism had died out, used many of the features of the movement in their work. An analysis of the costumbrism-based novel Perot i l’Estel (1932), by Antoni Fuster Valldeperes, shows the return to the debate on madness, the expression of individual standpoints and the portrayal of a wide range of revolutionary ideals, the main themes of which are Catalanism, universalism, Republicanism and anarchism.

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Pompeu Casanovas, Josep Monserrat and Wendy R. Simon

Abstract

This article can be read as an Editorial for the first issue of the Journal of Catalan Intellectual History (JOCIH) in its new stage at de Gruyter Open. It offers, first, a methodical review of the concept, roles, and trends of intellectual history in the 20th century. Next, it looks into the particular Catalan tradition, historiography, and cultural analysis to position the aim and the role of the Journal with regard to similar initiatives. It tries to give an answer to the crisis of intellectual history as a discipline, at the end of the past century. The third part of the article describes some of the available resources. The fourth section introduces the contents of the present issue, focussing on the construction of a collective identity and the literary engagement of Catalan writers between 1920 and 1980, either in their country or in exile. The Notes of the present issue highlight the importance of technology, natural language processing, and Semantic Web developments in carrying out contemporary research in this field.

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Joan-Josep Vallbé

Abstract

This paper discusses the relationship between the theory of art and the philosophy of science. In particular, it explores Catalan poet and critic Gabriel Ferrater’s theory of ideas in poetry and specifically his critique of social or realist poetry. The paper shows, on the one hand, that Ferrater’s theory is both antiexpressionist and anti-inductivist, and on the other, that his way of approaching both poetry and criticism can be integrated into the falsationist theoretical framework developed by philosopher of science Karl Popper to understand the process of scientific discovery.

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Vicent Salvador

Abstract

Joan Fuster’s essays constitute the observatory from which he examined the world, human beings and the life of society. In this observatory-cum-laboratory, Fuster used linguistics, culture, aesthetics, the sociopolitical context and history to construct his theory of social reality. He often focussed on literary phenomena – authors, genres, movements, styles and publishing processes – in the context of the vast process of social praxis, an ambit in which no element can be innocently isolated from any other, from the whole in which all things are interrelated. Fuster’s conception of literature thus adopts a perspective of complexity in which the idea of writers being socially engaged, of great influence at the time, is filtered by means of critical examination. This examination includes highly diverse and often contradictory factors that the author tries to balance against each other with an intellectual honesty that turns paradoxes into the driving force behind his writing.