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Tereza Hejzlarová

Abstract

Jewellery occupied an important place in the various life stages of Central Asian women. Individual jewels that formed sets depending on which parts of the body they were worn on had in a steady form and a particular meaning in the past. Most of the items of jewellery were designed to decorate the upper half of the body, and among the most numerous sets there was a set of head ornaments. These were mainly various types of diadems, paired and individual pendants that were attached to the headdress or to the hair and, last but not least, earrings of various shapes and sizes. The collections of the Náprstek Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures feature a set of head ornaments from Uzbekistan dating back to the late 19th and early 20th century when the jeweller’s creations of the region were still of high quality. The set is represented by jewellery of three local styles – Samarkand, Bukhara and Tashkent.

Open access

Helena Heroldová

Abstract

The Náprstek Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures acquired two hundred items from Tibet in the 1950s: bronze sculptures, paintings and ritual implements. These items came from private collections confiscated after the Second War World according to the presidential decrees dealing with the post-war state reconstruction. Although the administration of the confiscated properties was meticulous, the transfer of items to the Náprstek Museum interrupted the history of ownership and meant the loss of the historical knowledge of its origin. As the result, the Tibet collection in the Náprstek Museum reveals more about the political and social history of post-war Czechoslovakia than about the perception of Tibetan culture in Czechoslovakia during the first half of the 20th century.

Open access

Adéla Jůnová Macková

Abstract

The study will explore the family and the family milieu of the first Czechoslovak Egyptologist František Lexa, founder and first director of the Czechoslovak Institute of Egyptology, expert on Egyptian philology, especially demotic languages, and mentor of two important Egyptologists, Jaroslav Černý, professor at Oxford University, and Zbyněk Žába, professor at Charles University, Prague. The study will analyse the social status of Lexa’s family and the importance of his marriage in shaping his scientific life and consider the everyday routines of this scientist’s household, including the claims demanded by the requirements of bringing up three children. As a specific focus, we will try to introduce the everyday life of a travelling scientist, particularly during holidays spent with family abroad, and illuminate the significance of summer retreats in shaping a scientists’ familial travel experience.

Open access

Burkart Ullrich, Pavel Onderka and Vlastimil Vrtal

Abstract

Within the framework of the Archaeological Expedition to Wad Ben Naga, a non-invasive, geophysical survey was conducted at the archaeological site of Wad Ben Naga, Sudan, in the course of the mission’s fifteenth season. The objective of the survey was to explore selected parts of Central Wad Ben Naga, to map surface and subsurface structures. Almost 500 distinct anomalies were detected using a ten-sensor gradiometer array LEA MAX and interpreted in the context of the site’s development.

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Pavel Onderka, Vlastimil Vrtal and Gabriela Jungová

Abstract

The fifteenth excavation season of the Archaeological Expedition to Wad Ben Naga focused on the archaeological exploration of the Palace of Queen Amanishakheto (WBN 100) and rescue excavation of a kom located in the exclave of the archaeological site west of the railway (WBN 1000 and WBN C220).

Open access

Alena Krejčová

Abstract

The paper focuses on the traveller Barbora Markéta Eliášová as an individual and on the collection of items that she brought from her travels and, after her death, willed to the collections of the Náprstek Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures.

Open access

David Jeřábek

Abstract

In the 1980s, the excavations of the Czechoslovak Institute of Egyptology headed by Miroslav Verner excavated large parts of the pyramid complex of King Raneferef (Neferefre)2 and uncovered evidence of the mortuary cult of the king, including ca. one thousand of clay sealings (or sealing fragments). Out of them, a corpus of over three hundred sealings was acquired by National Museum – Náprstek Museum of Asian, African and American Cultures. In most aspects, they make a representative sample of the whole corpus. This paper presents in summary properties of the corpus relevant to the interpretation of the temple administration as it is reflected in the sealing activity.3 After a brief introduction to the site and the organization of the excavated corpus, the attention will be focused particularly on the general patterns of the distribution of sealings with regard to space, type, and attested epigraphical features (titles, names of gods and institutions, other iconographical features), as these are the means to uncover potential correlations between the activity of holders of particular offices (or representatives of particular institutions), particular parts of the temple and particular types of sealings (i.e. particular kinds of sealed containers).

Open access

Gabriela Jungová

Abstract

J. V. Daneš’s collection of the National Museum – Náprstek Museum includes over 700 ethnographic objects from the entire Pacific area. The collection is mostly unpublished, and some of the objects never had their provenience established. The present paper introduces 46 indigenous wooden weapons – clubs and sticks, boomerangs, spears, shields and spear throwers – from Australia.