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Martin Soukup

Abstract

The objective of the paper is to provide an overview of currencies used by natives of Near Oceania in relation to three principal ways of its use. The author explains three main functions of currencies from Near Oceania on selected examples. The three main functions are as follows: standardized medium of exchange, bride-price, and sociopolitical exchange. These functions are demonstrated on selected types of currencies from East Sepik, Massim, Western Highlands, and West Papua. The author provides, in addition to the description of artefacts, interpretation of social and cultural context of its use.

Open access

Pavel Onderka, Vlastimil Vrtal and Alexander Gatzsche

Abstract

The thirteenth excavation season of the Archaeological Expedition to Wad Ben Naga focused on archaeological exploration of the Typhonium (WBN 200) and the nearby cemetery WBN C200, as well as on conservation of structures located in Central Wad Ben Naga.

Open access

Pavel Onderka

Abstract

In 2012, the National Museum – Náprstek Museum accessioned a collection of 13 Egyptian antiquities from the original ownership of Jaroslav Šejnoha, who served as the Czechoslovak Ambassador to Egypt between 1944 and 1946. The collection consists of 13 highly interesting pieces, dating of which spans from the Pre-Dynastic to Greco-Roman Periods.

Open access

Filip Coppens

Abstract

The article takes a closer look at a specific feature of the Nile, and more in particular an aspect of its life bringing inundation known to the ancient Egyptian priests as Keku (“Darkness”). This facet of the inundation occurs seven times among the gifts brought by offering bearers in hydrological processions on the soubassement in the Horus temple of Edfu, the Opet temple at Karnak, the Hathor temple of Dendara and the small Isis temple of Dendara dating from the reigns of Ptolemaios IV Philopator (221–204 BCE) to that of Emperor Nero (54–68 CE). The study of its location on the temple walls as well as the inscriptions accompanying this specific personification of the Nile inundation indicates the existence of patterns in the distribution of these texts not only within a single temple, but also between temples over time and space.

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Helena Heroldová

Abstract

The study based on the preparation of Příběh Tibetu [The Story of Tibet] exhibition in the Náprstek Museum focuses on the de-contextualisation of Tibetan Buddhism objects in the museum setting. It deals with the stages of the decontextualisation process from the removing of the original material environment and social context to creation of new meanings in the museum. Namely it discusses aestheticisation and its relation to the art-gallery style exhibition.

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Gabriela Jungová

Abstract

J. V. Daneš (1880–1928) was not only an outstanding figure of his time in the international scientific community, but also a diplomat and a traveller. Two of his overseas trips led him to Australia and the Pacific region, where he assembled a remarkable collection of ethnographic objects and photographs. This collection, now kept in the National Museum – Náprstek Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures in Prague, has been mostly neglected and unpublished for decades. This paper provides a basis for its further study by introducing Daneš’s journeys around the region and comparing them to the proveniences of the ethnographic objects.

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Vlastimil Vrtal

Abstract

A group of six specimens of Late Roman pottery from the region of North Africa forms part of collections of the Náprstek Museum. The group comprises of vessels from several different functional types, forming a representative sample of the pottery production of the region. The paper discusses the setting of the individual vessels in the North African ceramic production, their dating, and provenance.

Open access

Gabriela Jungová and Jakub Pečený

Abstract

This paper reports conclusions from an anthropological analysis of a mummy bundle from the Azapa Valley in northern Chile. The mummy was acquired by Dr. Václav Šolc in 1966–1967. The bundle was examined with the use of computed tomography (CT) and the results were compared to unpublished findings from 2009. The remains are that of an infant that died of unknown causes. The possible presence of Harris lines suggests that the individual suffered from stress during their life. The mummification process was in all probability spontaneous.

Open access

Lubica Oktábcová, Gabriela Jungová, Jiří Bučil, Jakub Pečený and Pavel Onderka

Abstract

The paper presents results of CT and external examination of seven ancient Egyptian mummified isolated human heads from the collections of the National Museum – Náprstek Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures. It is the first preliminary outcome regarding isolated parts of mummies from a multi-disciplinary project that aims to map all ancient Egyptian mummified material in public collections of the Czech Republic. The heads are well preserved and exhibit a variety of mummification techniques and materials.