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Abstract

Facial muscles have an overwhelming importance in obtaining a special sonority, a perfect instrumental technique. In fact, through their vibration all sonority is produced by these muscles, and the level of professionalism one can reach depends on their degree of efficient use. We shall next analyze the specific issues and modality of use. While playing a mouthpiece instrument, due to the way facial muscle s are used, the following issues arise: exaggerated facial muscles stretching, clamping, undue strain, vibration limitation (by over-pressing, outer reason).

Abstract

The present article identifies the characteristics of a good textbook, it analyses and describes some of the concepts used in the structure of the Musical Education textbook for the second grade in the Republic of Moldova. Some units of the textbook are classified and characterised in relation to the requirements of modern education. Also, the article describes working techniques with some of the contents: theme title, the interface text, the informative text, pictographic images.

Abstract

Borne from the relevant and efficient expression in the context of contemporary culture, neo-protestant choral spirituality uses a diversified and meaningful language. From the very beginning of the existence of neo-protestant cults on the territory of our country, the establishment of a liturgical repertoire intended for common intonation or by various choral or vocal-instrumental bands has been one of the primordial preoccupations. Along with choral creations translated from the universal literature, there is a significant number of original works created by Romanian composers within the religious services. Due to extremely diverse themes and extrovert character, neo-protestant choral music includes different styles specific to the great tradition of classical, romantic or modern music as well as influences from the extra-European sphere. The text of these creations, which has biblical inspiration or created by the composer, is a means of great diversification in the reproduction of the sound material. Composers and arrangers with high quality music training and a profound understanding of biblical truths, through sound art wanted to contribute to the enrichment of contemporary neo-protestant choral music repertoire, leaving posterity a significant amount of valuable choral pages as inheritance.

Abstract

This study aims to analyze the variational principle, as it is applied in Dinu Lipatti’s Sonatina for Violin and Piano, from a theoretical-analytical perspective, but also from the standpoint of the interpretative implications. The variational processes, in close connection with the specificity of the neoclassical language of the work, determine an atypical classification of the form of variations in the gender structure, which implies a resizing of the interpretative means by which the musical dramaturgy of the piece can be achieved. The comparison with the classic model of variations as a component of the sonata genre dedicated to the violin-piano duo, as it appears in the works of composers such as Mozart or Beethoven, as a method of analytical research, highlights the language aspects that condition the performer’s vision in the case of Lipatti’s Sonatina, such as character, tempo, metrics, the type of writing, elements of virtuosity or timbre, whose valences are distinct from those determined by a music discourse from the classical era. Understanding the correlation between the succession of movements and the composition of the variational plan constitutes a priority in approaching this work and shaping the desired artistic message; this is why the study attempts to highlight the necessary connection between the structural elements of the composition and those implicitly generated by them, namely the technical and expressive elements required by the interpretative act.

Abstract

A privileged position in discourse on 19th-century opera is occupied by narration concerning the emancipation of national styles. In order to work out a fresh approach in scientific study of this subject, it seems crucial that we should abandon the ethnocentric perspective. This was one of the main postulates of Jean-Marie Pradier’s utopian project of ethnoscenology. Importantly, Pradier also stressed the physical aspect of all stage practice. In the times of Rossini, Verdi, Gounod and Moniuszko, the physicality of the spectacle was associated not only with singing, but also with choreography. The links between 19th-century opera and its broadly conceived dance component are the subject of a highly inspiring essay by Maribeth Clark, whose arguments, theses and conclusions we also present here in detail.

Stanisław Moniuszko’s operatic style is commonly associated with Polish dance rhythms. Still, salon dance should also be considered, apart from national dances, as one of the keys to the composer’s entire oeuvre. In a study of his stage works from both the Vilnius and the Warsaw periods, the dance idiom will not be limited to the presence of dance rhythms in the protagonists’ arias or to the ballet sections. Dance qualities can be discerned in Moniuszko’s music on a much deeper, fundamental level of the construction of operatic narration. Dance is frequently a hidden mechanism that serves as an axis of development for the presented events or as an element that organises the dramaturgy of entire scenes and instrumental passages.

This paper is an attempt to take a fresh look at the role of the dance idiom in Moniuszko’s operatic narrations, an initial reconnaissance, in which I point to the sources of the composer’s inspirations and illustrate my theses with specific examples.

Abstract

The article discusses the notion of Polish music, the possibilities of defining that notion, establishing its scope and listing specific problems related to it. For about 150 years, writers on Polish music have expressed the conviction that it has its own distinctive stylistic and expressive character. Studies concerning the specific qualities of Polish national style after WWII have naturally linked up to Polish music history, mainly that of the 19th century. The new political and cultural situation in Poland after 1989 calls, however, for a change of perspective. We must take into account the present-day cultural situation, in which boundaries are blurred, while supra-national structures and global thinking are beginning to dominate.

The paper attempts to define Polish music as a notion in contemporary discourse on history, to examine the resonance of that category, and to point to artistic phenomena which this notion may be said to describe. I will list and analyse the criteria that have been used to define that notion. Though the problem concerns the history of Polish music at large, the cognitive situation is particularly complex and ambivalent with reference to the 19th century. I will discuss the most common ways of defining the criterion of Polishness in music, namely: the origins and nationality of the composers; their place of activity; references to Polish music traditions, and the expressive qualities of the music itself. In the conclusion, I will present my thesis concerning the possibility of defining Polish music.

Abstract

The collections of the Theatre Department at the National Museum in Prague contain a set of sources that allow us to see how Bohuslav Martinů participated in preparing productions of his stage works. This is a collection of the composer’s correspondence and comments on stage direction written on the occasion of the first Prague performance of the four-part opera Hry o Marii (The Plays of Mary), H 236 in 1936. The text publishes full transcripts of all of these sources with critical commentary. This involves two letters from Bohuslav Martinů addressed to Josef Munclinger, one letter from the management of the National Theatre in Prague to Bohuslav Martinů, and two lists of the composer’s comments on stage direction.

Abstract

In 2017 the National Museum – Czech Museum of Music obtained a rare set of memorabilia for the singer Emmy Destinn (1878–1930) from the estate of her friend Hilda Schueler-Mosert (1888–1965). The two women met in ca. 1905, and they remained in contact until Emmy Destinn’s death. Hilda Schueler, a German sculptress and painter, was forced to flee Germany with her husband in 1942 because of their Jewish origins. After the war, they settled in Sweden. The set of material contains letters, programmes and posters, newspaper clippings, photographs of the two women, and phonograph records. The items were donated by Hilda Schueler’s grandchildren, who live in Sweden.