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Phillip S. Kott and Dan Liao

Abstract

When adjusting for unit nonresponse in a survey, it is common to assume that the response/nonresponse mechanism is a function of variables known either for the entire sample before unit response or at the aggregate level for the frame or population. Often, however, some of the variables governing the response/nonresponse mechanism can only be proxied by variables on the frame while they are measured (more) accurately on the survey itself. For example, an address-based sampling frame may contain area-level estimates for the median annual income and the fraction home ownership in a Census block group, while a household’s annual income category and ownership status are reported on the survey itself for the housing units responding to the survey. A relatively new calibration-weighting technique allows a statistician to calibrate the sample using proxy variables while assuming the response/ nonresponse mechanism is a function of the analogous survey variables. We will demonstrate how this can be done with data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey National Pilot, a nationally representative web-and-mail survey of American households sponsored by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Open access

James Wagner and Kristen Olson

Abstract

In this article, we investigate the relationship between interviewer travel behavior and field outcomes, such as contact rates, response rates, and contact attempts in two studies, the National Survey of Family Growth and the Health and Retirement Study. Using call record paradata that have been aggregated to interviewer-day levels, we examine two important cost drivers as measures of interviewer travel behavior: the distance that interviewers travel to segments and the number of segments visited on an interviewer-day. We explore several predictors of these measures of travel - the geographic size of the sampled areas, measures of urbanicity, and other sample and interviewer characteristics. We also explore the relationship between travel and field outcomes, such as the number of contact attempts made and response rates.We find that the number of segments that are visited on each interviewer-day has a strong association with field outcomes, but the number of miles travelled does not. These findings suggest that survey organizations should routinely monitor the number of segments that interviewers visit, and that more direct measurement of interviewer travel behavior is needed.

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Brian Foley, Ian Shuttleworth and David Martin

Abstract

Many national statistical institutes (NSIs) are seeking to supplement or replace their traditional population census with a methodology underpinned by administrative sources. Health service register data are key in this regard owing to their high population coverage; it is therefore important to improve understanding of data quality in this administrative source. This study investigated the factors associated with record-level address data mismatch between the Northern Ireland (NI) Health Card Registration System (HCRS) and the 2011 Census, using the NI Longitudinal Study (NILS). Address information in the form of anonymised Unique Property Reference Number (XUPRN) was available for circa 334,000 NILS members with census returns in 2001 and 2011, which provided a benchmark to assess XUPRN accuracy in their linked HCRS record for comparable time points. Multinomial logistic regression revealed a significantly greater likelihood of address mismatch in the HCRS for: males; young adults; individuals with no limiting long-term illness; migrants in the year prior to each census; and residents of communal establishments. Identification of population groups affected by poor quality address information in administrative sources can assist NSIs with the development and implementation of methodological improvements to ensure that official population statistics generated from these sources are fit for purpose.

Open access

Jack Pearce

Open access

Jack Pearce

Open access

Jack Pearce

Full access

Jack Pearce

Full access

Jack Pearce