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Abstract

Businesses today face great competition in their operations, making it necessary for them to adopt a “customer-oriented” approach. In this competitive environment, where customers are more valuable, enterprises accrue great advantages from an understanding of the characteristics of the target audience in all dimensions. This is where the importance of geo-marketing and demographic segmentation for enterprises emerges. This study performed a geo-demographic segmentation of the urban neighbourhoods of Eskişehir province and sought to determine the characteristics of the people living in these neighbourhoods at the household level. The Groups created using the SPSS package program as well as Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Clustering Analysis were then mapped on the GIS platform as urban neighbourhoods.

Abstract

The study aims at interrogating the transformation of education in Buffalo City following integration of East London with its black townships. This paper is largely framed from a quantitative paradigm that draws from statistical data in linking population changes with educational patterns in the study area. Census data was used to trace population changes in post-apartheid South Africa, while performance in education was informed by matriculation results. Quantitative data were complemented with key informants’ qualitative opinions. The results indicate that the quality of education in former “white” schools is better than that of “township” schools. There are several pull factors that attract township learners to former white schools, albeit with integration challenges. The study concludes that if these challenges are masked to education planners and policy makers, they militate against the envisioned liberalisation of the democratic education system.

Abstract

The focus on urban planning continues to flood the global literature. However, there is continued silence and neglect with regard to rural planning. The study examined the state of rural planning in Oyo State, Nigeria. Primary data was sourced using structured questionnaires and in-depth interviews. Questionnaires were administered to two hundred and fifty (250) rural households in six (6) rural local government areas (LGAs) of Oyo State. It was revealed that rural areas remain neglected and behind in planning activities. A majority of respondents believe that no planning takes place in the rural communities in which they reside. The study concludes that improved communication on planning issues between the tiers of the bureau of physical planning and urban development offices remains the route to effective planning. Improved capacity building (expertise) and training are suggested for rural planners. It is also suggested that understanding the local culture is important in contributing towards effective and responsive rural planning.

Abstract

A comparative study of pre- and post-flood households’ food security statuses in South-Eastern Nigeria was performed to answer the question “Do floods affect food security?” Data were generated via a survey of 400 households in eight communities using stratified and random sampling methods. Households’ food security statuses were assessed using the Household Food Security Survey Module (HFSSM) and computed using a Rasch analysis, where households were divided into four categories, namely: food secure, food insecure without hunger, moderately food insecure with hunger and severely food insecure with hunger. The results show that flooding affects food security negatively by increasing the number of food insecure households to 92.8%, and the regression coefficient of −0.798 indicates a very strong negative effect of flooding on household food security. An odds ratio of 2.221 implies that households that have experienced flooding are 2.221 times more probable to be food insecure than households that have not. The implication of the findings is that flooding is capable of turning communities into food insecurity hotspots that would need long-term assistance to cope, and flooding is capable of hampering the achievement of Goal 2 of the SDGs.

Abstract

This article introduces a step-by-step methodology for evaluating an enterprise’s investment attractiveness in the context of economic development, using appropriate valuation parameters at macro, meso and micro levels. A system of indicators of macro-level investment attractiveness has been formed based on the criteria of socio-economic and legal attractiveness and investment risks. The indicators for assessing investment attractiveness of the industry have been grouped by the criteria of: prospects of the industry, positioning of the enterprise in the industry market, and sectoral investment risks. The indicators of investment attractiveness have been systematised with the use of three-dimensional current and operational analysis, as well as the method of risk assessment, which helped to determine the area of reaction to risk zones of the enterprise’s investment potential. The research allowed us to assess the position of a company in the market and to predict the risks of investing in the chemical industry.

Abstract

This article aims to show how changes in the model for financing basic sanitation affect social inequality and urban segregation, and to discuss alternatives that minimise the impact these changes have on low-income populations. The investigation focuses on mediations between sanitation policy and general urban policies in the more ample process of valorising capital, involving different scales of geography and forms of state action. Widespread privatisation and public–private partnerships have altered the role that rates charged to users play in financing sanitation systems. This, in turn, has an impact on low-income populations’ access to these systems. The study concludes that new models of financing tend to privilege spaces in the city that are attractive to private capital, and that investments in sanitation are supported by financial innovations that depend on the collective force of remunerating shareholders and maintaining investors’ expectations. Finally, the article approaches solutions that ensure low-income families’ access to public services, with special emphasis on subsidised rate systems based on the stratification of urban areas adopted in Colombia. The article concludes that this experiment presents both positive and negative aspects that may serve as starting points toward potential solutions for Brazil.

Abstract

One of the most critical decisions that every developer has to make is what location will be the best for his investment. This depends on different factors that change over the years. Therefore, the aim of the article is to identify and assess tendencies in the location of developers’ investments based on the example of the activity of Łódź developers. In the past, the share of investments on outskirts was more significant, which in the case of Łódź resulted from several reasons – mainly the small number of local plans, the abuse of planning decisions, and low land prices on the outskirts. Therefore, the current tendency of locating a significant part of investments in the city centre seems to be a very positive phenomenon. It reduces the costs of these investments and creates a more compact urban built-up area.

Abstract

The objective of this contribution is to identify, on the basis of an empirical content analysis of documents, the results of fulfilling the 2030 Agenda in the Czech Republic and Slovakia in terms of their global responsibility for fulfilling development goals, by identifying indicators for each of the 17 goals of the 2030 Agenda. This was based on selective research in terms of the selected pilot indicator for each goal of Agenda 2030. These selected indicators were chosen because they best represented the social, economic and territorial problems of the countries surveyed. Their fulfilment is therefore the most important part of fulfilling the complex Sustainable Development Goals. Then a selective and complex relational comparison of the analysed countries in terms of their performance in implementation will be performed on the basis of data obtained using the SDG index. The outcome of the paper is a specification of the surveyed countries’ prospects for meeting all the examined aspects of the SDG by 2030 by an arithmetic expression of their potential to reach 100% in the surveyed indicators. This paper is part of the solution of Project VEGA no. 1/0302/18 “Smart Cities as a possibility for implementation of the concept of Sustainable Urban Development in the Slovak Republic”.

Abstract

Tourist perceptions are critical in shaping tourism development at a destination. Regardless of the centrality and vulnerability of the tourism industry, tourism geographers have been shying away from perception studies, and more so in Africa. Some of the destinations most vulnerable to climate change and related weather activities are water-based natural resorts. Recent droughts have ignited an intense debate that has brought the future viability of tourism in Victoria Falls into question. Using a mixed-method approach, the study sought to document tourist perceptions and attitudes regarding the impact and future of the Victoria Falls World Heritage Site. It emerged that Victoria Falls is categorised as a last-chance tourism destination. Going forward there is need for continuous resort monitoring, tourism product diversification, and transparency and proper communication, particularly during years of extreme droughts, in order to avoid tourism disruption. Climate change action is a must for all tourism stakeholders to save the resort.

Abstract

Accessing finances for housing has been a major problem for people on low-incomes and this has been weighing heavily on them as they try to access housing. Financial institutions in the city of Bulawayo are failing to come up with financial products that suit low-income clients. There are an estimated 110000 low-income residents among the estimated 250000 residents of Cowdray Park low-density residential area in Bulawayo. This has also affected their right to the city as they have been excluded from the housing delivery system. There are so many initiatives that have been available to those on a low-income but these initiatives have rarely benefited the urban poor of the city. This research has examined how the financial services that exist in the housing sector have been crafted to benefit the urban poor. The research employed a mixed methods approach to the inquiry, where a questionnaire was the main quantitative method used and in-depth interviews and observations were the qualitative methods that complemented it. The research found that there are various financial services that are available in Zimbabwe, but these financial facilities rarely help the urban poor. The majority of the poor have been managing without any financial support and this has been stalling their access to housing. Most housing products are fashioned along neo-liberal economic principles that have very little to offer the urban poor. This has therefore denied the urban poor in the city of Bulawayo their right to the city. Most cities in Zimbabwe are struggling to satisfy their housing demand as they have long housing waiting lists. Research therefore recommends the crafting of financial facilities that are best targeted on the urban poor, and are specially adapted to their financial conditions.