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Abstract

Six Bohemian silver coins described here come from the inheritance of Jiří Sedmík from Prague (1898–1942), a collector and important Czechoslovak diplomat, who participated in the anti-Nazi resistance. He was arrested in 1940 and executed in Berlin-Plötzensee at the end of 1942. Based on previously published data, some 70 Bohemian pieces (Prague grossi) were discovered in Budislavice even in 1917. Unfortunately, these coins were finally distributed in the systematic collection of the Museum of West Bohemia, and it is hard to get any information about them. But in 1964, another hoard from Budislavice was deposited in the Museum of West Bohemia. Typologically similar small coins – mostly of Bohemian origin – were of very bad condition. Torso of a vessel, in which the coins used to be buried, has been preserved. Later on, the content of this hoard was studied, and relevant basic data were published here, because of it is not impossible to find another hoard at the mentioned location.

Abstract

The Czech National Bank issued nine commemorative coins in 2017. They included six silver CZK 200 coins issued to mark the 300th anniversary of the birth of Maria Theresa, 75th anniversary of operation called Anthropoid, 100th anniversary of the birth of Josef Kainar, 100th anniversary of the foundation of the “Sdružení českých umělců grafiků Hollar”, the 650th anniversary of the chapel of Saint Wenceslas in the Saint Vitus Cathedral and 100th anniversary of the foundation of the Czech Astronomical Society. In addition, one silver CZK 500 coin was issued to mark the 100th anniversary of the battle of Zborov. The second two commemorative CZK 5,000 gold coins from the Castles cycle – dedicated to Bouzov and Pernštejn castles – were also issued.

Abstract

In 2016, one half of a copper gilded coin was found single near the train station Louny předměstí (Louny district). Its prototype corresponds with an Ottoman gold denomination sultani struck under the Sultan Suleyman I (AH 926–974/AD 1520–1566). The name of the ruler and his father were identified, but the enthronization date and the mint-name are located out of the preserved area. The ED XRF analysis confirmed solid copper basis and process of gilding in fire. With high probability, the fake is connected with serious need of gold during the Thirty Years War (and the period closely after that), and it is very likely of the local (Central European) provenance. Bohemian, Moravian and Hungarian contexts of forging activities during the Thirty Years War are analyzed, relevant archaeological and numismatic evidence is summarized.

Abstract

The hoard was discovered before Christmas in 1928 during additional demolition of the foundations of the Jewish hospital, under its foundations, very close to the Jewish cemetery in Prague-Josefov. It used to consist of at least 33 gold coins in a clay bowl. Thirty two coins are represented by the Hungarian ducats struck under Sigismund I of Luxembourg (1387–1437) in Buda (18 pcs), Kremnice (Kremnitz, 7 pcs), Košice (Cassovia, 6 pcs) and Velká Baňa (Nagybánya, 1 pc) before 1430, and one coin is English noble struck under Edward III (1327–1377) in Calais. The hoard is one of three known hoards from Prague with gold issues dating back to the pre-Jagiellon period. It was hidden under the wall of the building in place where the Jewish settlement expanded. The owners of the house – of various origins – changed quickly, and since 1440, the building has been owned continuously by the Jewish community. In time of the burial of the hoard, the house was very likely owned by the Prague brewmaster called Hanuško from Prague (1418–1429/1431, 1440) or by the saddler called Václav Paznehtík (1429/1431–before 1433). The hoard was not reported by the finders, the police detected them soon, and they were brought to the court and sentenced to jail. The National Museum bought the part of the hoard for the numismatic collection in 1930.

Abstract

Unattractive stains on gold coins – sometimes wrongly described or mistakenly understood as gold corrosion – remained in focus of increased interest of scholars especially because of development of modern analytical techniques in the last decades. It is impossible to answer the primary questions about character and reasons of appearance of these stains without deep interdisciplinary knowledge. There is also another important question dealing with prevention of these stains and possibility of their gentle removal. The presented study tries to discover what caused appearance of the dark stains on the surface of the gold medal from Olomouc celebrating handover of the rule to Franz Joseph I and what is their chemical substance, and if it could be – in this case – a result and external effect of violation of the declared fineness.

Abstract

The thaler of Hieronymus Schlick struck in 1527 is presented in this article. It comes from the hoard discovered in Nové Město nad Metují in 1923. Besides the coin in the Chaura collection, it is apparently the second known specimen of this sort with the name of Louis Jagiellon in its marginal legend. It is possible to say that both pieces were evidently made of the same pair of dies.

Abstract

In time of Oldrich of Hardegg († 1536), three small silver denominations copying different coins were produced in Kłodzko. While the pfennigs of the Austrian type are known mainly from hoards in the Austrian territory, the hellers of the Silesian type and the coins of the Bohemian type are documented mostly in the Czech Lands. White coins struck under Vladislaus II Jagiellon (1471–1516) served as prototypes for the copies of the Bohemian type. Issuers of the coins of the Bohemian type in Kłodzko can be easily identified from their marginal legends: there is the name of Oldrich with his title the Count of Hardegg or the Count of Kłodzko legible there. Based on iconographical analysis, analysis of hoards and information from the written sources, it is possible to judge that these coins were struck perhaps in 1512/1513–1514. Because of their extraordinary similarity with official coins, the ruler banned their production starting with March 17, 1514.

Abstract

Two Prague grossi of Wenceslas IV of Luxembourg were found near the Libštejn Castle. The first of these grossi has never been published and it is analysed here in detail. Because of differences in its image and marginal legend, it is newly classified under the recent typological and chronological categories. Both coins were lost very likely in context of the historical events of the 1420s.

Abstract

Practical applicability of alternative sort of coating of contemporary copper forgeries with use of mercury only (i.e. without use of another metal such as silver or tin) has been experimentally definitely proven. This undescribed way of amalgamation coating is based on simple dipping of a cleaned copper flan in mercury. In few hours, a stable silvery layer of the copper amalgam covers the copper surface. This kind of plating was most likely used by forgers in process of plating of the copper forgeries copying parvi of Wenceslas II at the beginning of the 14th century.

Abstract

The presented article describes two group coin-finds from south Bohemia. The first group of coins was discovered via exhumation of a common grave in the surroundings of Horní Lhota near Lásenice dating back to May 1945. It is represented by cash (or remaining part of it) owned by a German soldier in May 1945. The second group of coins was found at the Radíš hillfort, and it is represented by pieces in a wallet evidently lost on a trip or during forest works sometimes between 1949 and 1953. The article emphasizes importance and necessity of documentation even of these late modern coin-finds.