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Ján Sabol

Abstract

The study reflects on divergence between theatre and film. It also points out that the difference ought to be sought in ontology, in the principle of the coding of actual reality by using film or theatrical language. In the perception of a syncretic work that connects the elements of both types of art, the viewer a priori perceives theatrical mimesis (and also the execution of theatrical mise-en-scène) as an “alien” element used by the film “language” of a concrete cinematographic work. The perception of such a work assumes the viewer’s readiness and willingness to accept a hybrid work, which inevitably calls for a different manner of decoding the narrative offered. If we are to summarise the hitherto knowledge which elucidates the relationship between theatre and film (in the manner in which actual reality is mimicked and in the subsequent execution of theatrical and film mise-en-scène), it may be concluded that, as opposed to film, theatre enjoys a unique opportunity to imitate actual reality by performing which takes place in real time and in direct interaction between the actor and the viewer. The film conveys this using filmmaking devices.

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Dáša Čiripová

Abstract

The study explores the art of performance and happening in Slovakia from the 1960s, and its influence on theatre. Given its interdisciplinarity, the first part is dedicated to the vantage points of performance in Slovakia: action art and related names. Action art had significant influence on later theatre performative forms. The second part focuses in detail on actions and performances by the company Temporary Society of Intense Experience, Balvan Theatre and on the artist Miloš Karásek.

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Zuzana Spodniaková

Abstract

The study presents an overview and analysis of contemporary Moscow productions inspired by the personality and work of the legendary Russian actor and poet of the latter half of the 20th century, singer and songwriter Vladimir Semyonovich Vysotsky (1938 – 1980). The authoress covers both the older productions which have been on the repertoires of theatres for several years and more recent productions staged this year on the occasion of the artist’s unlived 80th birthday. Researching on the productions by different theatre makers, staged by various theatres and drama ensembles, points at the importance and up-to-dateness of the creative legacy of Vladimir Vysotsky and at the significance of him as a personality that has become a legend and a component part of the cultural history of Soviet and post-Soviet eras. The productions constitute a significant part of the unwavering cult of his personality.

Open access

Jan Motal

Abstract

The presented article is a polemic with Alain Badiou’s concept of theatre-politics isomorphism. The author adapts the basic elements of Badiou’s philosophy (event, void Ø, truth etc.), provides an interpretation of his theory of theatre and presents crucial critical arguments to reveal the reductionism of Badiou’s philosophy. Subsequently, the author presents his alternative theory of theatre based on this ground. The article assumes that theatre performance is a live, truthful event, an encounter of humans experiencing an imagined Utopia based on their structural homology (shared materiality, phylogenetic archetypal memory, existentiality). The argument is supported by the recent research in neuroscience.

As the article argues, this Utopia has its social and political significance. The theatre is not political only if it constructs both a political body (crowd, public) and a discourse, as Badiou suggests. The author concludes that theatre is inherently political because its imaginative nature, which allows humans to experience the utopical attachment exceeding the subject-object boundaries. This imagined Utopia with its critical and anticipative power allows people to transcend their singularity to interpersonal and intercultural dialogue and universality, and it provokes their political imagination (in the sense of David Graeber). The author employs Erika Fischer-Lichte’s concept of performativity to present theatre performance as an event.

Open access

Expressional Bipolarity of Theatre

(Selected Case Studies in Contemporary Theatre)

Miroslav Ballay

Abstract

The author contemplates expressional bipolarity of contemporary art of theatre. He is personally interested in whether theatre has yet a chance to purify spectators. He explores theatre in terms of reception, and also focuses on the methods of addressing the themes of the day. Using case studies of selected productions in contemporary theatre, he reflects on the intentions of a number of theatre directors whose particular intention is for the theatre to provoke or manipulate spectators.

Open access

Alexander Dubček Twice – An (Un)Known Side of Him

Selected Facts and Connections in Drama and Film Fiction Package

Dagmar Podmaková

Abstract

The authoress, using two visual works, i.e. theatre production #dubček and film Dubček (both 2018), compares two different approaches to and forms of the work with the personality of Alexander Dubček against the backdrop of the reforms and political upheaval in Czecho-Slovakia1, in 1968. Theatre production #dubček (Aréna Theatre, Bratislava, direction Michal Skočovský) has three levels. The first one is acting game having the form of a rehearsal of a new text about the politician Alexander Dubček; its component part is the projection of period archival film shots. The second level involves the actors stepping out of characters and commenting on Dubček’s attitude and on historical events. The third level entails monologue scenes, in which actors reveal their personal attitudes via narrated stories at the time of normalization2 which had a negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of people. In the film Dubček (Slovak-Czech co-production, direction Ladislav Halama), through Dubček’s reminiscing the past, political events interweave with the scenes from the life of Dubček’s family. Although both the works employ period image documentary material and fiction, they fail to create a dramatic conflict and they are illustrative for the bigger part.

Open access

Year 1948: Emancipation of Women and Slovak Theatre.

Contribution to the History of Gender Relations in Slovakia

Nadežda Lindovská

Abstract

From the cultural and art point of view, the year 1948 in Czechoslovakia was not just the so-called “Victorious February” of the working people. The remarkable phenomenon of this era, which was related to the post-war political and social movement, was the phenomenon of female emancipation and feminization of the stage production. During the two consecutive theatre seasons 1947/1948 and 1948/1949, at The New Scene Theatre of the National Theatre in Bratislava, several women, led by the director Magda Husaková-Lokvencová created several productions. For the first time, a sovereign feminine alliance had emerged in our performance art, proving that conceptual and thoughtful theatrical production may not be just the domain of men. These women contributed to deconstructing the beliefs of typically male and typically female professions as well as transforming traditional views of the role and position of both sexes in society and the arts. The attention of theatre historiography in the recapitalization of the impacts of the breakthrough events of the Czechoslovak post-war politics of the forty years on cultural events so far focused mainly on the issues of dramaturgy and poetics, the process of ideological transformation and the sovietisation of art in the spirit of socialist realism. The subject of socialist emancipation and theatre was at the edge of the interest of our theatrology. Ten years ago, a collective monograph, dedicated to the first lady of the Slovak theatre directors, Magda Husaková-Lokvencová, managing to free her forgotten personality and work and return her to the context of Slovak theatre history in the second half of the 20th century. There is still room for further research, complementing the knowledge and reflection of the advent of women in the sphere of theatre directory, dramaturgy and scenography artwork, as part of the history of gender relations in Slovakia. Increased interest in the history of women provokes a new reflection on the issue of emancipation and theatre.

Open access

Lucia Mihálová

Abstract

The study deals with forms of the Slovak Republic (1939 – 1945) in Slovak theatre after the year 2000. We currently observe a strong dramaturgical tendency to bring to the stages the reflection of historical events from various historical periods, one of the most depicted being the period of World War II. Its thematics are found in the productions of the original theatrical plays as well as in the dramatisations of literary works. The first part of the study is devoted to delineation of the Slovak Republic (1939 – 1945) in the productions after 2000 (Tiso [Tiso], Stalo sa prvého septembra [It Happened on 1st September], Rabínka [The Female Rabbi], Holokaust [Holocaust], Povstanie [Uprising], Obchod na korze [The Shop on the Parade], Polnočná omša [Midnight Mass], Tichý bič [The Silent Whip], Kým kohút nezaspieva [Until the Cock Sings]). The second part is focused on the analysis of the selected thematic elements offered by the productions falling within this circle and which appear in the new optics of the so-called second generation.

Open access

Zuzana Spodniaková

Abstract

The author focuses on selected productions of this year’s special program category of the Russian Theatre Festival Golden Mask 2018 – Russian Case in Moscow. The comparison of the latest productions of different genres and artistic aesthetics reveals the common interest of their creators in urgent socio-cultural and historical-political themes. The Russian Case category introduced Russian theatre this year as an increasingly active tool for social engagement, which is concerned with the present or the past of the nation or individual. With the vision of a better future, creators confront themselves with collective and individual memories and seek ways to cope with them in an artistic and human way.

Open access

Vít Pokorný

Abstract

The study represents the life and artistic career of today’s almost forgotten theatre director Milan Svoboda (1883 – 1948). It is based on the extensive Svoboda estate, located in the Theatre Department of the National Museum. It follows the artist from his amateur beginnings in Roudnice nad Labem, through his career as a pedagogue at the Prague Conservatory, theatre director at the Slovak National Theatre, guest director at the National Theatre in Prague, to his post-war effort to create high-quality stage art in the border villages abandoned by the Germans. Thanks to the substantial and rich material found in his estate, the study demonstrates the conflict of creative ideals and the desire to seek an aesthetic beauty in a world within a regimented state, grand political scheming, critics and “progressive” theatrical colleagues.