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Pannoniana
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Journal of Humanities

Abstract

The concreteness of life presupposes not only death but equally the process of dying. Reflecting these Phenomena – dying and death – is necessary to make the phenomenon of life more comprehensible. Both the individual and the social life need to be confronted with the factualness of cessation. In this respect, every social form, which does not escape itself, cannot one-dimensionally celebrate life without reflecting on death. A self-conscious life-entity muss (1) be able to differentiate between living and dying and recognize its own death; (2) make itself known the deviations mechanisms of this process; (3) give thought to suicide and sense its limits; (4) revealed the obstructions that daily-life represents in order to reflect on this process. The reflection of dying and death may not represent something new, it is however an ever vital moment of human life.

Abstract

In this article we offer a discussion around our academic-practitioner involvements with one another and with a targeted community, in relation to a particular project. In the title of the article, we have hyphenated the term academic-practitioner to render fuzzy the distinction between “academic” roles (associated with institutions of higher learning and with professional research) and the roles of “practitioners” operating and learning in the field in engagement with communities. In the article we detail our collaborations with one another and with a farming community in all undertaking (co)inquiries around options for social and ecological development. We explain how this fits the epistemological views as offered by Indigenous authors propounding an Indigenous research paradigm (with transformative intent) to generate visions of realities in-the-making, towards enhanced wellbeing in communities and towards a sustainable future. We provide a detailed example in the course of our deliberations.

Abstract

Alexandru Macedonski, like most symbolist poets, has a „special relationship” with death. Anchored in the spirit of Western literature, he knew, without a doubt, the great poems dedicated to death, by Byron, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, etc. Not coincidentally, given the relationships, more or less blunt with the Junimea members, marked by polemics, exchange of epigrams, Caragiale called him, Macabronski. The theme of death, with minor exceptions, is, however, in Macedonski a philosophical obsession transfigured into a vision of the Whole, with its full and emptiness.

Abstract

Hanif Kureishi, an acclaimed contemporary British writer of Pakistani origin, is known to the Romanian reading public primarily through the translations (under the aegis of the Humanitas publishing house) of his novels Intimacy, The Buddha of Suburbia, The Nothing, Gabriel’s Gift and Something to Tell You. One of the foremost representatives of British postcolonial literature, Kureishi masterfully, and at times shockingly, explores the postmodern urban world of human desolation, loneliness and alienation, with the surgical precision and mercilessness of a “terrorist”, as he himself describes the writer and his artistic mission in an interview. Intimacy, in a classic Proustian or Joycean manner, offers a glimpse into twenty-four hours in the life of a middle-aged Londoner, Jay, who fed up with the monotony and routine of his marriage, decides to leave his wife and children in order to pursue a passionate sexual relationship with a younger lover. The novel thematizes such concerns as the clash between traditional values and (post)modern society, between individualism / narcissism and moral duty, morality versus amorality / immorality, and the inevitable alienation of the individual who experiences these conflicts. The present paper aims at offering a reading of Kureishi’s text starting from the writer’s claim that “I’ve never had any desire to be good. (…) I don’t like goodness particularly. I like passion.” From the vantage point of this confession we shall proceed to analyze Intimacy not as a moral handbook, but as the eternal plight of the human soul, caught between the painfulness of duty and the irresistible call of passion.

Summary

The first direct contact with rugby was made by young men from Serbia during the First World War, after retreating through Albania, watching matches of French and English soldiers. During 1916, some 3,500 Serbian boys were sent to France and the United Kingdom to study. During their education at lyceums, colleges and universities, they were given the opportunity to play various sports, including rugby union. In keeping with their interest and quality, the Serbian boys quickly became involved in the school teams. Most Serbian boys actively participated in playing rugby in three Scottish cities - Edinburgh, Glasgow and Dundee. Their interest in the sport was so much that in Edinburgh and Glasgow they formed special teams made up only of Serbs who played matches with other school teams. The highlight of dealing with Serb rugby in Scotland was the performance by the boys of the George Heriot School at the Rugby 7 tournament on March 9, 1918 in Edinburgh and a victory over the British Colonies selection. This performance can be considered the first appearance of a sports team under the name of Serbia on the international stage.

After the end of World War I and the return to the homeland, some of the young men who became acquainted with rugby in France and the United Kingdom actively participated in academic and sports life in their homeland and the result was the establishment of two rugby clubs, in Sabac and Belgrade.

Summary

Although sport can promote moral values and prosocial behavior in youth, numerous research shows that sports engagement alone does not guarantee that outcome. Instead of striving for fair-play and sport excellence which not exclude justness, solidarity and moral integrity, contemporary sport frequently follows the Lombardian ethic, where „winning isn’t everything, it’s the only thing”. Moral pause or bracketed morality, as described in sport, refers to the phenomenon of tolerance and acceptance of aggressive behavior or cheating, that will be morally condemned outside sports arenas. Accordingly, lower levels of moral reasoning and behavior have been identified in athletes and non-athletes in the sports-related situation in comparison to other life situations; in athletes when compared to non-athletes, in more experienced athletes, high-level athletes, team-sport athletes, and male athletes. Moral reasoning and behavior of athletes are influenced by contextual and personal factors, with coaches having a particularly important role to play. The positive influence of sport on the moral development of athletes might be related to pre-service and in-service education of coaches how to develop adequate moral atmosphere, and how to plan for moral decision-making as an integral part of everyday practice.

Summary

The various manifesting forms of violence fall into the group of acute problems of contemporary Serbian society. There are multiple reasons for this, which are the consequence of a multi-decade post-socialist transformation, complicated by the pauperization of society, as well as by intense globalization processes. Peer violence is one of the negative features of everyday life and lifestyle of children and youth. Having this in mind, the authors have identified some manifesting forms of peer violence in children and youth sports on the territory of the city of Novi Sad. It concerns the results of the analysis of secondary material (more specifically - legal acts and strategies) which deal with the issue of peer violence in sports. Furthermore, the authors have identified the manifesting forms and intensity of peer violence in children and youth sports through conducting focus-group interviews with coaches and parents of children aged 6 to 16. In addition to peer violence, thanks to focus-group discussions, topics such as coach violence over children, as well as parental violence over (their own and others’) children, were mentioned. By researching the population of children, coaches and parents, we have obtained an initial insight into the stated social problem with two compatible views. This is significant because no research group, by the nature of its social roles in sports, has a complete overview of the social problem investigated by the authors. The results of the research represent a contribution to a small number of papers that indicate negative psycho-social consequences in the sports peer group, but also in children and youth sports in general.

Summary

A definition of physical culture highlights knowledge OF and FOR physical exercise, which enables transformation of personality from what it is into what it can be. This true in itself – that physical culture employs knowledge to achieve it, hides an array of its possibilities. This knowledge can certainly be of various levels and courses and based on different systems of values. And when knowledge is based on different systems of values, then the transformation of personality – from the real into the possible level can develop in one or the other direction that is, in a positive or a negative direction.

At a time when money is a measure of everything, one can readily choose the wrong side in which, according to neoliberalism – everything is allowed. There is no place for orthodox Christian ethics in such environment. This is why we wish to remind you that a lack of orthodox Christian ethics in the science and the profession emerging from the science and supported by global ideas which like a tsunami tear down foundations of civilizational values can lead to worrysome collapse of these basic values. Man would lose most from this collapse.

Indeed, our profession is focused on man and his bodily movements – exercise. Therefore, theory and practice of physical culture must be supported by orthodox Christian ethics. In theory, it can be found in theo-anthropocentrism whereas it is an open book in the practice of physical education, sports and recreation; the situation is different.

It is because of this diversity that we will look at different approaches both in theory and practice of physical culture.

Abstract

If Cioran’s articles could be easily examined in terms of their political message, his aforisms, short texts, or essays have nothing to justify their analysis from the perspective of their “political” content. Cioran’s thoughts, bordering on the poetic, are not comparable to Heidegger’s writings in which, as some try to convince us, the totalitarian ideology has deeply penetrated the very core of the ontology he developed. Even if scholars have identified features of national-socialism in Heidegger’s works, it is still difficult to blame him for his ideas since he has quickly and lucidly reconsidered his approach to the Nazi ideology. Cioran’s writings have nothing in common with Corneliu Zelea Codreanu’s books, For My Legionaries or The Nest Leader’s Manual. Corneliu Zelea Codreanu’s hatred for Judeo-Communism has no correspondent in Emil Cioran’s writings.