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Monitoring through Potentiality. Essay on the Artist Taken as an Exemplary Model

Abstract

It has become a commonplace to consider the ideal of an artistic work attitude as being the very driving force behind today’s “aesthetic capitalism.” The present contribution questions this notion and shows that the exemplary model of the artist merely represents one component of a much larger “regime of potentiality.” Thus, the article propounds the analysis of “potentialism” as an approach that might help to grasp the reproductive logics of late capitalism without reducing them to a “creativity dispositive.”

Open access
Unemployment Benefit at Work. The Appropriation of a Public Policy by Intermittent Workers in the Performing Arts in France

Abstract

The rise of atypical forms of employment invites us to scrutinize unemployment benefit provision. Unlike the modern world of employment, based on “standard employment contract,” wage-earners in the performing arts advocate for the highly flexible regime of “intermittent” employment. Through the study of the effects of a deregulated market on careers, status and meaning of work, shared by atypical wage-earners, our aim is to understand the informal role of this compensation policy for their self-conception.

Open access
“You’re Not a Real Contemporary Dancer.” Discrepancy and Appropriation of the Artists’ Status by Dancers from a Working Class Background

Summary

This article draws on a long-term ethnographical survey. It aims to discuss the social conditions of possibility in the artistic calling of contemporary dancers from working class backgrounds. In this regard, it shades light on the resources – notably cultural – underlying atypical trajectories of mobility – all the more fragile for being reversible. As will be seen, the acquisition of legitimate cultural capital contributes to change aesthetic tastes without excluding discrepancy, most evident during the creative process.

Open access
Der Einfluss des Bildungsniveaus von Frauen auf das Scheidungsverhalten in der Schweiz, 1952–2013

Abstract

Der Beitrag zeigt auf, dass von 1952 bis 2003 in der Schweiz für hoch gebildete Frauen die höchste Scheidungswahrscheinlichkeit bestand. Von 2004 bis 2013 hingegen sind keine bildungsspezifischen Unterschiede hinsichtlich des Scheidungsverhaltens mehr festzustellen, da die Scheidungswahrscheinlichkeit vor allem für tief, aber auch für mittel gebildete Frauen zugenommen hat. Folglich ist der Zusammenhang zwischen dem Bildungsniveau der Frauen und dem Scheidungsverhalten in der Schweiz zwischen 1952 und 2013 verschwunden.

Open access
Does the Structural Organisation of Lower-Secondary Education in Switzerland Influence Students’ Opportunities of Transition to Upper- Secondary Education? A Multilevel Analysis

Abstract

The Swiss cantonal education systems account for the structural organisation of lower-secondary education (streamed, cooperative or integrated models). We examined whether structural cantonal variations affect students’ transition to upper-secondary education. Analyses drew on data from the TREE study. Multilevel logistic regression analyses indicated that students in cantons with a cooperative or integrated model had, by trend, a higher chance of gaining access to upper-secondary education. The effect was confounded with the language regions.

Open access
Editorial
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Fixed-Term Jobs after Vocational Education and Training in Switzerland: Stepping Stone or Impediment?

Abstract

Competing assumptions about whether entering the labour market via fixed-term jobs is a good or bad start into work life persist in the literature. Based on the longitudinal survey TREE, this article sheds light on (1) who enters the Swiss labour market via fixed-term jobs after graduating from initial vocational education and on (2) the consequences regarding their future returns. Results indicate that vocational education graduates entering the work force via fixed-term jobs of low occupational status must expect lower future wages.

Open access