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Open access

Marek W. Lorenc and H. Lorenc

Abstract

Stone is the oldest, natural material, which was (and still is) used as both building and sculptural material. The most commonly used for these purposes are: granites, marbles, limestones and sandstones, representing the three main genetic groups of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. All of them are permanently being destroyed in result as well of natural weathering as microbiological activity and anthropogenic pollution of atmosphere, known as deterioration. The speed of such decay depends on both environmental conditions and mineral composition of the stone and it can lead to such intensive destruction that conservation may require partial replacement. Smaller damages are refilled with appropriate mineral masses, whereas in case of bigger damages refilling with natural stone is necessary. Professional conservation practice demands the selection and use of the same rock or the rock that is, in so far as is possible, identical to that originally used. It can be done only after previous detailed petrographical studies of the original material. Only then the stone material used for reconstruction will be appropriate and stonework performed properly will not (or almost not) leave marks. In many cases the ancient quarries do not exist and original source material is not available. Then petrographical studies of numerous rock-samples, which are recently available from other existing and/or working quarries, will allow the indication the most similar material. In many cases, unfortunately, the stone used for replacement is not identical to the original but only macroscopically similar. In such a case results might be visible sooner or later. These will be differences in colour, differences in structure and in some cases even crystallization of secondary minerals in the newly inserted fragments.

Open access

Jan Golonka, Maria Barmuta and Jan Barmuta

Abstract

In the paper authors present some geological sites from Kaczawa Unit, Sudetes, Poland, and their interpretation in a geotectonic context. All described geosites are important for understanding the evolution of so called Kaczawa Accretionary Prism as well as whole Sudetes. Presented outcrops are easily accessible, well exposed and exhibits high education value. Special attention was given to the Wojcieszów Limestones and their relationship to the surrounding rocks

Open access

Nathaniel G. Goki, Shekwonyadu Iyakwari and Allu A. Umbugadi

Abstract

The potential for geotourism and mining heritage of some landscapes in parts of Kaduna, Plateau, Nasarawa and Kwara states in central Nigeria were studied and compiled. The result show that geological endowments range from insalbergs, flood basalts and dome structures, which presents natural landscape for tourism. The quartzite ridges of the Oreke area in Ilorin host the Owu Falls of 120m cascading waters, the Kafanchan flood basalts that flowed extensively from the Kagoro hills with extensive columnar jointing creating the prestigious water falls of over 30m all present versed potential for geotourism. Mining activity around the Jos Plateau (Bassa, Jos, Bukuru, Barakin Ladi and Bokkos areas), southern Kaduna (Godogodo and Jagindi) create landscapes that if properly beautified can become tourist landmarks. Adopting and harnessing these landscapes can boost and provide alternative revenue for the affected central.

Open access

Jari K. Nenonen and Svetlana V. Stepanova

Abstract

The Finnish-Russian borderland has a unique geological potential for geological tourism development. Creating new tourist attractions based on geoheritage, design and development of the cross-border tourist routes open new opportunities for tourism development on both sides of the border. The article presents the crossborder geological tourist route “Mining Road” as a tool of activation of tourist activity in the Finnish-Russian borderland. This article explores the practical aspects of the project "Mining Road" development for tourism industry. It is proven the significance of cross-border route "Mining road" for preservation, popularization and reproduction of the natural, cultural and historical potential of the borderland.

Open access

Pavol Rybár, Pavel Hronček, Lucia Domaracká, Dana Tometzová and Miloš Jesenský

Abstract

In the first part of the study, we have pointed out that mining tourism is a new, undervalued and less used a form of tourism, geotourism. We present its definition and present its specifics that make it unique on such a scale - by which it can be defined as a separate form of tourism. Mining tourism can be thought to contain virtually all objects, phenomena and processes, which, from prehistory till today, were related to one of the oldest human activities - mining and their subsequent access to and inclusion in tourism. In the world, underground quarries are currently used for various purposes, such as environmental, cultural centers, concert halls, wineries, churches, warehouses, and tourist destinations.In the second part of the study, we deal with mining tourism on the example of the most extensive underground stone quarry in Slovakia. Quarry, Veľká Stráň currently serves as the goal of unorganized ‘mining‘ natural tourism as part of a geological site protected as a nature reserve. However, underground stone has the potential to become the destination of organized mining tourism not only for school educational excursions but also for the general public.

Open access

Francesca R. Lugeri, Piero Farabollini, Nicola Lugeri, Vittorio Amadio and Fabio Baiocco

Abstract

The geological landscape is an excellent topic for a better enhancement of the sustainable tourism. Considering Landscape as the result of the endogenous and exogenous activities that form the Earth's surface, and/or as the result of the interaction of many natural and cultural components, it is almost mandatory the use of such a theme as an informative vector in Environment Sciences popularization. Modern technology offers new powerful tools to reach and share a complete knowledge on the territory (intended as the integration between natural and cultural components). The overlay of thematic maps (geological, geomorphological, physiographic maps) as well as the integration of collected data allows us to identify the areas of greater natural and cultural value. The outdoor sports, expecially cycling and ski, give us an opportunity to talk about the territory, referring to its natural and cultural history; GIS and 3D modelling, are flexible and friendly tools in educational plans as well as in territorial promotion, fitting for the purpose of a twinning with TV sport transmission, as confirmed by the GeoloGiro experience (Geology at the Giro d’Italia 2013/14/15/16). The prototypical App here proposed, will show the landscape where the sports are played, through the visualisation of thematic maps and correlated images (3D modelling, animation, cartoons) integrating information on local environment and culture: the “LandscApp”. We argue that special attention should be devoted to the link between landscapes, wine tourism and sports, and that this new field would spur new actions to promote sustainable development in Italy, as well as a more sensible culture of responsible wine consumption.

Open access

Jakub Jirásek, Lenka Petrušková and Martin Sivek

Abstract

In the Ostrava part of the Upper Silesian Basin there are many geotouristic sites connected with the underground mining of Carboniferous bituminous coal. Text is focused on those related to the geology of the Basin and environmental issues connected to coal mining. Of great intrest are outcrops of Mississippian sediments of the paralic Ostrava Formation, as well as two most important museums with permanent geological exhibitions. Some interesting geological features conncted to younger periods of Quarternary glaciation are also mentioned. Two types of publicly accessible sites related to the environmental burdens (burning coal heaps, saline mine water drainage system) are also described.

Open access

Aleksandar Antić and Nemanja Tomić

Abstract

The region of Homolje in Eastern Serbia represents an area rich with numerous geological and geomorphological features, especially karst formations which are excellent representatives of this area’s geodiversity. However, the geotourism potential of these geosites still remains fully unrevealed. In this paper we analyzed the most representative ones based mainly on their aesthetic value as well as their geotourism potential. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the geotourism potential of Homolje and to determine its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats as well as interactions between them when it comes to tourism development. The results of the SWOT and TOWS analysis indicate that Homolje as a tourist destination possesses immense geotourism potential but is still in the exploration phase according to the Butler tourist cycle of destination evolution. Research results also identify four different strategies which can be applied as solutions for current problems and for further tourism development.

Open access

Thomas A. Hose

Abstract

The Peak District is an upland region in central Britain with a rich mining geoheritage. It was established as the UK’s first National Park in 1951. It was the region, due to its widespread loss quarries and mines sites to inappropriate remedial measures, which led to the recognition and promotion of the modern geotourism paradigm. It is the birthplace of British geotourism with the earliest recorded instances of leisure travellers purposefully choosing to visit mines and caves. Metalliferous mining in the region can be traced back to the Bronze Age. Gangue minerals, especially fluorspar and barites, later became significant primary extraction activities and underpinned a small-scale semi-precious stone industry. It is home to the World Heritage inscribed site of the Derwent Mills, significant in the development of early Industrial Revolution textile technology and manufacturing practices. The almost equally significant mining geoheritage has yet to be similarly recognised and, indeed, its survival is still threatened because most tourism and many mining geoheritage stakeholders have a limited understanding of geo-history and the geo-interpretive significance of the individuals and geosites that shaped historical geotourism and geological exploration in the Peak District; their exploits and the legacy of their publications, alongside its superbly exposed and well researched geology and associated mining geoheritage, could underpin a bid for the region’s recognition as a geopark. Hence, this introductory paper summarises the key aspects of the region’s geology and major mining geoheritage sites, together with the major works and influence of some key individuals that should be included as a very minimum in such a bid.

Open access

Malwina Kobylańska

Abstract

The experience of recent years shows that geotourism in post-mining objects has got a large development potential due to, among others, moving away from the typical museums to modern tourism products much more engaging visitors and the transition from the idea of 3S (sun, sand, sea) for 3E (experiment, excitement, education) and 4H (heritage, handicraft, habitat, history). In the article the specifics of the tourism product in projects related to the adaptation and using of post-mining objects and sites were presented. The article presents an assessment of the possibility of building a branded tourist product based on the relics of the mining industry in the context of the development and implementation of subsequent phases of the project consisting in making these relics available to tourists. The examples of completed projects, among others, in Poland and Germany were used. The division of the primary and secondary value of the geotourist project and the activities affecting the increase of these values were proposed. The article also raises issues of variation in demand for mining heritage products and the economic viability of such projects, as well as the recommendations for future investor in the post-mining tourism’ venture were specified.