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Abstract

Court beads worn with formal dress represented one of the symbols of social standing of the Qing dynasty aristocracy and officialdom. The appearance of court beads and material used for their production were prescribed in the 18th century encyclopaedic work The Illustrated Regulations for Ceremonial Paraphernalia of the Imperial Court. Nowadays, court beads are found in antiquities markets and in museum collections. The Náprstek Museum in Prague also keeps a small collection distinguished from the several tens of pieces of Qing dynasty formal dress, dress accessories, and other signs of social rank, the number of these items are surprisingly few. In order to answer the question about the scarcity of the objects, the origin of the collection has been studied.

Abstract

Jiří Jan Zeman (1886-1934), a landowner from Sedlec (now Ústí nad Labem region), was buried in an Egyptianizing grave at the cemetery in Klapý. The gravestone was inscribed by an ancient Egyptian inscription containing the tomb owner’s biographical data which was with certainty composed by František Lexa.

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Abstract

This article focuses on jewellery made by the Kuchi people, which is still one of the marginalized topics. It presents the best-known types of Kuchi jewellery, the way it is worn, the most commonly used materials for its production and the most utilized jewellery techniques. With respect to the date of origin, the focus is mainly on the second half of the 20th century, but also on the present, with regard to the growing trade in these types of jewellery. For a more comprehensive illustration of design, material and jewellery techniques, a collection of jewellery from the 20th century and the present from the collections of the Náprstek Museum in Prague and a private collection was examined. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy was used to find out the elemental composition of the materials used in the making of the jewellery.

Abstract

The study deals with the Náprstek Museum ethnographic photo collection. In order to obtain detailed knowledge of the composition of this collection, an analysis was performed using digital data records obtained through an export from the collection database. The data was then edited using MS Excel with the Contingency Table and Contingency Graph tools. The analysis focusd on the perspective of geography and chronology, originator and the type of photographic material in question. Obtained data clearly shows the percentage of each pursued characteristics and allows to combine them and compare the photo collection as a whole with the other part sof museum’s collections. The analysis method can be also used for another collections as well.

Abstract

This report presents current research on aboriginal activity centers in Taidong County, Taiwan, primarily in the townships of Chishang and Yanping with over 30% of the population being of aboriginal ancestry. Taidong County is the region with the most distinctive aboriginal communities in Taiwan. The research attempts to identify the actors behind the operation of such centers and their significance for aboriginal communities. The research investigates the process of selecting suitable location for the facilities, the specific features of such centers, the potential religious significance of the locations including the role of traditional beliefs in predominantly Christian aboriginal communities, the symbolic value of structures built in the traditional style for construction of ethnicity and financing that enables the construction of the facilities and the organization of the festivities held in them. The principle research method used was interviews with local actors including local representatives, organizers of festivities, as well as members of local communities. The research began in 2017.

Abstract

The seventeenth excavation season of the Archaeological Expedition to Wad Ben Naga focused on the continued exploration of the so-called Isis Temple (WBN 300), the Palace of Queen Amanishakheto (WBN 100), and cemetery WBN C260.

Abstract

This article aims to describe the personality of the talented Czech linguist and distinctive philosopher Alois Richard Nykl, with a special focus on his repeated stays in Mexico as well as his reflection of the post-revolutionary developments there. The unpublished travelogue “Present-Day Mexico”, complemented with the author’s short texts and other archive materials from Nykl’s estate, served as the initial material for this study. This has resulted in a colourful and multilayered picture of the Mexican society in the 1920s as well as Nykl’s complex personality. After over 90 years, his analyses of the contemporary situation and estimates of the future development of Mexico provide an opportunity for an interesting comparison with the present state of affairs.

Abstract

The present study focuses on the text and vignette concerning two hippopotamus-headed serpents reclining on rectangular bases, each of them labeled as hayshesh accompanied by a short text stating that he is “a god who makes the ba live in the realm of the dead”. The study of the text reveals that the creature is of a triple significance, in the underworld, in the marine environment (as the sea-horse would) and in the sky. Finally, the development line of the hayshesh-creatures from the seahorses of the 22nd Dynasty coffins to the horse, crocodile or hippopotamus-headed snakes of the Ptolemaic temples shall be drawn and discussed, with Iufaa's attestation forming an important “missing link”.