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Open access

Pavol Rybár, Pavel Hronček, Lucia Domaracká, Dana Tometzová and Miloš Jesenský

Abstract

In the first part of the study, we have pointed out that mining tourism is a new, undervalued and less used a form of tourism, geotourism. We present its definition and present its specifics that make it unique on such a scale - by which it can be defined as a separate form of tourism. Mining tourism can be thought to contain virtually all objects, phenomena and processes, which, from prehistory till today, were related to one of the oldest human activities - mining and their subsequent access to and inclusion in tourism. In the world, underground quarries are currently used for various purposes, such as environmental, cultural centers, concert halls, wineries, churches, warehouses, and tourist destinations.In the second part of the study, we deal with mining tourism on the example of the most extensive underground stone quarry in Slovakia. Quarry, Veľká Stráň currently serves as the goal of unorganized ‘mining‘ natural tourism as part of a geological site protected as a nature reserve. However, underground stone has the potential to become the destination of organized mining tourism not only for school educational excursions but also for the general public.

Open access

Francesca R. Lugeri, Piero Farabollini, Nicola Lugeri, Vittorio Amadio and Fabio Baiocco

Abstract

The geological landscape is an excellent topic for a better enhancement of the sustainable tourism. Considering Landscape as the result of the endogenous and exogenous activities that form the Earth's surface, and/or as the result of the interaction of many natural and cultural components, it is almost mandatory the use of such a theme as an informative vector in Environment Sciences popularization. Modern technology offers new powerful tools to reach and share a complete knowledge on the territory (intended as the integration between natural and cultural components). The overlay of thematic maps (geological, geomorphological, physiographic maps) as well as the integration of collected data allows us to identify the areas of greater natural and cultural value. The outdoor sports, expecially cycling and ski, give us an opportunity to talk about the territory, referring to its natural and cultural history; GIS and 3D modelling, are flexible and friendly tools in educational plans as well as in territorial promotion, fitting for the purpose of a twinning with TV sport transmission, as confirmed by the GeoloGiro experience (Geology at the Giro d’Italia 2013/14/15/16). The prototypical App here proposed, will show the landscape where the sports are played, through the visualisation of thematic maps and correlated images (3D modelling, animation, cartoons) integrating information on local environment and culture: the “LandscApp”. We argue that special attention should be devoted to the link between landscapes, wine tourism and sports, and that this new field would spur new actions to promote sustainable development in Italy, as well as a more sensible culture of responsible wine consumption.

Open access

Jakub Jirásek, Lenka Petrušková and Martin Sivek

Abstract

In the Ostrava part of the Upper Silesian Basin there are many geotouristic sites connected with the underground mining of Carboniferous bituminous coal. Text is focused on those related to the geology of the Basin and environmental issues connected to coal mining. Of great intrest are outcrops of Mississippian sediments of the paralic Ostrava Formation, as well as two most important museums with permanent geological exhibitions. Some interesting geological features conncted to younger periods of Quarternary glaciation are also mentioned. Two types of publicly accessible sites related to the environmental burdens (burning coal heaps, saline mine water drainage system) are also described.

Open access

Aleksandar Antić and Nemanja Tomić

Abstract

The region of Homolje in Eastern Serbia represents an area rich with numerous geological and geomorphological features, especially karst formations which are excellent representatives of this area’s geodiversity. However, the geotourism potential of these geosites still remains fully unrevealed. In this paper we analyzed the most representative ones based mainly on their aesthetic value as well as their geotourism potential. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the geotourism potential of Homolje and to determine its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats as well as interactions between them when it comes to tourism development. The results of the SWOT and TOWS analysis indicate that Homolje as a tourist destination possesses immense geotourism potential but is still in the exploration phase according to the Butler tourist cycle of destination evolution. Research results also identify four different strategies which can be applied as solutions for current problems and for further tourism development.

Open access

Thomas A. Hose

Abstract

The Peak District is an upland region in central Britain with a rich mining geoheritage. It was established as the UK’s first National Park in 1951. It was the region, due to its widespread loss quarries and mines sites to inappropriate remedial measures, which led to the recognition and promotion of the modern geotourism paradigm. It is the birthplace of British geotourism with the earliest recorded instances of leisure travellers purposefully choosing to visit mines and caves. Metalliferous mining in the region can be traced back to the Bronze Age. Gangue minerals, especially fluorspar and barites, later became significant primary extraction activities and underpinned a small-scale semi-precious stone industry. It is home to the World Heritage inscribed site of the Derwent Mills, significant in the development of early Industrial Revolution textile technology and manufacturing practices. The almost equally significant mining geoheritage has yet to be similarly recognised and, indeed, its survival is still threatened because most tourism and many mining geoheritage stakeholders have a limited understanding of geo-history and the geo-interpretive significance of the individuals and geosites that shaped historical geotourism and geological exploration in the Peak District; their exploits and the legacy of their publications, alongside its superbly exposed and well researched geology and associated mining geoheritage, could underpin a bid for the region’s recognition as a geopark. Hence, this introductory paper summarises the key aspects of the region’s geology and major mining geoheritage sites, together with the major works and influence of some key individuals that should be included as a very minimum in such a bid.

Open access

Malwina Kobylańska

Abstract

The experience of recent years shows that geotourism in post-mining objects has got a large development potential due to, among others, moving away from the typical museums to modern tourism products much more engaging visitors and the transition from the idea of 3S (sun, sand, sea) for 3E (experiment, excitement, education) and 4H (heritage, handicraft, habitat, history). In the article the specifics of the tourism product in projects related to the adaptation and using of post-mining objects and sites were presented. The article presents an assessment of the possibility of building a branded tourist product based on the relics of the mining industry in the context of the development and implementation of subsequent phases of the project consisting in making these relics available to tourists. The examples of completed projects, among others, in Poland and Germany were used. The division of the primary and secondary value of the geotourist project and the activities affecting the increase of these values were proposed. The article also raises issues of variation in demand for mining heritage products and the economic viability of such projects, as well as the recommendations for future investor in the post-mining tourism’ venture were specified.

Open access

George Ariya, Noah Sitati and Bob Wishitemi

Abstract

Although literature has documented many destination attributes that determine attractiveness of tourism destination, the magnitude and strength of each attribute has not been explored, especially in relation to a single wildlife tourism product. This study provides an insight into the level of tourists’ perceived value on wildlife resource attributes at Lake Nakuru National Park in Kenya, with a further comparison between the international and domestic tourists. The study adopted a cross-sectional survey and collected primary data using self-administered structured questionnaires. A total of 402 respondents duly completed the questionnaires, which were disseminated through simple random sampling. Data was analysed descriptively and through independent sample T-test. The results showed that unique wildlife attractions were most valued by tourists (M = 2.26, SD = 0.99), followed by the variety of attractions (M = 2.53, SD = 1.08) and their abundance (M = 2.59, SD = 1.19) respectively. Majority of international tourists highly valued the attributes [M = 2.30, SD = 0.88; t(400) = 4.18, p < 0.001] as compared to the domestic tourists (M = 2.67, SD = 0.88), but with a small magnitude (η = 0.04). The study provides an insight that tourists value the park because of its uniqueness due to a variety of wildlife attractions. As park ecological challenges persist, park managers may re-brand the park by creating more emphasis on other key wildlife products like rhinos in order to maintain visitor value and satisfaction in the future.

Open access

Oliver Chikuta, Forbes Kabote and Nyasha Chikanya

Abstract

The market of tourists with disabilities consists of a sizeable percentage of total tourism and is rapidly growing globally but little is known about tour guides experiences with them. These tourists with disabilities seem to have less holiday offers thereby reducing the frequency of tour guide encounters with them. While most tourism literature supports tour guides and their contribution to tourist experience, very little research is done in developing countries to show experiences of tour guides with tourists with disabilities. There is a knowledge gap of how the interactions between the guide and tourists with disabilities participating in the guided tours influence the tour guides’ experience. Using face to face interviews and focus group discussions with tour guides the study sought to establish people with disabilities types of holidays, concerns they raise during tours and challenges encountered by tour guides when touring with PwD. Non-probability, namely convenience and judgemental sampling methods were followed to pick tour guides from museums and national parks. Study results revealed the activities that tour guides are offering people with disabilities, guides’ own choice of activities for tourists with disabilities and the challenges faced by tour guides in the provision of those activities. The study concludes that the guiding industry has inadequate information about tourists with disabilities and thus is failing to fully serve the market. Lastly the study provides a set of recommendations that can be used by the tour guiding industry in order to effectively serve the market of tourists with disabilities.

Open access

Kayleigh Jones and Miguel Moital

Abstract

This research explored the techniques employed by event managers to create event prestige value for VIPs in a corporate events context. Research on prestige has mainly focused on the attributes that deliver prestige value (the prestige values). However, by focusing on those delivering prestige (as opposed to the recipients of prestige), this research identified two deeper, less explicit mechanisms required to deliver prestigious experiences, labelled Interaction and Principles. By identifying a more comprehensive set of techniques, those designing VIP experiences will be better equipped to satisfy the prestige needs of VIPs.

Open access

Luke L. Whalin and Walter E. Block

Abstract

Why is it that young Italian-American men were shooting each other over turf during the prohibition of alcohol in the 20th century, and young African-American men are shooting each other over turf in the 21st? Was this just a historical accident? Could it easily have been the other way around? That is the question with which the present paper attempts to wrestle.