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Monika Modrzejewska-Świgulska

Abstract

The aim of this work is to reconstruct the convictions and opinions of Polish female film directors concerning work competences that actuate work and success in the field of film directing. Qualitative data are presented in the text, which were collected by the Author herself in free interviews carried out with twelve Polish female film directors.

Open access

Dorota M. Jankowska and Iwona Omelańczuk

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to weigh the empirical and hypothetical evidence to assess the claim that imaginative play supports the acquisition and development of social and emotional competence. We analyse children’s play and social skills using a development-based perspective. On this basis, we describe the developmental trajectories of imaginative play and the components of socio-emotional competence during childhood, especially in the pre-school period. In addition, we review the research literature on the possible link between imaginative play and creativity in children, and on how this type of play is predictive of later life creativity. Finally, we discuss hypothetical mechanisms that may account for the relationship between imaginative play and social competence in the preschool years and beyond.

Open access

Beata Kunat

Abstract

In this paper I will attempt to compare two categories of passion and creativity. I will try to answer the question: What has passion got in common with creativity? What is the common denominator and what is different? What is the role of passion in the creative process? Searching for the mechanism of passion and its components is necessary to discover its relation to creativity I will refer to passion psychology (Vallerand, 2015). The basis of my analysis will be the Dualistic Model of Passion (Vallerand et al., 2003; Vallerand 2008, 2010, 2015), the concept of Grit: The Power of Passion and Perserverance (Duckworth et al., 2007; Duckworth & Quinn, 2009, Duckworth 2016) and the concept of Flow (Csíkszentmihályi, 1996). In the process of mapping the areas that connect passion with creativity I will refer to four ways of its understanding: creativity as a process, a personality trait complex, a product and the interaction between the creative individual and the context or environment. I will also refer in my comparisons to The four C Model of Creativity (Kaufman & Beghetto 2009).

Open access

Ahmed M. Abdulla, Mark A. Runco, Hanadi N. Alsuwaidi and Huda S. Alhindal

Abstract

Personal obstacles to creativity were investigated by sampling 297 Arab women from four Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries: Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. The Obstacles to Personal Creativity Inventory, as self-report, was used. It assesses four types of obstacles (a) inhibition/shyness, (b) lack of time/opportunity, (c) social repression, and (d) lack of motivation. The results showed that the highest mean was reported for the lack of time/opportunities factor, followed in order by the three other factors: lack of motivation, inhibition/shyness, and social repression. (A high mean is indicative of more obstacles.) A multivariate analysis of variance indicated that reported obstacles to creativity significantly differed by field of study. Women in the arts reported experiencing fewer obstacles related to social repression in comparison with women in engineering, who showed the highest mean. No significant effects were observed for level of education, country and income in the GCC countries. The MANOVA also showed significant interactions between (a) education and sector (i.e., government vs private), (b) country and sector, (c) income and field of study, and finally (d) between field of study and sector. Results from this study were compared to two other studies, in Brazil and Mexico, that used the Obstacles to Personal Creativity Inventory. The high mean found for the lack of motivation in GCC countries deserves further investigation, given that motivation is so important for creativity and often is something that can be encouraged.

Open access

Jessica Jacobs

Abstract

As the problem-solving methodology of design thinking has gained legitimacy in business and educational environments, this article suggests we also think about incorporating “art thinking” into approaches in design pedagogy. To study what skills and techniques can be useful in other disciplines, we can first review the stages of the creative process which are centered around preparation, incubation, ideation, illumination, and evaluation. Within those stages, we can tease out specific elements unique to the artistic process that can be particularly useful, including mindsets of emotional engagement, intuition, and tolerance of ambiguity as well as cognitive strategies such as the use of metacognition, resource banks, generators and constraints, prolonged research, problem-creation, conversation with the work, closure delay, and reflection and thematic coherence. Emphasizing these elements and strategies in design pedagogy can expand possibilities for creativity and innovation.

Open access

Kamila Witerska

Abstract

The text is a case study report concerning research on a drama/theatre project called Jutka’s Sleeplessness that was performed in the public space of Łódź. The purpose of the research was to address the question of how this creative - new and valuable product - in the form of the drama/ theatre project Jutka’s Sleeplessness was created and what aspect of creativity decides on the success of a project that combines drama with theatre. The discussion represents an attempt to demonstrate how the four Ps of creativity work in a drama/theatre project.

Open access

Wendy Ross and Frédéric Vallée-Tourangeau

Abstract

Folk and scholarly conjectures on the nature of creative genius often focus on intrapsychic processes: The explanations centre on the person, the creator, transcending the more prosaic forces that shape everyday, routine cognition. Focusing on the alleged extraordinary character of a creator deflects attention from the emergent, distributed and relational nature of creativity. A more productive research agenda considers a range of factors, operating at different time scales, that guide and constrain the manufacture of creativity. We argue that a transactional perspective is particularly fruitful for the analysis of the dramatic work of William Shakespeare. Drama is an inherently relational art form created by the writer, the director, actors and audience. Further, Shakespeare’s output is a palimpsest of classical texts and writers contemporary to him, and was shaped by practical constraints. Viewing his work as situated in a historical time period and in a dialogue with other voices gives us a fuller account of the ontological locus of his creativity.

Open access

Felicia Ceaușu

Abstract

In Europe, since the middle of the 19th century, physicians realized that by plastic creation an improvement of the mental state of many patients can be achieved. Painting, household chores or gardening were meant to eliminate boredom and to take the patients out of isolation. Various activities of today’s art-therapy. At the beginning of the 20th century, various authors showed interest for the paintings and drawings of mental patients. The interest attracted by the psycho-pathological art allowed the organization of international exhibits with the artistic works of the mental patients. The scientific approach of these ways of pathoplastic expression determined the emergence of institutions, studies, periodicals and international reunions concerning this topic.

Open access

Mirela Ștefănescu

Abstract

This paper analyzes a phrase which is specific of cultural space from Iași called "The Iași School of Painting", a term which, as art critics say, is distinguished by several features including the harmony of the composition, the chromaticism and refinement of artistic expression. So, we start in this study with the founders of the first institution of artistic education in Iasi, which strongly influenced the local creative style of plastic expression, then, we talk about the period in which was materialized fully the traditional way of the Iasi school of painting. After December 1989 the visual art from Iasi has gone through many changes, being outlined a new approach to the artistic phenomenon in the context of technological development and the globalization, the moment in which the visual artists tried new plastics formulas. Today the expression the Iasi School of Painting is only a metaphor which illustrates the connection with the glorious past of the great masters.

Open access

Ana-Maria Aprotosoaie-Iftimi

Abstract

Between the age of six and eleven, children easily express themselves through drawing. After this age, there is a blockage due to the development of critical thinking. If during the 6 - 11 age stage children draw using symbol schemes, reporting what they remember and what they understood from what they saw, after the age of 10-11 (secondary phase) children want to draw what they see and thus they face challenges related to technical means and language specific for arts. In this regard, a mediation is necessary between the technical means and the artwork or reproductions of fine art (either in albums, or displayed on a screen) using guided questions. This process, that over the years of teaching proved its efficiency, contributes to the development of students’ imagination and creativity, and to the formation of a useful general culture.